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Film Critic Catch-All
Lindsey Romain: "i made a quick list of every film that inspired ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD and where you can rent or stream it. check your local video stores and libraries first!"

https://twitter.com/lindseyromain/status...3531526144

Where You Can Watch Every Movie That Inspired Quentin Tarantino’s ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD


https://medium.com/@lindseyj.romain/wher...ae33af4471

"If you’re a student of Quentin Tarantino, you know the drill. The director is notoriously encyclopedic about his film knowledge, braiding references to long-forgotten films into his own projects, paying homage and revitalizing cinema in his own unique way.

To celebrate the upcoming release of Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, Tarantino’s ninth feature film, I’ve compiled a list of legal ways to stream every film he’s mentioned in conjunction with his new title. That is, all of the movies he’s programmed at the New Beverly ahead of Hollywood’s debut, and every film playing on the Sony Channel’s curated list of films that inspired Tarantino’s latest tableau.

But before you jump right to the easy option, I wanted to take a minute to encourage a few other options. First, if you are in the Los Angeles area, head on over to Tarantino’s own movie theatre, the New Beverly, which is running a selection of the below films ahead of Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’s release on July 26. See times and titles here.

If you’re subscribed to the Sony Movie Channel, several of these films will air between July 21 and July 25. Many of them did not make the list below because they are out of print or unavailable for streaming or purchase, so this is a great way to check out films like Hammerhead (1968) and The Wrecking Crew (1968), which stars Sharon Tate in one of her last roles. You can see the full schedule here.

If neither of these are an option, I would urge you to check out your nearest library or video store to see if they carry any of the below films, on VHS, DVD, or Blu-ray. You can use the Digital Public Library of America website to find your nearest library, use your library card to access Kanopy, or check out The Blacklist’s “In Search of the Last Great Video Store,” which includes a map to video stores around the globe."



"

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
One of my holy grails:

"Joan Tewkesbury: "There’s the perversity—the sheer will that drives you to say, 'Fuck you, friend, I’ll show you.'” No one believed Tewkesbury, NASHVILLE scribe, could direct—but as she said, she showed them. OLD BOYFRIENDS opens 8/2 in a new 35mm print"

http://metrograph.com/film/film/2194/old-boyfriends

"The directorial debut of Joan Tewkesbury, then best known for her work as a screenwriter on Robert Altman’s Thieves Like Us (1974) and Nashville (1975), Old Boyfriends follows Talia Shire’s clinical psychologist through a process of emotional bottoming-out and stock-taking, deciding after a breakdown to reconnect with exes played by Richard Jordan and John Belushi, her trip down memory lane leading to Keith Carradine as the brother of a girlhood sweetheart (Buck Henry, P.J. Soles, and John Houseman round out the cast). Working from a script by Paul and Leonard Schrader, Tewkesbury nimbly moves between registers of romantic comedy and psychodrama, delivering an eccentrically digressive, tonally unpredictable, and roundly revelatory first feature."

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
"instead of linking that garbage guardian article to drag its cancel culture profiteering, inability to think critically, & moral purity bullshit, here's a terrific interview with QT by @szacharek, whose Cannes review of OUATIH is still the best i've read."

https://twitter.com/lou_kicks/status/115...6327574528


'Nothing Lasts Forever.' Quentin Tarantino on Sharon Tate, Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood and Retirement

https://time.com/5595352/quentin-taranti...d=tcoshare

"Quentin Tarantino’s ninth film, Once Upon a Time in … Hollywood, covers a lot of territory in three acts, all set in the Los Angeles of 1969 just as Charles Manson was working his sicko spell on a group of slavish followers. Once Upon a Time is the story of fading TV star Rick Dalton (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his longtime stunt double Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt), two guys facing the end of their era with a martini-shaker jumble of anxiety and grace. But the movie really belongs to a character who has less screen time and fewer lines of dialogue than either of the men: Margot Robbie plays fledgling movie star Sharon Tate who, along with three of her friends, was murdered by a group of Manson’s followers on August 8, 1969. Tate, recently married to Roman Polanski, was eight and a half months pregnant at the time. Here, Tarantino discusses his love for the Los Angeles of his childhood, the challenges of giving Tate a new life onscreen, and how reports of his imminent retirement may have been greatly exaggerated—or not."

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
Dig:

https://twitter.com/liz_franczak/status/...7470162945

"spending my mortal hours canceling Quentin Tarantino because I’m a humorless scold with an impressive lack of critical capacity, next to zero taste, and can only understand creative production if it’s spoon fed to me as Content by woke parental corporate guidance officers"

"no one even gets mad at the right art, it's so depressing"

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
CineSavant

Weird Science

by Glenn Erickson Jul 23, 2019

https://trailersfromhell.com/weird-science/


"Woo Hoo! We’re girl-starved teen nerds, and we’re cooking up our own living sex toy with our home computers! John Hughes turns an infantile idea into one of his not-bad teen angst comedies, as Kelly LeBrock materializes to fulfill their wildest dreams. The idea is of course transformed into a basically benign coming-of age story … with the underlying message that we’d not all mind having Ms. LeBrock reformat our hard drive. It all begins as a bad arrested-development joke, but Hughes’ audaciousness and fine production values make this a nostalgic favorite for folk that miss their (ugh) 1980s memories."


"Kelly LeBrock is marvelous, for the reasons pointed out by Arrow’s #metoo- inflected essayists. Lisa’s Alpha-female lamia is in control of everything. She has it handled at all times, in all situations, and not just because LeBrock possesses the beauty and style that intimidates 90% of men. Hughes allows enough sweetness to come through. She’s never oppressively attractive; her appeal has no “I’m cool and you’re not” component."


"Contemporary feminist critics were openly hostile to this movie, to say the least. The essays in Arrow’s booklet are by women writers that stretch for ways to spin this essentially old-school male-oriented fantasy as gender-progressive. They also discuss the vintage horror comic story that inspired the movie."

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
CineSavant

Klute

by Charlie Largent Jul 20, 2019

https://trailersfromhell.com/klute-2/


"Director Alan J. Pakula’s stylish murder mystery connects the dots between depression era potboilers, the doomed romanticism of 40’s noirs and in particular the European crime films that riled up 42nd street audiences in the late 60’s and early 70’s – macabrely glamorous entertainments featuring debonair degenerates like the man Klute is searching for."

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
This is neat:

CineSavant

PHOENIX ON SOUTH F STREET: The Re-Emergence of the Alger Theater

by Dennis Cozzalio Jul 24, 2019

https://trailersfromhell.com/phoenix-on-...r-theater/

“Everybody has something that chews them up and, for me, that thing was always loneliness. The cinema has the power to make you not feel lonely, even when you are.” – Tom Hanks

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
The first part of Amy Nicholson's 3 part series talking film with QT is up!

Part 1 is QT's thoughts on POINT BLANK.


Young Quentin Goes to the Movies

How ‘Point Blank’ influenced Tarantino’s directorial debut, ‘Reservoir Dogs’


https://www.theringer.com/2019/7/25/2072...rvoir-dogs


"The first episode of QUENTIN TARANTINO'S FEATURE PRESENTATION is out!

Quentin and I start talking about the surrealistic 1967 thriller POINT BLANK....and wind up talking about RESERVOIR DOGS, and his own fear that he might not be a good director."

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
That was terrific, thanks for the link.

Can’t wait for part 2 where they talk about Enter the Dragon and Valley Girl.
The most important thing in life is broads. Broads!
Reply
Back to AV Club. I get what Scwartz is getting at. One of the episode summaries for Stranger Things season 3 implied that episode 6 had an anti-immigrant subtext.
  https://tv.avclub.com/in-its-sixth-episo...836009294I
Its the last paragraph. I would like to remind that writer that sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is I've lost my way. The good news is I'm way ahead of schedule!
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Just got around to this. Great read.


Even Now, Rutger Hauer’s Performance in ‘Blade Runner’ Is a Marvel

"With his combination of menace and anguish, he created an unforgettable character that made the movie the classic it remains today."

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/25/movie...hauer.html

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
CineSavant

Merrill’s Marauders

by Glenn Erickson Jul 27, 2019

https://trailersfromhell.com/merrills-marauders/

"Is this Samuel Fuller’s biggest production? He tries to convey the harrowing reality of a military campaign that tested the limits of endurance and punishment that troops could absorb. In his last movie, Jeff Chandler is the famed commander who must ask his special forces to march hundreds of miles in the unforgiving jungle, and then fight a pitched battle. Although Warners interfered with the final cut, it’s still a fine picture."

"Despite the studio meddling, few viewers find anything wrong with Marauders. Critics don’t give it enough credit in Sam Fuller’s filmography because it isn’t politically audacious, and doesn’t showcase the director’s flamboyant tabloid sensibility. China Gate attracts more attention for Fuller-philes, who dote on its eccentric, cartoonish mix of politics and pulp melodrama. The more realistic Marauders hews closer to the core Samuel Fuller, the ‘eternal infantryman’ among postwar Hollywood directors. It’s one of the better films about extreme combat situations, and shows Fuller perfectly capable of doing well with material not of his own devising. Despite its success at the box office it did not lead to more studio deals for its writer-director."

"The fighting details are all Fuller; he likely consulted on the differences between his European experience and the hardships of jungle warfare. The assaults are quick and savage. The soldiers use smoke and grenades to soften up their targets but have to do much of the killing at close quarters. Desperate to take a major objective by surprise, Merrill has his men drop their packs, rush twenty miles and immediately engage in a pitched battle. Fuller stresses the utter exhaustion of it all, so much so that the Army (which provided much assistance) later complained that the film didn’t have enough ‘recruitment flavor.’"

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
As an aside, I finally finished BIG LITTLE LIES season 2 last night, and actually agree that the show completely stranded Bonnie's character in a literal dead-end subplot for the entire back half of the season.
Reply
On some days my favorite Dante....



CineSavant

Piranha

by Charlie Largent Jul 30, 2019



https://trailersfromhell.com/piranha-3/


"In 1968 Joe Dante and Jon Davison teamed up to make The Movie Orgy, a counter-culture take on 1941’s comic blitzkrieg, Hellzapoppin’. Running two hours longer than Ben-Hur, the Dante/Davison opus was an epic mash up of monster movies, kids’ shows, A-Bomb tests and toothpaste commercials – the cinematic equivalent of a Will Elder cartoon.

If it had an agenda, it was pure fun – a seven-hour blow out aimed at altered college kids weened on Mad Magazine and Famous Monsters. These days Bigfoot makes more appearances than The Movie Orgy but when one of those infrequent screenings materializes audiences are galvanized by the onslaught – and surprised by what was hiding in plain sight all the time – the supposedly buttoned-down Eisenhower era was not just deeply subversive but more than a little weird.

In his 2011 essay on the Museum of Modern Art festival, “To Save and Project”, J. Hoberman wrote that Dante and Davison “reinforced the sense of a shared, cathode-ray collective unconscious in the first generation to grow up with TV.” That generation also grew up to be the young stoners in the audience for The Movie Orgy – what they probably didn’t notice was the inception of the one of the most distinctive directorial styles in American movies."


"Few directors nail down their auteur cred right out of the gate but that sophomore effort – framed with the bold strokes of a Looney Tunes cartoon and shot through a wind tunnel of film history – bears all the hallmarks of what is now accepted as The Dante Style. In some respect, all his films could be subtitled The Movie Orgy.

Written by first-time screenwriter John Sayles, Piranha begins with an adventurous young couple braving the night air for a moonlit skinny dip when, in the words of Richard Dreyfuss, they end up as “hot lunch” for the sharp-teethed monsters circling below the surface – the first hint that the Corman-produced exploitation item was conceived with one eye on the box office and the other on Jaws."

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
More QT/ Amy Nicholson discussion

Quentin Tarantino's Feature Presentation Part II:

"In 1973, 10-yr-old Quentin Tarantino couldn't watch ENTER THE DRAGON. The LA kid spent one year cut off from pop culture in rural Tennessee, reading about movies he wasn't sure he'd get to see (at least, before KENTUCKY FRIED MOVIE spoiled the plot). "


"In 1973, the year everyone was flocking to see ‘Enter the Dragon,’ a 10-year-old Tarantino spent most of his time in Knoxville, Tennessee, wishing he could click his heels and go back home to California"

https://www.theringer.com/2019/7/30/2074...-drops-out

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
I'll be daydreaming about QT working with Nic Cage for the rest of the day.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
Deleted. Sorry for making things more toxic.
Reply
(07-31-2019, 03:26 PM)Fat Elvis Wrote: "In 1973, the year everyone was flocking to see ‘Enter the Dragon,’ a 10-year-old Tarantino spent most of his time in Knoxville, Tennessee, wishing he could click his heels and go back home to California"

https://www.theringer.com/2019/7/30/2074...-drops-out

I mentioned this in the "movie things you just realized" thread, but Tarantino mentions that he spent 72-73 in a town called South Clinton. I was born there in '75 and lived there until I moved away after college. Doing the math, if Tarantino needed to see a doctor during that year, he almost certainly saw my grandfather who was named (this is true) John Smith. Short of flying out to the New Bev and cornering Tarantino in the lobby (I won't do this), I have no way of confirming this, so I'll just tell people it's true at parties from now on.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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It's crazy to think that Polanski may have thought his friend Bruce Lee could've been the murder suspect based on the info that the police had given him.
The most important thing in life is broads. Broads!
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A pair of glasses. Yikes.
Reply
(07-31-2019, 05:09 PM)mike j Wrote: How much time will that leave for copying and pasting articles?

What kind of a productive post is this? If it functions as intended, all you're doing is trying to make somebody feel bad.

Not trying to pick a fight. Just don't understand it.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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You're right. It's uncalled for.

He said something in another thread and I let it carry over here.
Reply
I will say that while I dig Elvis' contributions to this thread for the most part, it can be a little frustrating, at times, when some of us are having a discussion about something that doesn't interest him (say, the latest Lindsay Ellis video), and he'll basically stop that discussion in its tracks by posting one to three articles in a row, all formatted the way he does them, which makes it challenging to return to that particular discussion. It kind of takes the wind out of the sails.

That said, this isn't just an Elvis problem. I think all of us, in our time, have been guilty of the conscious or unconscious derail because of a reaction to a discussion. Happens weekly around these boards.

It's just an interesting thing to note as how social interaction is not entirely reflected in online interaction. It's much easier to ignore - or not read - the room in spaces like these.
home taping is killing music
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I think that's all perfectly fair. I was just trying to keep it all cool between the folks who engage here.

And I would say, I often don't join in the discussion in this thread and prefer to just sort of absorb the discourse and the articles shared, so I appreciate Elvis doing what he does (for the most part!).
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
Reply
Pretty enjoyable oral history of REVENGE OF THE NERDS in which they tackle a lot of the skeevy moments in the film:

https://www.gq.com/story/revenge-of-the-...al-history

McGinley participates but no Donald Gibb? Weird.
Reply
For those interested, the final installment of Quentin Tarantino's Feature Presentation

https://twitter.com/TheAmyNicholson/stat...6605037569

Amy muses a bit more critically, and I love that QT is once again honest about what he likes and doesn't like about movies - in this case one by his best friend.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
I've been thinking about this, and I think the legend of Tarantino, film autodidact, has been bad for both movies but also for our culture, particularly our devaluing of experts and the rise of "the cult of the amateur." Not the filmmaker himself, mind. But the legend of him. The idea that anyone can be a filmmaker if they watch enough movies and pick up a camera. Or that anyone can have an opinion/write insightfully about them if they watch enough movies. Which leads to a real flattening of how we value talent and intelligence generally.

Basically, Harry Knowles is Tarantino's fault.
home taping is killing music
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I have a hard time laying that at the feet* of QT. Given the very nature of the internet, such an elevation of the amateur seems like what Agent Smith would call "inevitable."





*see what I did there?
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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The internet began to emerge as a tool of mass communication at roughly the same time Tarantino and his legend emerged as a part of popular culture. Granted, there were stories about how Spielberg and Lucas were movie crazy from birth before QT, but Lucas went to film school, and Spielberg worked as an intern in the editing department at Universal. They had apprenticeships in a way Tarantino did not.

I'm not saying it's wholly Tarantino's fault, but I think that you could make the argument that it was one (perhaps underappreciated) piece of the broader puzzle. I'd also point to the popularity of Rodriguez's "Rebel Without A Crew" and the decreasing expense of video/editing equipment.
home taping is killing music
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RR seemed much more plugged into the online film fan community back in the mid-90s than QT (though I could be entirely wrong). I mean, RR had Knowles as a supporting actor in one of his movies.

But yes, the rise of the amateur auteur definitely paralleled and helped fueled the rise of the amateur film "critic" or expert.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
Reply
There's arguably no Alamo Drafthouse without Tarantino.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quentin_Ta...m_Festival
home taping is killing music
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Bogdanovich was the Film Geek Made Good before any of them.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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(08-05-2019, 09:53 AM)boone daniels Wrote: I've been thinking about this, and I think the legend of Tarantino, film autodidact, has been bad for both movies but also for our culture, particularly our devaluing of experts and the rise of "the cult of the amateur." Not the filmmaker himself, mind. But the legend of him. The idea that anyone can be a filmmaker if they watch enough movies and pick up a camera. Or that anyone can have an opinion/write insightfully about them if they watch enough movies. Which leads to a real flattening of how we value talent and intelligence generally.

Basically, Harry Knowles is Tarantino's fault.
Without FilmBrats ™ like Bogdanovich (especially Bogdanovich) and Scorsese, there's no Tarantino. You can always go back further.
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Bogdanovich worked as a film programmer at MoMA and writer before becoming a director. Scorsese went to NYU.

Again, the point is not "were there movie crazy people before Tarantino" but that "Tarantino's particular style of movie crazy (i.e., watch a bunch of movies, then be a director) was different, with a different sort of impact." The stories/legends about Scorsese, Lucas, Bogdanovich, et. al. inspired people to go to film school, because that's what those guys did, more or less. Robert Townsend and other pre-QT indie film legends suggested that you could finance an independent film with credit cards. Tarantino's legend told people they didn't need to go to film school, they just needed passion, enthusiasm, and a camera.

Now, to counterpoint my own argument, the equally "movie crazy" Paul Thomas Anderson spent a month at NYU before dropping out and making his own movie with what he would have spent at college. But even Anderson had some structural advantages that Tarantino didn't - Anderson's dad was rich, and could finance his stuff, and Anderson grew up around filmmaking because his father worked in television.

A big difference is the way Tarantino talks about film vs. the way Scorsese (or Anderson) talks about film. Tarantino rarely, at least in my experience with him, speaks about the technical aspects of filmmaking and the language of it. Whereas Scorsese and some of his movie brat peers (De Palma and Schrader, as well as Spielberg and Bogdanovich) are more adept at talking about the technical aspects - the actual "filmmaking."

Matt Zoller Seitz has written a lot about this, not Tarantino specifically, but the problem with a lot of modern film criticism : https://www.rogerebert.com/mzs/please-cr...filmmaking
home taping is killing music
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(08-05-2019, 10:50 AM)MichaelM Wrote: RR seemed much more plugged into the online film fan community back in the mid-90s than QT (though I could be entirely wrong). I mean, RR had Knowles as a supporting actor in one of his movies.

But yes, the rise of the amateur auteur definitely paralleled and helped fueled the rise of the amateur film "critic" or expert.
It's said now that QT doesn't use mobile phones or the Internet, but I recall him giving Knowles his script to Kill Bill.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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