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THE DARK KNIGHT RISES Post-release thread..... - Printable Version

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- neoolong - 07-20-2012

Quote:

Originally Posted by Spike Marshall View Post

My audience also burst out laughing when it was revealed that Batman let Gordon and his friends get like fifty foot out onto the ice before he made any overture to save them, all because he was busy setting up his giant bat torch. One guy in my audience actually shouted "wow, what a dick" at that moment. Did love some of the shots though, the first Batman/Bane fight is great and and the wide shot as Bane goes mentally and showers Batman with blows in the second fight is really awesome looking.

It's even more dickish since he let them walk that long solely so they'd find the flare and be the ones to light up the giant bat signal, regaining their hope.




- MichaelM - 07-20-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clarence Boddicker View Post

I found it kind of odd that the Joker wasn't even mentioned in the movie. I'm sure they were just trying to respect Heath Ledger or something, but the Joker's actions set the stage for Bruce's retirement. Was he still in Gotham, or had he died in Arkham? Come to think of it, where the hell is Arkham? Was it shut down and incorporated into that prison Bane liberated?

It would be interesting to know how the Joker would have been used in this if Ledger never died.

Agreed all around.  In the pre-release thread, there was some consensus that even Bane wouldn't be so arrogant as to let the Joker out. He'd either kill him outright or leave him locked up. Nolan's Joker would never let Bane get between him and Batman. He'd completely screw up whatever plans Bane had while also making Batman's life a deeper living hell.

I do think, though, he should have been at least mentioned. I understand why he wasn't, but....yeah.

I can easily see the role being recast and Blakeman having to deal with an on-the-loose Joker as the first big challenge of his career.




- harleyquinn22 - 07-20-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelM View Post

Agreed all around.  In the pre-release thread, there was some consensus that even Bane wouldn't be so arrogant as to let the Joker out. He'd either kill him outright or leave him locked up. Nolan's Joker would never let Bane get between him and Batman. He'd completely screw up whatever plans Bane had while also making Batman's life a deeper living hell.

I do think, though, he should have been at least mentioned. I understand why he wasn't, but....yeah.

I can easily see the role being recast and Blakeman having to deal with an on-the-loose Joker as the first big challenge of his career.

You are all assuming that The Joker is even being imprisoned in Gotham.  Arkham was rendered unusable by the end of Begins, and it's not mentioned again, so for all we know, it's still a mess.  He might be imprisoned out of town.  You don't always end up in prison in the same place that you commit the crime.  Bernie Madoff was tried in NYC and is in prison in NC.




- rainbowtrout - 07-20-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by HarleyQuinn22 View Post

I heard the difference from his very first line.  I could understand 99% of everything Bane said.  There was still a line here or there that I missed, but I think that was the fault of the sound mix.  When the focus is on him talking rather than action happening while he's talking, I could hear him clear as a bell.

Almost all the comments from people leaving the theater today were about not being able to understand Bane.   The overdubbed/polished/fixed dialogue was very obvious,  but I still had trouble with maybe 20% of his lines.

And what was the point of the useless Juno Temple character?




- harleyquinn22 - 07-20-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by rainbowtrout View Post

Almost all the comments from people leaving the theater today were about not being able to understand Bane.   The overdubbed/polished/fixed dialogue was very obvious,  but I still had trouble with maybe 20% of his lines.

And what was the point of the useless Juno Temple character?

Did you see it in IMAX?  Maybe my ridiculous sound system helped me out.




- rainbowtrout - 07-20-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by HarleyQuinn22 View Post

Did you see it in IMAX?  Maybe my ridiculous sound system helped me out.

The sound system was very loud, but I'm not sure if that means it was good.  It was striking how sometimes Bane's voice was clear as a bell in an obvious remix, and then would be impossible to understand a minute later.

I'm going to see the film again at a different theater.  Maybe a different sound system will help.




- ben w - 07-20-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by rainbowtrout View Post

And what was the point of the useless Juno Temple character?

Maybe to demonstrate that Selina had no problem with severing relationships and leaving people to die?  That's the only thing I can think of because she just kinda disappears.




- renn brown - 07-20-2012

She exists to say the line, "...and now it's everyone's house."




- parker - 07-21-2012

She's there for the lesbian subtext. Which kinda gets thrown away in the last shot, but whatever.




- seventyone - 07-21-2012

Why go by "Miranda"?  I mean, I can see dropping the "al Ghul" surname, but how does calling yourself "Talia" reveal your true identity to anyone in Gotham?  Oh, that's why, to set up a Shamaylan-like twist, to shock the fanbois (who figured it out as soon as the role was cast months ago).

Sometime around Batman teleporting from Morrocco to Gotham City and then deciding the best way to save millions engangered by an A-bomb is to engage a dude that whipped his ass in another fistfight, I realized the best thing going for this movie is that surely it will result in a Mr. Plinkett review to rival "The Phantom Menace".  It's another Pirates 3--saw that at the midnight premiere at Disney World--everyone but me ate it up.  Six months later, begrudging admission from all of them that the film has a few really great set pieces that just get lost in an overly long, nonsensical plot.  I expect the same to happen here.




- parker - 07-21-2012

Bigger question about Talia: why does she sleep with Wayne?




- parker - 07-21-2012

I'm really conflicted about the movie.

I hated the first forty-five minutes, mostly because every line of dialogue felt like it was dialed up to 11. It was the NO MORE DEAD COPS! of Batman movies. Nolan took some of the on the nose and amplified themes and dialogue and just made it...bigger, badder and worse. The speeches. Oh, the speeches and clunky exposition and THEMES being shoved down your throat (not to mention the heavy foreshadowing; did anyone not think that Alfred's wish to see Wayne in the restaurant wasn't going to payoff somehow)?

But then a strange thing happened; at about an hour again, I began to admire it for how bonkers it was, warts and all. The plot holes never bothered me in The Dark Knight because I got wrapped up in the wonder of it all. It awed me. That didn't happen here, but I was still impressed with just how willing Nolan was to nuke his own story and common sense for just raising the stakes to a level of purse insanity. It's definitely a "BIG" Batman movie, just far from the best.

I like it better than Begins, but it's not anywhere as good as The Dark Knight Rises. The one theme I liked was how Wayne and Gordon's (and Alfred's, really) lie had consequences and that they both had to suffer and be reborn in order to correct that mistakes. But other than that and Dent/Rachel's death, The Dark Knight feels like it barely has anything to do with this movie, which seemed really strange to me.

I'm still not really sure I can say I liked it yet. I think there's a lot in the trilogy that I admire, but there's too much dumb shit in the first and the second that I just don't care about. So all in all, it's a bit of a wash.




- harleyquinn22 - 07-21-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by Parker View Post

Bigger question about Talia: why does she sleep with Wayne?

Hate sex is hot.




- naisu baddi - 07-21-2012

Although some of Nolan's plot turns didn't quite work, I think the greatest shame of this movie was (as I feared) Bane's voice. Clearly a lot was done to make it as intelligible as possible, but that goddamn mask was a handicap that no sound acrobatics could completely overcome. I think this is where Nolan's obsession with plausible real world explanations for everything bites him in the ass most. Ebert went as far as to say his mask robs him of any personality, and while I think that's a bit of an excessive criticism, it's apt to a point.

I could see that at various points (particularly during his speech about Harvey Dent) Hardy had some interesting, even eloquent dialog. I could also see him trying to give an intense and engaging performance, but he was undermined at every turn by that cumbersome mask garbling every other word. He still managed to be very entertaining to watch at times, but his mask/sound mix didn't help.

It seemed to be designed that way mostly so Nolan could have the dialog about how Bane needs it to pump anti-pain meds into it because of the beating he took protecting Talia. Yeah, yeah, it's all well and good on the plausibility scale, but I don't think giving the mask a believable function is worth sacrificing the audience's ability to hear intriguing dialog that would make the villain more compelling and make an actor's performance more effective.

I was iffy about the mask from the start and people said I was just being a whiny fanboy (I admit, I kinda was) and it had to be changed because he would look fucking ridiculous in the Luchador or Pulp Fiction gimp masks he wore on "Batman: The Animated Series". But at least with those you wouldn't have had trouble hearing him sometimes. They exposed the mouth. The fact that he frequently spoke in a flowery British accent was also problematic as it undercut the seriousness of some of his words.




- parker - 07-21-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by HarleyQuinn22 View Post

Hate sex is hot.

Possibly, but in a Nolan movie hate sex = lame after hours Showtime sex.




- parker - 07-21-2012

Also, others have mentioned it here and Lauren mentioned it on Facebook: this was basically the Rocky of Batman movies.




- naisu baddi - 07-21-2012

More positive thoughts (and because I have too much to say in one post):
Loved Hathway as Catwoman. I originally thought she's too young and had slimmed down too much to look right for how I thought the character should look. It didn't matter in the end, because the character was written so well and her performance was so fun.  Her character was one of the only things in the movie that I thought worked well from start to finish. As I'd hoped, she was like The Joker in that she had almost all of the best lines and gave the movie a jolt every time she showed up.
I saw the Talia twist coming a mile away, and was waiting the whole movie for it. Maybe I'm the only who was thrilled when it happened, judging by what people are saying about her. I agree that the character was underdeveloped.  I think I even missed one of her key scenes talking with Wayne because I went to the bathroom and when I came back, Wayne was dancing with Selina at a party. He talks to Tate at the party too, right? When they had sex, I was like, "Where did that come from? This character has barely even said a word for the whole movie, and now she's in bed with Wayne? Did I miss THAT much?".  Still, as a fan of the character, I was just happy to see her, even if she was underused.
The Robin line was cheesy, but the last shots of Bruce, Selina, Alfred, and John Blake felt right. Whatever Nolan's flaws may be, I think endings definitely aren't one of them. Much like the "Inception" and "The Dark Knight" endings, this one felt like a poetic little crowd-pleaser. Also, I don't think we should necessarily interpret that Robin line as confirmation that Blake is literally going to become the hero named Robin. Maybe it's just a cute wink for people familiar with the character.
My friend said he had a feeling from the moment that dude showed up that he might be Robin eventually. In total lame fanboy mode, I countered: "But Robin's real name is Richard! Not John!". I might add that he was also a circus acrobat, not a cop. 
I was surprised by how emotionally effective some of the scenes between Alfred and Bruce were. It's kind of like what "Spider-Man 3" tried to do, ending the series with some emotionally powerful moments between characters except, you know...subtle enough to not be laughably over-the-top. Speaking of things that remind me of "Spider-Man 3", except better, Selina sort of reminded of the Venom character. Secondary villain who isn't the main focus, but shows up from time to time being charismatic.
Only this time not shoehorned into the movie late, and not dying shortly after becoming an evil threat (although that description fits Talia - yikes!), not played by someone miscast, and given some dialog that's actually great. I guess what I'm trying to say is, this movie is a lot of things, but it's no "Spider-Man 3". And unlike Devin saying "The Dark Knight" is no "Spider-Man 2", I mean that as a compliment.



- naisu baddi - 07-21-2012

P.S. To the person who said they were hoping Michael Caine would just look up and smile without us seeing what he sees at the end, I object to your suggestion with a hearty FUCK NO. I was totally expecting that to happen and was terrified that it might.

I hate in movies or TV when we see a character looking up at something with reverence and we don't get to see it. I get the point. It's trying to maintain some mystery and leave things to our imagination, but dammit, I wanna fucking see it.



- cylon baby - 07-21-2012

Caught a late matinee in a theater maybe 1/3 full. I'd rate this as 2nd behind Dark Knight with Begins as the 3rd best in the Nolan trilogy.

I thought the acting was great all across the board here, with Bale being the best and most surprising. Going into the film I was all "Batman would NEVER retire!" but Nolan and Bale sell it. Bruce Wayne/Batman made a conscious decision to support Harvey Dent 8 years ago, support him to the extent of making Batman the "fall guy" for Two Face's murders. And it works to the extent that Gordon becomes Commissioner and cleans house, and the Dent Act ensures that organized crime is kept off the street (which is an interesting assumption on Nolan's part: that it was the presence of Crime "Master minds" that permeated Gotham with corruption from top to bottom of society). So there is no need for Batman as Gotham has leadership with a spine (Gordon really, with Mayor Eyeliner riding his coattails for 8 years).

And Bale sells Bruce Wayne as a man adrift. He wanted to act as a symbol for Gotham to fight crime, found a better "legit" symbol in Harvey Dent. If he continued as Batman he'd undermine that symbol, since Batman was now regarded as a criminal himself. Bale shows Bruce Wayne's vulnerability and neediness (NOT Emo!). He's let his guard down. And Talia Al Ghul sees that, takes advantage of it, and moves right in. But without Batman Wayne has no purpose. You can see how as soon as Bruce gets interested in Catwoman his voice gets stronger and more focused, and Alfred recognizes it.

Thought Hardy did a good job overall, but man that voice remix: in my theater the soundtrack blasted over much of the dialog, but everytime Bane opened his mouth IT WAS PRETTY GODDAMN LOUD!

Hathaway was MVP of the film, but I also like how the character was written.

Nolan references the fact that many criminals become what they are due to circumstance, while others are simply evil by nature, and it's the later that Batman deals with. And that is also a call back to BB, where Bruce Wayne becomes a thief to see what the "criminal" mindset is, only to realize quickly that life is more complicated than he thought. He pushes Selina to "better herself" as a way of proving that his theory of people's better natures is correct. Same with the people in the Ferries in TDK. Wayne has a faith in people's goodness that is rewarded in the films.

As many people have commented, in terms of plot this film is sloppy, sloppy, sloppy. A gang of Terrorists break into and "hijack" the Stock Exchange, and no one questions all the trades made that day? No one is even suspicious? Oh and Alfred does a Google search (I guess) and learns that Bane had worked for Daggat (nice BSG reference!) to overthrow an African regime, but NO ONE (other than Alfred) connects that Bane with the Bane who hijacks the Stock Exchange and oh look, a bunch of trades happen the same day and Daggat benefits! hmmmmmmm

I was shocked that they went full "KnightFall", except then they didn't. We SEE Bane break Batman's back, but then some amateur Chiropractor spies one popped Vertebrae, gives it a quick punch (!)   (Kids, do NOT try that at home!), and Bruce is just fine?! (I guess one could argue the Batsuit someone protected Wayne but maaaaannnn).

The biggest criticism I have of the Nolan Batfilms remains: I never ever get the sense that Gotham is particularly rotten. Not like say, Baltimore as depicted in the Wire. Burton's Gotham, I totally get. That city would breed monsters. Nolans' Gotham seems like a nice clean city but then Joker happens.




- kevin macken - 07-21-2012

I'm just struggling to understand the logic of Bane's/Talia's evil master-plan.  I mean, I really enjoyed the movie and was able to just ignore it at the time, but repeat viewings may not be as kind.  Seriously did I miss something?  Was there ever a reason given for the months long delay of setting off the bomb?




- laurenortega - 07-21-2012

Quote:
She's there for the lesbian subtext. Which kinda gets thrown away in the last shot, but whatever.

Sadly, because I'd rather see "The Adventures of vaguely lesbian Catwoman" instead of another round of po-faced Batman.

And yes this movie is basically a Rocky movie, even down to the montage.




- c.s. lewis jr. - 07-21-2012

It was because Bane wanted the people of Gotham to feel hope before he crushed them; however, I don't see how laying siege to Gotham, setting free 1,000 criminals, blowing up a football stadium, and murdering rich people inspired hope or liberation. I still can't believe that much of the narrative made it past the treatment stage. Such amateurish, opaque writing.

I'm not a huge fan of these films, but I am a huge Batman fan, and I wanted to see the series end well, but it seems Nolan had no clue where this one was going. There are things I remember from Batman Begins and The Dark Knight, those films aren't perfect in any sense, but they pop and leave indelible impressions. I got none of that from this -- it's completely forgettable. It's such a shame that the backbone of these movies -- Caine and Oldman have nothing to do. Alfred's scenes consist of bellowing heavy-handed pieces of exposition while tactfully giving away the ending.




- laurenortega - 07-21-2012

The League of Shadows plan is absolutely insane. Which is probably why I enjoy that part a little.

It's like all of a sudden they realize how wonderfully silly Batman's universe is.




- Fafhrd - 07-21-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cylon Baby View Post
 Daggat (nice BSG reference!)

Daggett. And it's more a reference to Roland Daggett, who was responsible for the creation of Clayface in Batman: The Animated Series, and beyond that was a super-corrupt industrialist who would use whatever means he thought were necessary to get ahead in business, such as using pre-Clayface Matt Hagen to frame Bruce Wayne for the attempted murder of Lucius Fox.




- MrTyres - 07-21-2012

Despite my complaining in the Spiderman 3 vs ASM thread about Sandman, I would kill for a Batman Clayface movie. The technology is here! Honestly, if they beefed up the Animated series two parter script for a film, I would be sold.




- Fafhrd - 07-21-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by HarleyQuinn22 View Post

ETA: the fuck was up with the Man of Steel trailer using music from Gandalf's death scene in Fellowship?!

Zach Snyder knowing that it'll make people sad because he can't actually pull off any sort of emotional weight with imagery or dialogue?




- ady meet roy - 07-21-2012

Just got back. It was definitely "fun," but kinda nonsensical. It felt a lot more like Batman Begins than Dark Knight (although it clearly wants to be as "important" as Dark Knight), but once it builds up its head of steam, it was a blast. It just had a silly James Bond-y plot, so the themes of the film just didn't resonate like its predecessor.

Thought Anne Hathaway was pretty great. I may still prefer Pfeiffer's Catwoman from Batman Returns, but this film did a much better job portraying the character of Selina Kyle/Catwoman.

Alfred leaving Bruce early on really pissed me off, though, and felt completely out of character. It feels like something the writers needed him to do, so that Bruce could have  a more dramatic character arc; it was not something true to Alfred's character.

Bane felt like a bit of a wasted opportunity, although his hand-to-hand fights with Batman were pretty intense. When he ended up being Talia's muscle, he became instantly uninteresting to me, and I barely cared that he died...unfortunately, I don't think he'll stick with me the way the Joker did from the previous film.

Non-movie related, there were about a dozen cop cars parked around the theater, and several policemen on foot patrolling the area. It lent a bit of an ominous air to the screening. Anybody else experience this today?

Overall, an enjoyable film, but not without its flaws.




- freeman - 07-21-2012

Ok, going to dump my thoughts before I read the last few spoilery pages and start to contribute in a more meaningful way.  Naturally as it's opening night, I will be putting in some spoilers.

I think I was properly prepared for this movie, as I expected the first two acts to be good/dumb/problematic, and I found enough to be engaged and enjoy the goings on.  Unfortunately this movie is kind of proof positive that Heath Ledger carried The Dark Knight largely on his shoulders.  I guess that's a good way to start talking about the villains...

Bane.  This is such an interesting case.  They cast Tom Hardy(my second choice behind Dwayne Johnson) a VERY talented very intimidating and scary actor to play a character that is hugely physical.  As he's written on paper Bane is actually, unfortunately, kind of boring.  He's got fanatical followers, which is cool, but he never does much more than be big and scary.  Sure he chokes people to death and snaps necks, but a bad guy snapping somebody's neck is borderline stupid cliche for bad guys.  There was nothing shocking or daring or exciting about Bane, and although Tom Hardy does his DAMNED BEST to act around that face and performance constricting mask, the writing is not there to support him.  In fact his best moments are largely ruined by the trailers and the prologue, such as "Once Gotham is ashes, you have my permission to die.", or advancing on a scared and enraged Batman.

All the radical changes to Bane, what he is, his mask, the fucking Sean Connery/Walrus VOICE...  All such interesting changes and choices, I was hoping the character of Bane would follow suit and be daring and magnetic and demand my attention in the same kind of incredibly charasmatic ways that Ledgers Joker did, but in his own unique way.  The script never allows Bane to be that character, he's under written ESPECIALLY considering that they knew this was following such an incredible villainous performance.  Also, the dubbing.  It was obvious and sounded bad compared to the on location prologue stuff, which at least sounded natural if incredibly muffled.  At times, the dubb didn't match up with the performance on screen I feel, and it only hurt the performance, if only slightly.  Also, his death was RIDICULOUS.  I was shocked talking to my friends after when I realized being shot was Bane's exit from the movie after being such a major big bad.  I know Talia leaving is his emotional high, but this guy has been a HUGE factor in this movie!  You can't just sweep him under the rug!

The fight scenes.  This has never been Nolans strong suit, but even The Dark Knight had that semi truck chase, and sadly nothing in this movie comes even close to being as big or interesting or exciting.  Since the Knightfall moment had to be in this script, I was hoping they would bring in somebody to do a big well choreographed Fist of Legend style BRAWL.  Sadly, the fist fights are just kind of meh, which is not good enough for a blockbuster of this scale.  You need Wolverine vs Lady Deathstrike.  You need to knock the audiences hair back dammit!

Talia.  I was SOOOOO worried that Bane was actually going to be Ra's son.   As soon as Talia revealed herself though, and the whole story of the child fell into place I kind of loved it.  The reveal of Hardy as Talia's protectector, and the lone shot of Hardy's actual face is proof of what a great actor can do when a mask doesn't cover his entire face.  Although it was hilarious that Talia was horribly killed and Gordon was completed FINE in that crash.

Selina.  PERFECT.  She NAILED the lazy sexy drawwwwl of Catwoman, and she's a joy every time she's on screen.  Her chemistry with Bale was wonderful.  I found myself wanting to see more of her instead of being excited when I see Bane like I figured I would be.  Also, it makes me incredibly happy to realize that Bruce's realization of Alfred's dream is for Bruce to lounge on the beach with Selina for the rest of his life.  If there's ever a parting gift that could make being The Batman worth it for all those years, it's ending up with Ms. Kyle.

That's probably a big enough post for now.  More thoughts as I stew on it.




- Felix - 07-21-2012

So is Bruce just going to retire. Or is he going to train that kid after this? The film didn't exactly give us a clear answer about that.

Thought Anne Hathaway was just perfect as Selina. Sexy and dangerous all at the same time.




- MichaelM - 07-21-2012

I am again convinced TDKR is the new PROMETHEUS. It might be too soon for this - I have no idea what this film will be like viewed at home when it comes out on blu - but while I see the problems, the film still works for me. Similar to the PROMETHEUS discussions, I actually see a lot of thematic consistency here, and I see a war movie as the means to conclude the story of Bruce Wayne as Batman. I do think the film has some problems, but I also think some of the criticisms I'm reading boil down to disagreements on Nolan's version of Wayne/Batman (people not buying 8 years as a recluse, for instance) rather than "mistakes" or errors on the part of the film.

Re: Talia: we're being a little myopic, I think. Yes, the Batman and nerd community figured out very quickly Miranda wasn't Miranda. But you have to remember that most of the moviegoing public doesn't have the faintest fucking idea who Talia Al Ghul is. And despite the spy photos that emerged, we have to go with the text of the film as given, rather than bringing what we know from amateur photos taken of the production. And the film very clearly sets Miranda up as Talia. Her dialogue to Bruce at the ball is laced with League keywords; her word choices are very deliberate, and build on the existing text of Nolan's films (if you watched BEGINS within a few days before seeing TDKR and wer paying attention, Talia's speech should have been ringing bells like crazy). So it wasn't an out of nowhere twist at the end of the film; Nolan basically tells you up front Miranda ain't what she seems. And, as I and someone else pointed out, Talia delivers what she hopes is the fatal knife thrust that strongly echoes what Ra's says to Bruce in the climax of BEGINS. That, to me, is very good writing to close out a series.

Now, that doesn't solve the problem of figuring out why she slept with Wayne (Harley's wisdom aside); nor does it address the problem of Talia not really being essential for the film. You could remove her character, shift her lines and actions to other characters, and the film remains intact. That's not good writing.

I am really looking forward to seeing the film again tonight and seeing what stands out on a second viewing.




- freeman - 07-21-2012

Quote:
As far as where to go next: I would be totally cool with the idea of them spinning this into a Nightwing/Batman Beyond hybrid concept.

SO MUCH THIS.  Soft reboot it, a kind of Bourne Legacy if you will!




- Bucho - 07-21-2012

LOVED IT!

So damn fine I leave the nits where they are, unpicked. In the scheme of things, relative to everything this movie rules at, they're not big enough to matter to me, so, fuck 'em.

I haven't read this thread or any other reviews yet but for right now I'm so effing pumped I'm here doing this. For you guys. For love.

That's all.

Except, for the record, I don't know any of the mythology behind Batman beyond what's in the films and TV shows. I like him, I'm just not nerdgay for him.

As for Nolan it goes something like this -

Memento 9/10

Batman Begins 7/10

The Prestige 6/10

The Dark Knight 7/10

Inception 8/10

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES 10/10




- freeman - 07-21-2012

Wow.  Your scoring of The Dark Knight vs this movie confuses and scares me.




- arturo rj - 07-21-2012

A[quote name="Freeman" url="/community/t/144220/the-dark-knight-rises-post-release-thread/300#post_3360851"]SO MUCH THIS.  Soft reboot it, a kind of Bourne Legacy if you will!

[Image: 700]
[/quote]

This. Would be a cool to see a slight futuristic Batman movie. Plus would fit with the Blake character since he isn't as damaged as Wayne so a fun action packed sci-fi-ish superhero movie would be great. Just hire Duncan Jones.


- rainbowtrout - 07-21-2012

It's interesting that people are mentioning Rocky.  In the final Batman vs Bane fight, it's very similar in style, pace and outcome of the final fight of Rocky vs Clubber Lang in Rocky III.  When Bane has his mouthpiece hit and goes crazy and starts swinging wildly and missing while Batman lands counterpunches,  I could almost hear Stu Nahan and Bill Baldwin announcing.