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Does Jenny McCarthy deserve this much hate?
#71
(02-10-2019, 01:46 PM)bradito Wrote: Hot take: I don't think Jim Carrey's paintings are very good.

But they are CRUSHING Trump!
“I call upon you to stop this musical now,” she said to the board. “You tear a community apart if you don’t.” -Prachi Ruina                                                            
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#72
(02-10-2019, 01:46 PM)bradito Wrote: Hot take: I don't think Jim Carrey's paintings are very good.

We finally agree on something. The world can explode now.
Originally Posted by ImmortanNick 

Saw Batman v Superman.
Now I know what it's like to see Nickelback in concert.

That's my review.
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#73
Darla Shine, the wife of White House communications director Bill Shine, is spreading anti-vaccine conspiracy theories and calling an ongoing measles outbreak "fake news." 

https://twitter.com/RVAwonk/status/1095760524023861253

   

More pictures at the link.
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#74
https://www.huffpost.com/entry/feds-may-...7a1ed57e4b

Quote:FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, speaking to CNN on Tuesday, knocked “certain states” for granting “wide exemptions” to vaccine mandates after an outbreak of measles, once eliminated in the U.S., erupted in Washington state in January.

“Some states are engaging in such wide exemptions that they’re creating the opportunity for outbreaks on a scale that is going to have national implications,” Gottlieb said. If “certain states continue down the path that they’re on, I think they’re going to force the hand of the federal health agencies.”

This Gottlieb character better be careful informing his opinions with hundreds of years of established science, or he'll get booted out of the Republican party.
Gamertag: Tweakee
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#75
YouTube still sucks, but this is a start:

https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/car...x-channels

Quote:YouTube on Friday said it would prevent channels that promote anti-vax content from running advertising, saying explicitly that such videos fall under its policy prohibiting the monetization of videos with “dangerous and harmful” content. The move comes after advertisers on YouTube pulled their ads from these videos, following inquiries from BuzzFeed News.

“We have strict policies that govern what videos we allow ads to appear on, and videos that promote anti-vaccination content are a violation of those policies. We enforce these policies vigorously, and if we find a video that violates them, we immediately take action and remove ads,” a YouTube spokesperson said in an email statement to BuzzFeed News.

Earlier this week, BuzzFeed News found that while YouTube usually returns a top search result for queries like “are vaccines safe” from an authorized source such as a children’s hospital, its Up Next algorithm frequently suggested follow up recommendations for anti-vaccination videos.

I still don't appreciate all those five-minute ads I was getting a few months back about Democrats "being the real racists" before watching music videos.
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#76
This is why God gave us Adblock Edge.
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#77
(02-23-2019, 01:10 AM)commodorejohn Wrote: This is why God gave us Adblock Edge.

Yes.
“I call upon you to stop this musical now,” she said to the board. “You tear a community apart if you don’t.” -Prachi Ruina                                                            
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#78
Hey Arizona! You're dumb and you should feel bad!

https://gizmodo.com/arizona-house-panel-...1832857390

Quote:As the measles outbreak in the Pacific Northwest continues to worsen, an Arizona House panel has approved multiple bills to expand vaccine exemptions in the state, the Arizona Republic reported Friday.

The paper reported the state House Health and Human Services Committee approved three bills with 5-4 votes and support from Republican lawmakers. Representative Nancy Barto, who sponsored the bills, claimed that the bills aim to “strike that balance” between arguments on “both sides” and that vaccinations are “not a one size fits all option for every child.” The aims of the bills include expanded exemptions for religious reasons as well as axing a requirement that parents or guardians sign a document in order to opt out of vaccinations.

In a state with a higher-than-average population of elderly with depressed immune systems, I don't see how this could possibly go wrong!

Carry on Arizona! This is why you're the Florida of the west!
Gamertag: Tweakee
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#79
The Anti-Vaxx movement needs to be fucking crushed.

I hold idiots like McCarthy responsible, I hold politicians responsible, but most importantly I hold the fucking media responsible for valuing ratings (i.e. money) over truthful reporting and intelligent discourse.

This shit needs to be crushed immediately before more people die due to the actions of snake oil peddling morons.
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#80
It's the same as those people who let their kid die because seeking medical attention was against their religion. Look...I'm all for everybody believing or not believing what they want. But when it gets past a certain point it crosses over into dangerous and criminally negligent..
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#81
Hey Arizona! You're dumb and you should feel bad!

(Wow, I already used that? Damn Arizona, you SO STUPID!)

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/gop-state...c2f2957d8e

Quote:Arizona state Rep. Kelly Townsend ® took to Facebook on Thursday bemoaning not the transmission of a wholly preventable illness but communism, for some reason.

Townsend’s belief that vaccines cause harm — a claim researchers have repeatedly debunked — stems from her 22-year-old daughter’s unspecified health problems, according to The Washington Post. The lawmaker blames vaccines she gave her daughter at 10 months.

Townsend ended her statement with a couple of paragraphs on “fundamentals” before closing with a Benjamin Franklin quote: “Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.”

The irony of that quote, which refers to a tax dispute, is that Franklin was a strong proponent of vaccinating children. After his son died from the disease, he even teamed up with a London physician to write an instructional guide on smallpox vaccinations.

STOP ELECTING DUMB DUMBS!
Gamertag: Tweakee
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#82
I'm kinda late to this discussion, but I'm gonna go ahead and respond to the thread's title question.

Yes, yes she does.
"I'm not a smart man" -F. Gump
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#83
https://www.huffpost.com/entry/vaccine-m...2f69e6fe28

Quote:Ethan Lindenberger made headlines last month for choosing to get vaccinated against his mother’s wishes. The 18-year-old testified before the Senate health committee on Tuesday about his experience growing up in an anti-vaccine household and the dangers of misinformation, telling lawmakers that his mother’s primary source of information is Facebook.

“Does your mother get most of her information online?” Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-Ga.) asked.

“Mainly Facebook,” Lindenberger replied.

Asked where he looked for information on vaccines, the teen said: “Not Facebook. From the [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention], the World Health Organization, scientific journals ... I try my best also to look at accredited sources.” 

I like this kid!
Gamertag: Tweakee
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#84
https://gizmodo.com/it-took-two-months-a...1833137421

Quote:the 6-year-old boy from Oregon had gotten a forehead scrape while playing outside on a farm sometime in 2017. The wound was cleaned and sutured at home, but six days later the boy began experiencing lockjaw and muscle spasms. He then started arching his back and neck involuntarily and eventually could barely breathe, prompting his family to call for help.

The boy was airlifted to the hospital, unable to even drink water because he couldn’t open his mouth. There, he was given several tetanus shots. He then spent the next 47 days in intensive care, needing a ventilator to breathe and constant medications through an IV to control his pain, blood pressure, and muscle spasms.

All told, he ended up spending 57 days in the hospital, with a bill of $811,929, and that’s excluding the air transport and rehab care. it’s monumentally more expensive than the childhood diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccine (DTaP), which can cost around $30 per dose without insurance

Yes, we need mandatory vaccination laws. Or a licensing process to have a kid.

I'd prefer the latter, but the former seems more likely to pass.
Gamertag: Tweakee
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#85
Gov. Matt Bevin of Kentucky exposed all nine of his children to chickenpox, said vaccines aren't for everyone:

https://www.courier-journal.com/story/ne...221848002/
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#86
Exposing your kid to chickenpox is pretty standard practice where I am. Then again, we all get our kids immunised against all the other stuff too. We don't vaccinate against chrcken pox because of the consequential risk of more serious cases in adults as well as shingles. The risk analysis at a policy level favours letting kids develop natural immunity.
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#87
Yeah, I mean, let's not get too crazy. My mom was a pediatric nurse in a hospital setting for 30+ years until she retired. When we were kids, she found out some neighbors down the street had kids with chicken pox and off my sister and I went, forced to go play with them.

We both got chicken pox (we were 7 or 8), were sick for a week each, and then moved on with our lives. That is not nearly the same as anti-vaxxing idiocy.
If you're happy, you're not paying attention.

Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny: 
Glad that you guys worked that out amongst yourselves.

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#88
Just because pre-vaccine it was standard to just get it over with does NOT mean it's still smart.

During the pre-vaccine days, the CDC reports that chicken pox killed 100 people per year in the US alone.

Intentionally exposing your kid to the chicken pox today IS EXACTLY the same as anti-vaxxing idiocy.

"I'd rather my kid feel like shit for a week but probably not die than give them a perfectly safe and harmless shot." is NOT a logical or defensible position. It's dumb.
Gamertag: Tweakee
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#89
Why is it exactly the same?

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#90
The argument that you should not deliberately expose your child to the risk of serious complications from chickenpox is superficially attractive, but you have to weigh it against the probability of catching it anyway at school or kindergarten, and the higher risk of complications if they catch it as an adult. It is a million miles away from the more straightforward risk issues around non-vaccination. I don't mean to suggest the politician conflating the two isn't an idiot, but those of us with the capacity of integrating intuition and reason ought not to make the mistake of treating them the same.

I do find it fascinating that the snake oil selling, carpet bagging quack the British medical establishment sent packing with his bullshit MMR/autism theories was able to find an audience in the US of sufficient size and marketability to apparently neutralise in part the utter contempt in which he was rightfully previously held as a matter of virtually universal opinion. There is something of a global issue in superpowers and their ability to weaponise bullshit on an industrial scale.
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#91
As someone who didn't get chicken pox until adulthood (age 25), I can advocate for the vaccine. I have no idea what my chances of getting shingles are as I get older (I'm almost 51 and nothing yet [knock on wood]) but having chicken pox as an adult was perhaps the worst bout of illness I've ever had. And I still have (small but visible) facial scars from it.

I don't think not vaccinating your kids against it is some kind of horrific crime (and it's certainly not on par with refusing to vaccinate against measles or polio). I do think it's better for them in the long run.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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#92
From the CDC:

"Chickenpox used to be very common in the United States. In the early 1990s, an average of 4 million people got varicella, 10,500 to 13,000 were hospitalized (range, 8,000 to 18,000), and 100 to 150 died each year. In the 1990s, the highest rate of varicella was reported in preschool-aged children."

How is avoiding this vaccine NOT idiocy?

Sure, most people will survive it. Most people will also survive crossing the street without looking for cars. It doesn't make it smart.
Gamertag: Tweakee
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#93
I do think avoiding vaccines is idiocy, but what I was saying was most children get exposed to chicken pox naturally, and I can understand why parents wouldn't vaccinate their children for it. I could see how home schooling your kids would probably not result in exposure to it, and they wouldn't develop a natural immunity. In that case I would say they should be immunized eventually.

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#94
I would bet there is a strong correlation between home school and anti vaxxrs

It's all a ploy by big vaccine anyways. First you get a chickenpox vaccine, then 50 years later they hit you with the shingles vaccine. Diabolical fiends
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#95
Intentionally exposing your kids to chicken pox so they don't get it worse when they are older just seems like lo-fi, DYI vaccination to me.
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#96
(03-21-2019, 11:12 AM)schwartz Wrote: Intentionally exposing your kids to chicken pox so they don't get it worse when they are older just seems like lo-fi, DYI vaccination to me.

It's like in colonial times when they would wheel around a dying man so they could cut pustules off of his body, then place them under your skin to expose you to the illness. Yes, it was absolutely the best option they had 300 years ago. NOOOOOO, we shouldn't do it today.

Yes, intentionally exposing your kid to the chicken pox was the best option we had 30 years ago. NOOOOO, you shouldn't do it today.
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#97
(03-21-2019, 11:21 AM)farsight Wrote:
(03-21-2019, 11:12 AM)schwartz Wrote: Intentionally exposing your kids to chicken pox so they don't get it worse when they are older just seems like lo-fi, DYI vaccination to me.

It's like in colonial times when they would wheel around a dying man so they could cut pustules off of his body, then place them under your skin to expose you to the illness. Yes, it was absolutely the best option they had 300 years ago. NOOOOOO, we shouldn't do it today.

Yes, intentionally exposing your kid to the chicken pox was the best option we had 30 years ago. NOOOOO, you shouldn't do it today.

I mean, yes, there are better options.  But it's like yes, I should really do a full surgical scrubdown between every step of food prep when I make dinner.  But I generally settle for a squirt of handsoap and quick rinse after handling uncooked meat.  That's not a reflection of a philosophical rejection of germinology, it's just a matter of convenience when dealing with dangers that you recognize as real but also rather remote. 

Whatever.  I'm pro- vaccinating for chicken pox.
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#98
(03-21-2019, 11:21 AM)farsight Wrote: Yes, intentionally exposing your kid to the chicken pox was the best option we had 30 years ago. NOOOOO, you shouldn't do it today.

I mean, sure. The personal anecdote I provided above from my childhood was likely somewhere in the 1979-1981 range. Having said that, my kids have received all the required vaccinations they need, and then some.
If you're happy, you're not paying attention.

Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny: 
Glad that you guys worked that out amongst yourselves.

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#99
Member of the Intentionally Exposed club.
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Careful Turing, Freeman's setting up a quarantine for us.
If you're happy, you're not paying attention.

Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny: 
Glad that you guys worked that out amongst yourselves.

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Haha. Happily immune to chicken pox here too.

We should set up a club. With open evenings for prospective junior members...Wink

I'm not dissing the stats put forward by the Chewers in this thread. I can only speak to a nationalised health service offering free at the point of use immunisation programmes that doesn't advocate immunisation against chicken pox nor castigate intentional exposure in a society that doesn't culturally treat the disease as a signficant threat other than to the extent you might get it as an adult, and hasn't for a generation before me.

There are bigger fish to fry and chicken pox is very clearly not a gateway pox.
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(03-21-2019, 08:28 PM)jhp1608 Wrote: I'm not dissing the stats put forward by the Chewers in this thread. I can only speak to a nationalised health service offering free at the point of use immunisation programmes that doesn't advocate immunisation against chicken pox nor castigate intentional exposure in a society that doesn't culturally treat the disease as a signficant threat other than to the extent you might get it as an adult, and hasn't for a generation before me.

And many people here don't treat the flu or measles as a threat, either. All three are diseases that can be fatal. Just because a disease is rarely fatal doesn't make it a gamble a smart person should willingly choose to take.

Chicken Pox is a disease. Choosing to inflict a disease on a child rather than immunize them against it is stupid.

A state or country that doesn't advocate immunization over exposure is being stupid.

Just because a policy made sense 30 years ago, pre-vaccine, doesn't make it sensible today. Times change. People used to poop into pots and dump it out the window. Then indoor plumbing came along, and having poop-lined streets was no longer considered a sensible solution.

I had chicken pox. It was miserable. If I had learned that my mom had chosen to inflict it on me rather than get me a shot, I'd still be pissed.

And the biggest problem with this, "Well, this particular vaccination isn't that important" reasoning is that it lends legitimacy to others arguing that some other vaccination isn't that important either. If you're embracing faith that your kid won't be one of the rare ones that die from chicken pox, why shouldn't someone else be allowed to do the same for the measles, or polio?
Gamertag: Tweakee
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Because we’re horrible people, clearly. Or at least, in my case, a horrible parent raised by another horrible parent.
If you're happy, you're not paying attention.

Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny: 
Glad that you guys worked that out amongst yourselves.

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(03-21-2019, 08:54 PM)farsight Wrote: And the biggest problem with this, "Well, this particular vaccination isn't that important" reasoning is that it lends legitimacy to others arguing that some other vaccination isn't that important either. If you're embracing faith that your kid won't be one of the rare ones that die from chicken pox, why shouldn't someone else be allowed to do the same for the measles, or polio?

Because of the several orders of magnitude difference in the deadliness of one disease vs the others?  Again, I'm not arguing against the vaccine, but that reasoning doesn't seem so ludicrous to me.
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(03-21-2019, 09:06 PM)Neil Spurn Wrote: Because we’re horrible people, clearly. Or at least, in my case, a horrible parent raised by another horrible parent.

I have no interest in evaluating the whole of a person based on one act. But I will pass judgment on that specific act. People make mistakes.

Unless you're <25 yrs old, your parent had no choice in the matter. You do.

Intentionally making your kid sick when they don't have to be is a mistake.  

(03-21-2019, 10:12 PM)schwartz Wrote: Because of the several orders of magnitude difference in the deadliness of one disease vs the others?  Again, I'm not arguing against the vaccine, but that reasoning doesn't seem so ludicrous to me.

What % of chance of death is okay?

Get a vaccination = 0
Intentionally give your kid chicken pox = 1 in 60,000 die, the rest get sick for a week.

You're arguing that, "I like dem odds!" is a reasonable argument? If so, where is the line? Measles is 1 death per 10,000, btw... are those odds okay too? Should we start having Measles Parties for kids?

Each year, I get vaccinated against the flu. Not because I think it would kill me - it very likely would not, but because being healthy is better than being sick. Why would I actively choose to submit a child to being ill when I'd avoid the same for myself?

I have heard no rational reason to avoid being vaccinated against common illnesses.
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