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Film Critic Catch-All
Not sure which way I go, but Beaks' 1990 round up reminds me that year might've been the most fun I ever had at the movies.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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Three great performances in a row: I mean, Meryl Streep and Daniel Day-Lewis win that one, right? Has either of them ever given anything approaching a bad performance?
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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(09-16-2019, 09:31 PM)boone daniels Wrote:
(09-16-2019, 08:25 PM)Neil Spurn Wrote:
(09-16-2019, 05:52 PM)boone daniels Wrote: Thanks for the tip, Elvis! I really love the Walter Hill stuff I've seen - and I'm on record that Streets of Fire is maybe my favorite movie of all time.

Wait, what?  Streets of Fire?  That is mildly surprising!  

Show us this "record".

It might be more of a Facebook thing, now that I think about it. But yeah, it's definitely in my top ten, if not number one. It and THE SOCIAL NETWORK are probably the movies I've watched the most this century. I'm also a Jim Steinman nut.

But yeah, my wife and I had our bridal party announcement set to "Tonight is What It Means to Be Young."
 A slight derail, but since you're a Steinman nut, I highly recommend the soundtrack to his Bat Out Of Hell musical. I wouldn't know it existed if it wasn't for the concert thread. My point is these boards can be a source of fun in the crazy world.

As for three great performances in a row, RJD kiss Kiss Bang Bang, Iron Man and Tropic Thunder.
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is I've lost my way. The good news is I'm way ahead of schedule!
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Wasn't he in THE SHAGGY DOG somewhere in there though? I mean he wasn't bad in it.
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So the great performances in a row thing sent me down a rabbit hole on imdb. I had to cut myself off. Anyway here are my submissions-

Emma Thompson- Much Ado About Nothing, The Remains of the Day, In the Name of the Father

DDL- The Last of the Mohicans, The Age of Innocence, In The Name of the Father, The Crucible, The Boxer, Gangs of New York

Tilda Swinton- We Need to Talk About Kevin, Moonrise Kingdom, Only Lovers Left Alive, Snowpiercer

Harrison Ford- ESB, Raiders, Blade Runner, ROTJ, Temple of Doom, Witness, Mosquito Coast, Frantic, Working Girl, Last Crusade

Jack Nicholson- The King of Marvin Gardens, The Last Detail, Chinatown, The Passenger

Harvey Keitel- Thelma & Louise, Bugsy, Reservoir Dogs, Bad Lieutenant

Philip Seymour Hoffman, Magnolia, State & Main, Almost Famous Also, Capote, M:I 3, The Savages, Before the Devil Knows You're Dead, Charlie Wilson's War, Synecdoche, New York, Doubt
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I bet Song Kang-ho finds these "3 great performances in a row" contests absolutely adorable.
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How is Robert De Niro and Al Pacino in the 70s-80s not mentioned here?

And DiCaprio from Boy's Life till...,like, now? I might even throw Critters 3 in there..
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(09-20-2019, 09:31 AM)Adam_72 Wrote: I bet Song Kang-ho finds these "3 great performances in a row" contests absolutely adorable.

I had only seen two in a row of any of his films.  Damn rules.  But agreed the guy has a ton of great performances.  One of my favorite actors.

(09-20-2019, 09:40 AM)fraid uh noman Wrote: How is Robert De Niro and Al Pacino in the 70s-80s not mentioned here?

And DiCaprio from Boy's Life till...,like, now? I might even throw Critters 3 in there..

I did mention I had to stop myself before I wasted too much time on this, right?
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I didn't see that. Sorry..
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(09-20-2019, 09:31 AM)Adam_72 Wrote: I bet Song Kang-ho finds these "3 great performances in a row" contests absolutely adorable.
Like bailey, I haven't seen 3 of his consecutive releases, but everything I've seen has been straight-up great. If YMCA BASEBALL TEAM is as good as JOINT SECURITY AREA, SYMPATHY FOR MR. VENGEANCE and MEMORIES OF MURDER, then that's a helluva run - https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0814280/
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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(09-20-2019, 01:03 PM)Mangy Wrote:
(09-20-2019, 09:31 AM)Adam_72 Wrote: I bet Song Kang-ho finds these "3 great performances in a row" contests absolutely adorable.
Like bailey, I haven't seen 3 of his consecutive releases, but everything I've seen has been straight-up great. If YMCA BASEBALL TEAM is as good as JOINT SECURITY AREA, SYMPATHY FOR MR. VENGEANCE and MEMORIES OF MURDER, then that's a helluva run - https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0814280/

It's not (not even close), but is a pleasant enough distraction. Something along the lines of what Tom Hanks or Billy Crystal could do for an easy paycheck gig circa early '90s.

I think the only average SKH performance I'd seen was in HINDSIGHT where he played a suave gangster macking on a girl half his age. At least he got to play dapper so maybe that was what drew him to it.
The most important thing in life is broads. Broads!
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He's so good he elevates even the otherwise thoroughly mediocre stuff like Antarctic Journal or Howling. Basically, you'll never waste your time with a SKH film.
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Steve Martin: Little Shop of Horrors, Roxanne, Planes, Trains and Automobiles and Dirty Rotten Scoundrels.
My karmic debt must be huge.

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My blog: An Embarrassment of Rich's
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(09-20-2019, 01:23 PM)Adam_72 Wrote: He's so good he elevates even the otherwise thoroughly mediocre stuff like Antarctic Journal or Howling. Basically, you'll never waste your time with a SKH film.

I'm partial to ANTARCTIC JOURNAL as I saw that on the big screen at my last trip to Busan in 2005. His haunted crazy face projected on a 40 foot screen is a thing of beauty. But yeah, the movie could've used a bit more pep.

Never saw HOWLING as I heard it's pretty bad.
The most important thing in life is broads. Broads!
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(09-19-2019, 09:49 PM)Chaz Rock City Wrote:
(09-16-2019, 09:31 PM)boone daniels Wrote:
(09-16-2019, 08:25 PM)Neil Spurn Wrote:
(09-16-2019, 05:52 PM)boone daniels Wrote: Thanks for the tip, Elvis! I really love the Walter Hill stuff I've seen - and I'm on record that Streets of Fire is maybe my favorite movie of all time.

Wait, what?  Streets of Fire?  That is mildly surprising!  

Show us this "record".

It might be more of a Facebook thing, now that I think about it. But yeah, it's definitely in my top ten, if not number one. It and THE SOCIAL NETWORK are probably the movies I've watched the most this century. I'm also a Jim Steinman nut.

But yeah, my wife and I had our bridal party announcement set to "Tonight is What It Means to Be Young."
 A slight derail, but since you're a Steinman nut, I highly recommend the soundtrack to his Bat Out Of Hell musical. I wouldn't know it existed if it wasn't for the concert thread. My point is these boards can be a source of fun in the crazy world.

As for three great performances in a row, RJD kiss Kiss Bang Bang, Iron Man and Tropic Thunder.

Chaz my man, I was the one who posted about BOOH in the concert thread! I also went to a concert a few weeks after seeing the musical to see one of the performers do MORE Jim Steinman songs! I have probably seen more concerts of Jim Steinman music than any other artist. Big Grin
home taping is killing music
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Boone is one of very few people I know that really gets Streets of Fire the way I do.

One of the most enviable streaks for an actor? Dennis Hopper's 1986-87: Blue Velvet, Hoosiers, and River's Edge. If only the Academy nominated him for the former.
"PREDATOR 2 feels like it was penned by convicts as part of a correctional facility's creative writing program, and that's what I love about it." - Moltisanti
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Add Texas Chainsaw 2 to the mix while you're at it.

I'm the Lord of the Harvest!
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Hopper's comeback was so great to watch, especially since you could see how happy he was to be clean and working.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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A Bit of Random: Saw this the other day, and I'm oddly obsessed, too.

"Sort of obsessed with this painting at my doctor’s office. Chicago 1984."

https://twitter.com/mattbucher/status/11...3238099968




[Image: EEttnAkWsAEJ7tn.jpg]

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
why does it look like it’s squeezed into the wrong aspect ratio???

looks cool though!
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A Walter Hill Film
The most important thing in life is broads. Broads!
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A brief write up, but serves well as a final tribute:

Odie Henderson: "Oh damn! RIP Sid Haig. Always reliable and always welcome, as memorable in his 6 battles with Pam Grier as he is in, well everything else. I let out a whoop when I saw him as the judge who sentences Pam in JACKIE BROWN. My 2013 Haig piece at BMV"

http://bigmediavandal.blogspot.com/2013/...-haig.html

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
Been somewhat bummed about Haig all day. Loved him in Devil's Rejects and others. Great piece.
home taping is killing music
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A couple of articles about Rob Zombie:

Quote:Rob Zombie’s cinematic world is one of corruption. Whether in suburban communities or backwater enclaves accessible only by dusty dirt roads, evil is everywhere, and contact with it only spawns more of the same. It’s a brutal place of suffering and madness, which spreads like a virus until everyone and anyone is infected. Loud, crude, and in your face, Zombie’s movies are about the terrifying power of wickedness. And by reveling in the perversity of society’s underbelly, they dispense a potent strain of grungy amorality.

In an increasingly sanitized multiplex landscape consumed with family friendly franchising, Zombie’s stellar output is a knowing throwback to the grindhouse exploitation fare of the ‘60s and ‘70s, and thus functions as an unrepentant act of defiance. He’s the choleric fly in the mainstream-movie ointment, and it’s no surprise, then, that he’s succeeded in rubbing many viewers the wrong way. Look him up on Rotten Tomatoes, and you’ll find the negative far outweighing the positive; his highest-rated effort, The Devil’s Rejects, stands at an unimpressive 56 percent. Even in a genre founded on extremeness, Zombie—a heavy metal icon whose entire professional life is a veritable tribute to horror—wallows in real-deal foulness. In doing so, he’s made himself something of an outlier.

https://www.esquire.com/entertainment/mo...nderrated/

Quote:As far as horror movies go there aren’t many texts more sacred than John Carpenter’s Halloween (1978). It kickstarted the entire slasher boom of the 1980s and sky-rocketed one of the greatest genre filmmakers into stardom. Many fans watch Halloween religiously every time the holiday rolls around and to this day the image of Michael Myers still carries cultural weight. Everyone knows what “The Shape” is and audiences are still flocking to cinemas to see this character slaughter helpless teenagers. Rob Zombie’s take on the character in his 2007 remake is reviled. He took this figure that didn’t have a backstory or any depth beyond a singular image of shadows, a long knife, and a mask, and gave it new context. No one wanted it. Critics argued that it strayed too far from Carpenter’s initial movie or were put off by Rob Zombie’s own brand of trauma and grief-infused violence. The Weinsteins produced Zombie’s Halloween films and the director was miserable the entire time. They didn’t trust Zombie and even though the first film came out of the gates swinging at the box office it quickly fell off when word of mouth on Zombie’s vision for Michael Myers proved toxic. Zombie’s experiences were even worse with the second film. He had final cut taken away from him when the producers saw the film and realized that Zombie had made something closer to Halloween: Fire Walk with Me than a mindless slasher sequel. On the audio commentary track for the director’s cut release of Halloween 2 (2009), Rob Zombie stated that it was a miracle that his cut of the film ever saw the light of day. He ran into problems from the outset when he made a “Laurie Strode film” instead of a Michael Myers one. Halloween 2 was massacred by critics at the time and has only recently begun to be rediscovered by some as a major work of horror filmmaking. After this film Rob Zombie has had a more difficult time finding financing for his movies and the release schedules of his directed works have been scattershot and neglected. His newest feature, Three From Hell (2019), is advertised as a special event from Fathom, but with a three-day-only cinema run and a home video release soon to follow in October, I can’t help but see this as another example of Zombie’s movies being misfit children in an age of art-house drama in horror drag.

Rob Zombie is out of step with the current climate of horror filmmaking. We live in a day and age when horror films and superhero movies are the only universal truth at the box-office. These horror films almost unanimously make a profit because they’re cheap and teenagers have historically always flocked to the genre. But horror movies are in a conservative rut this decade. The term “elevated horror” has been bandied about for art-house directors like Robert Eggers (The Witch) and Ari Aster (Hereditary), who make bloated films that reach for the likes of Stanley Kubrick and Roman Polanski and land somewhere in the vein of slick student filmmaking that renders all of the psychological elements of their craft obvious and overwrought. If these films do attempt to create any scary or chilling elements they’re usually foreshadowed with the subtlety of someone sneaking behind you and firing off an air-horn. Zombie’s films are more complicated, with a filmmaking grammar that feels sleepier and comfortable in the conversational aspects of real characters relating to one another with casual discussions of things like family vacations or ordering pizza. He breaks these moments up with severe violence, and because we’ve spent time with these characters in quotidian moments of relaxation the grief of losing them feels heavier. Zombie even renders his villains in a similar light. Around the mid-way point of The Devil’s Rejects (2005) the film takes a strange turn and pivots from a horror film into that of a road-trip movie, as if the Firefly clan of serial killers took the camera for themselves and charted their own journey with bone-deep sincerity. There’s even a moment where Baby (Sheri Moon Zombie) teases her own brother Otis (Bill Mosely) about tutti frutti ice cream that feels downright charming until you realize that not ten minutes earlier they were brutally murdering a group of people in a hotel room. What Zombie offers as a filmmaker is a lived-in quality for his characters that complicates our relationship to the violence on-screen.

https://mubi.com/notebook/posts/the-size...rob-zombie
“That which doesn't kill you wasn't done right.”—Khaya Dlanga
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I really don't understand the need for people that like a gritter version of horror like Zombie's to basically call "elevated horror" (which is and of itself a dumb term) wimps and nerds. I get that people who have spent a lifetime loving gritty horror films have been seen as weirdos by people who Eggers and Aster and Kent remind them of, and there is a real element (like so much of geek culture these days) of "you can't like this thing now that everyone likes this thing/thinks this thing is cool."

(While this author doesn't do that, I have felt that this divide is also fraught with sexual politics and anti-intellectualism - that some of the authors who write about this are stopping short of saying "You queers with your artsy filmmaking, THE DEVILS' REJECTS is real horror, man!")

As the kids say, why not both? There's that line from the West Wing, too: "People who like baseball can't like books?" That goes both ways. You can like both DEVIL'S REJECTS and MIDSOMMAR! I do!

And to a certain extent, it's, like, shut up. Wes Craven had a master's in philosophy and was a college professor. Tobe Hooper was also a college professor. John Carpenter went to film school. James Whale was the Sam Mendes of the 1920s. Clive Barker was compared often to Angela Carter in his early work.

Rob Zombie went to the same fucking art school where they film Project Runway, which is one of the most prestigious art schools in the country.

It's annoying. I'm annoyed. Can you tell?
home taping is killing music
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"Rob Zombie's elevated horror" is a great euphemism for "Rob Zombie's endless attempts to remake TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE over and over and over and over and...'
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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Eddie in comeback mode looking back. Terrific interview.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/26/movie...urphy.html



Eddie Murphy Is Bringing Eddie Murphy Back

"In a wide-ranging interview, the star explains why he’s returning to stand-up and the big screen, why he regrets leaving and why it’s hard to watch himself in “Raw” these days."


"No one killed like Murphy did in the 1980s. When I saw “Raw” in Washington as a teenager, the audience laughed so loudly that the people running the theater actually turned the movie off and asked us to be quieter."

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
I like how reflective he was in that piece, both in terms of his career, and how he's grown as a comedian.
home taping is killing music
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The Comedians In Cars segment with him is interesting as well, but still fairly guarded and surface-level, even as he's being smart and funny.

I can't fathom doing standup again after 20-something years. Even five years ago, at the SNL reunion, he wasn't quite able to leap that hurdle. I'm just curious to see how it turns out. I really love Sandler's comeback Netflix special because it captures that same ridiculous idiocy Sandler is known for*; I'm not sure Eddie can re-capture that, but I guess that's part of the draw.

* To clarify: the Sandler standup CDs compared to Sandler's movies, and anybody on this site knows the difference
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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(09-27-2019, 08:04 PM)Mangy Wrote: The Comedians In Cars segment with him is interesting as well, but still fairly guarded and surface-level, even as he's being smart and funny.

I can't fathom doing standup again after 20-something years. Even five years ago, at the SNL reunion, he wasn't quite able to leap that hurdle. I'm just curious to see how it turns out. I really love Sandler's comeback Netflix special because it captures that same ridiculous idiocy Sandler is known for*; I'm not sure Eddie can re-capture that, but I guess that's part of the draw.

* To clarify: the Sandler standup CDs compared to Sandler's movies, and anybody on this site knows the difference

But Sandler was always more family friendly right?  Murphy wore his edginess on his sleeve.  I like Raw, but even I cringe at some of that humor when I watch it today.
"Why did she do it?"
"Why are you the fucking Police?"

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(09-27-2019, 09:17 PM)ska oreo Wrote:
(09-27-2019, 08:04 PM)Mangy Wrote: The Comedians In Cars segment with him is interesting as well, but still fairly guarded and surface-level, even as he's being smart and funny.

I can't fathom doing standup again after 20-something years. Even five years ago, at the SNL reunion, he wasn't quite able to leap that hurdle. I'm just curious to see how it turns out. I really love Sandler's comeback Netflix special because it captures that same ridiculous idiocy Sandler is known for*; I'm not sure Eddie can re-capture that, but I guess that's part of the draw.

* To clarify: the Sandler standup CDs compared to Sandler's movies, and anybody on this site knows the difference

But Sandler was always more family friendly right?  Murphy wore his edginess on his sleeve.  I like Raw, but even I cringe at some of that humor when I watch it today.

Sandler's CDs weren't family friendly at all.



I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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It kills me that they stopped the SNL season box sets after the legendary first five years. I really want the Eddie Murphy years. Amazing musical guests mixed with an eclectic collection of hosts. At this point it might be the most underrated/underseen era of the show. Especially the wild Michael O'Donoghue season.




"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
Family friendly might have been the wrong word, but there’s a juvenile sense of humor that I think allowed Sandler to translate his comedy to mainstream audience.
"Why did she do it?"
"Why are you the fucking Police?"

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One more Sid Haig tribute:

I had no idea he turned down the role of Marsellus Wallace! It would have changed the dynamic, but still fun to imagine.

Sid Haig: 1939-2019

by Simon Abrams

September 25, 2019

https://www.rogerebert.com/balder-and-da...-1939-2019

"Haig’s generosity of spirit served him throughout a prolific career that started with tap dancing, included dozens of memorable film and TV credits, and ended with cult worship thanks in no small part to celebrity champions like Zombie and Quentin Tarantino. Born in Fresno, California, Haig hit a growth spurt at the age of seven that led him to try tap dancing, just for the sake of achieving greater physical coordination. Soon after that, Haig was paid to dance in a Christmas pageant as well as in local Vaudeville revivals. After starring in a grade-school production of “The Wizard of Oz” (as the Scarecrow), Haig was encouraged to pursue acting by high school drama teacher Alice Merrill and contemporary musical-comedy star Dennis Morgan. Haig took their advice, and studied at the famous Pasadena Playhouse two years later. While there, Haig was taught by Ernie Brown, a student of Method acting guru Lee Strasberg.

Before that, Haig played drums for the T-Birds, including on their chart-topping 1958 single “Full House.” In a recent interview with Strangeland Oddities, Haig said that the band had six singles and some radio play, but while “jukebox money was coming in like crazy,” he never saw any of it. So, rather than “bust my ass for nothing,” Haig switched gears and focused on acting. He was 19 years old at the time. "

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
IMO the funniest part of Raw is when Eddie's drunk father is talking about how he had to eat the toys his father brought home from work.
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is I've lost my way. The good news is I'm way ahead of schedule!
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