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Film Critic Catch-All
I'm going to give this a go but my hot take is that this some insane mental gymnastics that is retroactively trying to explain why so many people ignore the text right in the film, ironically like this idea! Conspiracy theory logic basically. But we shall see!
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I liked Fish's work on Cracked quite a bit, so I'll give it a shot when I have an hour. Like Munson, I generally disdain these elaborate mental gymnastics, but since Fight Club's actual plot is already in crackpot mental gymnastics territory, I'm more open to entertaining it.
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home taping is killing music
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heheheh I showed some friends her previous video (who also watch cake shows), and they had that bitter response she describes in this one

NOBODY LIKES BEING LECTURED AT ABOUT THINGS THEY ENJOY!!!

Hahahaha

me, I love it
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The Mr. Peel look at Brad Pitt in KILLING THEM SOFTLY, released 6 years ago today.

http://mrpeelsardineliqueur.blogspot.com...unity.html


"It’s valid to ask whether it matters if we even like a film. Some films don’t want to make that easy on us anyway. But how valid is a film if we don’t like it? And if we can accept that it has a certain amount of worth regardless, does that mean the film is doing its job? Released at the very end of November 2012 when it immediately died at the box office, KILLING THEM SOFTLY is set during the financial crisis that occurred during the 2008 election season which automatically brings a certain amount of didacticism to the storyline, a SHAMPOO sort of vibe to make us automatically question what it all means. I wasn’t entirely certain what it meant at the time myself, fresh after the re-election we’d just gone through and what a more innocent time that was. On that opening weekend KILLING THEM SOFTLY wasn’t exactly a film I particularly enjoyed aside from a few isolated moments but there were a few things in there that stuck with me. It’s possible the film means more now what with everything currently going on but I’m still not sure about that and it probably doesn’t matter very much, anyway. After all, these days it’s tough to figure out if any film matters. The way things are right now, it’s understandable to wonder if anything makes sense but that doesn’t mean any of it does. "

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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Lindsay?
"I'd rather have hope...than nothing at all."
-Illyana Rasputin, X-Men: Omega #1

"But the public, knowing what it wanted, spinning happily, let the comic books survive."
-Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

Twitter: @BartLBishop
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The FIGHT CLUB video was interesting. I don't buy the "Tyler is real!" idea at all and seems more like placing "deep reading" over actual text, unreliable narrator be damned. The fascism stuff is kinda there but ehh. Really you can slap a whole bunch of ideologies on Tyler imo. It's more anarchist to me but it's not totally unreasonable. Some of the race stuff felt more like late 90's casting vs an overt choice to make them all white, but I could be wrong. Maggie felt like she spoke for people a bit too much at times, especially with the "Tyler is so cool" stuff. I only saw the movie 4 or 5 years ago so I came in knowing "don't think he's cool" so it's kind of unfair but, again, it is in the text of the film that Tyler is very wrong. I assume people who think Tyler is so cool don't really watch the third act. The video made me think the legacy of FIGHT CLUB as a kind of canary in the coal mine for critical thinking/reading comprehension and fiction. You fucked up English teachers! Or perhaps it's the danger in ideological ambiguity?

Ironically the video made me wish for a "Would you like to know more?" prompt. She kinda drops stuff at times that could use more exploring in order to get to another point. Which is kind of my own peeve with a lot of solo YouTube stuff; I like the wacky theories but, imo, it works better as a discussion vs a giant monologue. Less of an opposing view and more of a moderator/interviewer just to kind of prod a bit.
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(11-30-2018, 09:09 PM)bartleby_scriven Wrote: Lindsay?

Lindssssssay
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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Lindsay's latest video was interesting but I prefer the in depth movie analysis. Personally I'm not effected by product placement. Not because I'm too smart for it, its because I'm on a budget.
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is that I have lost my way. The good news is that I'm way ahead of schedule.
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Like Stories of Old has done a nice piece on a favorite of mine. Shout out to Bart for the heads up on it.



"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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(11-30-2018, 10:07 PM)Munson Wrote: The FIGHT CLUB video was interesting. I don't buy the "Tyler is real!" idea at all and seems more like placing "deep reading" over actual text, unreliable narrator be damned. The fascism stuff is kinda there but ehh. Really you can slap a whole bunch of ideologies on Tyler imo. It's more anarchist to me but it's not totally unreasonable. Some of the race stuff felt more like late 90's casting vs an overt choice to make them all white, but I could be wrong. Maggie felt like she spoke for people a bit too much at times, especially with the "Tyler is so cool" stuff. I only saw the movie 4 or 5 years ago so I came in knowing "don't think he's cool" so it's kind of unfair but, again, it is in the text of the film that Tyler is very wrong. I assume people who think Tyler is so cool don't really watch the third act. The video made me think the legacy of FIGHT CLUB as a kind of canary in the coal mine for critical thinking/reading comprehension and fiction. You fucked up English teachers! Or perhaps it's the danger in ideological ambiguity?

Ironically the video made me wish for a "Would you like to know more?" prompt. She kinda drops stuff at times that could use more exploring in order to get to another point. Which is kind of my own peeve with a lot of solo YouTube stuff; I like the wacky theories but, imo, it works better as a discussion vs a giant monologue. Less of an opposing view and more of a moderator/interviewer just to kind of prod a bit.

But Tyler is real, in any text of the film. I didn’t take her reading as proposing an alternate reality version of the film, just a different angle from which to view it. Tyler’s always along for the ride, watching what Jack does, so there is a degree to which he’s “using” Jack’s softer edges to recruit guys like Bob. I don’t agree with everything Maggie said (I don’t the movie is as repulsed by Marla as she contends, for instance) but her basic point is just that the audience is drawn in by the same methods as Bob. Which is interesting.
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didn't notice that Nerdwriter had gone SUPERWIDE and has a new video out about why the biggest movies of the year don't feature smartphones






I find this a really odd 'conclusion' to come to about the lack of smartphones/devices in popular movies.  

for a channel that's generally really observant about this stuff, it ignores the idea that smart phone use in movies is REALLY uncinematic and overly convenient for the characters and the plot, which is anti-drama

the moment a movie like this introduces the use of a device that is so versatile in what it can do for its user ("there's an app for that"), it becomes a narrative crutch that raises questions (and why horror movies have to go to greater strain to isolate their characters in remote areas)

it's no different than movies of the aughts featuring the cliche of cell phones that would always have no signal or run out of batteries at the worst moment... and such developments are so transparently hackneyed that it's no wonder a film would try to avoid them as audiences grew savvy

this seems like asking "why weren't there MORE newspapers and TV broadcasts shown in the top movies of 1994???"

which were...


1. Forrest Gump
2. The Lion King
3. True Lies
4. The Santa Clause
5. The Flintstones
6. Dumb and Dumber
7. Clear and Present Danger
8. Speed
9. The Mastk
10. Pulp Fiction


I think that's one of the really smart conceits of SEARCHING

to have a story about a father using our everyday modern technology told through nothing but screens makes total sense


because such a story normally told would likely be mostly scenes of John Cho hunched over a computer/ipad or talking on the phone
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I want to know why more movies this year didn't feature rainbow afro wigs.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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see, THAT's a much better question!
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Smartphones are so uncinematically mindnumbingly boringly boring I only made it halfway through that 7 minute video before feeling like my life no longer meant anything.

Just spend 12 seconds presenting the smartphone spottings in a black and white Excel table next time dude, that'd be 1,000,000,000% less dull than spending 3 minutes watching clips of people using smartphones in blockbusters.
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unless a story is specifically about how people communicate in the modern world, smart phones and devices in TV/movies is now just an exposition device along the lines of...

(background character pops head into an ongoing conversation between two characters)

"hey!  check out what's on the TV.  you GOTTA see this!"

(everyone crowds around the TV)

except it's smartphones now


I see that a bunch of the comments on the video is his audience pushing back on the subject about overthinking it.  GOOD!
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That's a good call Nooj, although the crowding around the TV thing is still at least an order of magnitude more cinematic than using a smartphone as that narrative devices's device.
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it can be effective when you see an entire crowd of people looking at the same thing on their devices

that can be cinematic in a similar way (but not exactly the same)

depend on execution
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Would you rather fight 10 cat-sized T-Rexes or one T-Rex-sized cat?
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(12-01-2018, 09:46 PM)Nooj Wrote: it can be effective when you see an entire crowd of people looking at the same thing on their devices

that can be cinematic in a similar way (but not exactly the same)

depend on execution

The gold standard for this trope is, of course, The Happening. “What kind of terrorists are these?”
Originally posted by Schwartz on Cool as Ice ("When a girl has a heart of stone, there's only one way to melt it. Just add Ice."):
"It's not just a mixed metaphor, or that the stone is one that is melting...but the ice is actually making it melt. (kisses fingers) Magnifique."
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Paul Schrader Wants Better Moviegoers, Says Audiences Don’t Take Films Seriously


"What there was in the ‘70s was better audiences," Schrader says about the lack of quality films plaguing Hollywood in 2018.

https://www.indiewire.com/2018/11/paul-s...202024149/


“There are people who talk about the American cinema of the ‘70s as some halcyon period,” Schrader said (via Deadline). “It was to a degree but not because there were any more talented filmmakers. There’s probably, in fact, more talented filmmakers today than there was in the ‘70s. What there was in the ‘70s was better audiences.”

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
(12-01-2018, 09:46 PM)Nooj Wrote: it can be effective when you see an entire crowd of people looking at the same thing on their devices

that can be cinematic in a similar way (but not exactly the same)

depend on execution

Showing the virality of big news is I think the new cinematic thing. The way it moves through a crowd in a wave, so instead of people flocking to a single location to see the news you get this pulse through the crowd, people stopping dead in their tracks, etc.

The now series finale of Daredevil did this pretty well, imo. When Fisk and Vanessa are dancing at their wedding and everybody pulls out their phones to record it and then all get the link to the video of the one guy's confession.
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This is being re-tweeted around. How did they NOT turn this into a movie?


"In my search for a Trashy Read [TM], I stumbled across this. I haven't read it (YET) and it's OOP, but I think we can all agree its urgent relevance calls for a fancy Penguin Modern Classics reissue immediately"

https://twitter.com/AmeliaMangan/status/...0597011457




[Image: DtaM7sOUwAAr5cX.jpg:large]



[Image: DtaNV3cVAAAAbxQ.jpg]

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
The Director’s Cut: A Label Often Redefined, Now by Lars von Trier

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/27/movie...s-cut.html


"When it debuted at the Cannes Film Festival in May, the director Lars von Trier’s new film, “The House That Jack Built,” prompted walkouts, dismissals and outright condemnations because of its graphic depictions of a serial killer’s spree of sexualized violence.

Now he and his distributor, IFC Films, are hoping an unorthodox release plan will help spin bad press in their favor. An edited, R-rated version of “Jack” will reach theaters and video on demand on Dec. 14; but first the unrated director’s cut will show in cinemas on Wednesday for “one night only,” all but daring audiences to withstand what so many at Cannes could not.

The “director’s cut” label is usually affixed after a film’s traditional release rather than before, but the Danish provocateur’s savvy appropriation seems a logical variation on that pliable phrase — which has undergone a fascinating transformation over the past four decades. And, like so much of the current moviemaking landscape, its ubiquity is owed, in no small part, to Steven Spielberg and George Lucas."

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
Yeah, that sounds like a von Trier manoeuvre.
“I feel a connection with you. A man connection. A mannection.”
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The smartphone thing is always interesting because it reminds me of that Tony Zhou/Taylor Ramos video on texting in movies. I think a big reason you don't see smart phones more often in film is because we haven't figured out a good and uniform way to convey information on those screens that is also cheap to produce. Once iMovie or whatever adds a "add texting" effect, I expect you'll see more phones.

Also, that Schrader quote is hot garbage. Marya E. Gates has been spitting straight fire about that, here:

"Marya E. Gates on why cinema today isn’t the same as the 70s: a fuckton more women directors."

https://twitter.com/oldfilmsflicker/stat...7351265280

"There’s plenty of adventurous cinema being made now. It’s the studios and distributors that aren’t taking the risks. That trickles down to what your average audience is able to see. It’s not the audiences or the filmmakers that have changed."

"On top of that you have far more filmmakers of color, queer, and women behind the camera. But again the studios aren’t backing them and the distributors give them the worst reach."

https://twitter.com/oldfilmsflicker/stat...5205556224

And here she talks about how the fact that a lot of films directed by women are no longer available on 35 mm, so that leads to their exclusion from some of Film Twitter's "churches":

https://twitter.com/oldfilmsflicker/stat...9813549062
home taping is killing music
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I dunno. TV and movies have been applying those screens after-the-fact pretty easily for a while now. There's a lot of examples that are done without us really realizing, but considering the practical realities of trying to shoot something on a screen, there's much more utility in adding it in post (avoiding screen glare/reflections as well as using texting as a cheap way to change dialogue/exposition in post-production)

Not quite an iMovie setting yet, but relatively easily done if you're willing to pay for it

The point from the video was that we don't see such screens all that often in the biggest movies of the year. And my point is that this is actually very natural the more fantastical/escapist such movies get.
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I just keep thinking about how I watched a number of those Netflix or Netflix adjacent romcoms this summer, and for every one, like THE KISSING BOOTH or LOVE, SIMON, that handled texting well, there was a SIERRA BURGESS IS A LOSER, where texting is crucial to the plot and I couldn't read a gatdamn thing because of those reflections.
home taping is killing music
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sounds like a production that couldn't afford to pay for it!
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But they got that Netflix money. No excuses.
home taping is killing music
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I don't think it's an original netflick production

just something already being made that was acquired by the streaming service with their logo slapped onto it
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From Black Label Media, turns out.

You would think the makers of SICARIO and ONLY THE BRAVE (a top ten film of Chewers everywhere!) would pony up!
home taping is killing music
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I really liked ONLY THE BRAVE!!

well done kosinski!
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The irony of the non-cinematic smartphone is that to us Gen X goofballs they were literally the stuff of science fiction dreams when we were growing up, and yet have become so insanely mundane over the last decade that I start to nod off as soon as one appears on a cinema screen.
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Eh. Original Star Trek had the flip-top communicators. That's good enough for me.
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