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The Re-up Thread
Had to share this.


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Ya know, regarding the crap (in mostly jest, I know) that Tim Roth got for taking Planet of the Apes/Thade instead of Snape in Harry Potter...it makes a LOT more sense in the context of when that was. Snape's arc wasn't even complete yet. And this was only ten years after Batman + being a remake of one of the most iconic sci-fi films ever. And he almost assuredly got paid more (for a single movie anyway). Nobody could've known Harry Potter was gonna become THAT big..
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Burton's PotA seems a lot longer ago than that. Like mid 90's long ago.
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I can never forget when it came out because it came out on my 20th birthday. Helped break me in good for the disappointing birthdays to follow..
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Superman Returns on Netflix.

A love-letter to blockbusters from a time gone by and the legacy of Superman as a whole. It's aged gracefully and its funny how it predated the trend for nostalgia-fueled blockbusters. At the time, it was criticized for relying too heavily on nostalgia without being its own thing (which I could not disagree more with). Something that we see more and more of. The first half-hour is Singer recreating the spirit of Donner and the moment after Superman stands in front of Air Force One with the world cheering on his return, it's a full-on Singer film. To its success or failure, depending on your reaction.

There's something cathartic about seeing this again after so many years especially in lieu of Brandon Routh reprising the role on television. Brings back all those memories from the moment it was randomly announced in late July 2004 to its June 2006 release - its what got me back into the Superman lore. Of seeing it at midnight with my best friend and our debates for the remainder of that year (I loved it, he didn't).

Most importantly of all the friendships this film and the conversations associated with it led to including this very forum. I have pinched myself realizing I've become friends with people who worked on it. This film (and the on-again, off-again situation with its ultimately unmade sequel) led me to writing for the movie-news blogging scene... which in itself is what brought my lovely love wife into my life.

I've said if I ever got to meet Bryan Singer (yes, yes, make your quips about the man), I would tell him he made Superman Returns for me and thank him for doing so.

The real ending to Big...
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I'm halfway through a rewatch of THE MATRIX. I haven't seen it in years and it's fun to revisit this.

My big revelation: I forgot how deliberate the dialogue delivery is in this movie. Fishburne, in particular, adopts a very specific and deliberate cadence that provides a fairly otherworldly feeling to the dialogue in general.
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I remember not liking THE MATRIX when I first saw it 20 years ago (shudder), then when I rewatched it I thought "What the HELL was I thinking?"
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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(10-09-2019, 11:54 AM)Mangy Wrote: I remember not liking THE MATRIX when I first saw it 20 years ago (shudder), then when I rewatched it I thought "What the HELL was I thinking?"

I loved it when it came out and took my wife to it when I saw it a second time.  At the time, she was fairly religious, and she really got into the allegorical elements of the film (Neo as Christ, Morpheus as John the Baptist, etc).  She's not a big sci fi person at all, but she appreciated the thought and care that went into the script.

I should be able to finish this off tonight and then dive into RELOADED and...REVOLUTIONS.
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(10-09-2019, 08:15 AM)fraid uh noman Wrote: Ya know, regarding the crap (in mostly jest, I know) that Tim Roth got for taking Planet of the Apes/Thade instead of Snape in Harry Potter...it makes a LOT more sense in the context of when that was. Snape's arc wasn't even complete yet. And this was only ten years after Batman + being a remake of one of the most iconic sci-fi films ever. And he almost assuredly got paid more (for a single movie anyway). Nobody could've known Harry Potter was gonna become THAT big..

For the sake of discussion, I think the Harry Potter books at the time were already on track to break every record this side of The Bible itself. But they were just "children's books" to many still, so that might be it.

I would kinda hope Tim Roth would look at it as the perfect role for Rickman now and regret nothing though. It's poetic really. A great actor who got typecast as villains a lot but really has all the range anyone could ask for gets what we would discover to be an extended swan song in this character. A guy who is almost too obviously a villain type or at least suspicious and intimidating, who seems like "this again" for the actor who plays him. He then turns out to have one of the most conflicted and soulful arcs in the series and so the typecasting is secretly perfection.
It's sad but also great that Snape and Alan Rickman's career mirror each other the way they do. It'd be better if he was still around, of course, but now no one can forget that he wasn't just the villain.
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(10-09-2019, 11:57 AM)Judas Booth Wrote: I loved it when it came out and took my wife to it when I saw it a second time.  At the time, she was fairly religious, and she really got into the allegorical elements of the film (Neo as Christ, Morpheus as John the Baptist, etc).  She's not a big sci fi person at all, but she appreciated the thought and care that went into the script.

You might not want her to watch the other two films, then. The W Siblings make it clear through the film that the "religion" of the Matrix - the myth of the One - is nothing but a means of control. It's a none-too-subtle comment on real world religions (as well as secular institutional systems). One of the things I LOVE about Reloaded and Revolutions is how they reveal all that allegory and myth, which seems so familiar and as if it confirms our own real world myths and beliefs, is nothing but a means to control humans in and out of the Matrix. And even more beautifully, a close watch of the first film confirms the seeds for this reversal were there all along.

There's a bit of wiggle room in that Neo makes some key choices differently than previous Ones...but not much.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

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He does eventually transcend that control though?
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(10-09-2019, 11:33 AM)filmnerdjamie Wrote: Superman Returns on Netflix.

I think SUPERMAN RETURNS is really flawed, but admirably ambitious. Add one more significant action setpiece, slightly dial back the title character's moodiness, and reconceive Lex Luthor's personality (Spacey's balance of trying to ape Hackman's sometime-goofiness with a more direct feeling of menace doesn't work for me AT ALL; I can't picture Hackman's Luthor shanking Superman in a scene that dark, and since it's supposed to be the same character, that's a big disconnect), and I think it would go down a lot better.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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I think if they made the exact same film but without the kid, there would have been a sequel by 2009 as originally planned and announced. With or without Singer and his team behind the camera.

As beautifully as I think it was handled, it proved to be too big a crux for anyone other than Team Singer to have to deal with. It also aged the characters in a way that I think kinda shook fans who wanted them to stay eternally young. When in fact the presence of the kid is a symbol for how the world moved on after Superman vanished.

The real ending to Big...
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Aliens, on the big screen at the AFI Silver Theatre in Silver Spring, Md. It's been one of my favorite movies since childhood, but I don't think I'd seen it for a few years before last night. And it's somehow even better than I remember it. The world building and character work is effortless and economical. Other than compositing shots of the drop ships, the special effects are still fantastic. (Not that the iffy compositing actually bothers me; it was great for 1986, and I'm not one to complain that I can see a puppet's strings.) What hit me differently on this viewing, and honestly hit me pretty hard, was the stuff between Ripley and Newt. It adds so many more layers to Ripley as a character (even without the on-the-nose added material about her daughter). I'm not a parent, but I'm getting into "parent age," and the tenderness and protectiveness that organically grows between them just hit me like a ton of bricks this time in a way they hadn't on previous viewings.

That was a big part of my coming to the conclusion that Ellen Ripley might be the greatest action-movie protagonist I can think of. She's capable, determined, humble enough to acknowledge her limitations and try to address the trauma she's experienced, tough-minded without losing her compassion, nurturing and patient with a vulnerable character like Newt while not taking any bullshit from the likes of Burke, Gorman, or Hudson, and fiercely, fanatically protective of her new "daughter." As great as the action itself is at the end with her rescue of Newt and then the final fight with the Queen, seeing Ripley fully, unapologetically going into mama-bear mode in those scenes makes them even greater. If I ever become a parent, I hope I'm even half the parent that Ripley is. What an amazing character, and what an amazing movie.
Originally posted by Schwartz on Cool as Ice ("When a girl has a heart of stone, there's only one way to melt it. Just add Ice."):
"It's not just a mixed metaphor, or that the stone is one that is melting...but the ice is actually making it melt. (kisses fingers) Magnifique."
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I'm more and more convinced that the scene that really solidifies Ripley as 'the best' for me is the brief scene between her and Hicks where he walks her through the specifics of how to use the M41-A pulse rifle. When he starts the training, she has this look of 'ok, I can do this.' It's great acting from Sigourney. You cut away for the bulk of the training but come back for the end. At this point, she's been told what to do and now she's SHOWING Hicks that she's got it. At the end, she asks about the grenade launcher. Hicks tries to blow it off...she's not having it. 'You started this...show me everything.' Notice the sly smile on her face.

It's a great character moment and a great transitional moment in general for her character. From that point on, she's armed and carries the rifle like she knows what she's doing. She finally gets to fire it when the aliens attack (when they lose Hudson). She has a moment of confusion before getting it right, blasting the alien and saving herself and Newt.

It's a great progression of character. She accepts the rifle and accepts the training. She doesn't half ass the training and demands to know everything. When forced to act, she stumbles but eventually does what needs to be done. All of that makes her resolve to go back and get Newt in the climax all the more powerful...she's a novice but she's shown that she CAN do it. Great stuff.
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Biehn's fantastic in that scene as well.

Yesterday was Sigourney's 70th. Helluva way to celebrate her birthday.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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Biehn was great in the whole movie, and he had great chemistry with Weaver.
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It's too bad nobody gets the "close encounters' joke anymore.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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(10-10-2019, 02:09 PM)hammerhead Wrote: It's too bad nobody gets the "close encounters' joke anymore.

Hicks is gonna shotgun some star-children to the face.
Originally posted by Schwartz on Cool as Ice ("When a girl has a heart of stone, there's only one way to melt it. Just add Ice."):
"It's not just a mixed metaphor, or that the stone is one that is melting...but the ice is actually making it melt. (kisses fingers) Magnifique."
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Nobody gets it? I dunno..
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(10-09-2019, 12:36 PM)fraid uh noman Wrote: He does eventually transcend that control though?

Does he, though, in the end?  He definitely dies a martyr's death in order to save humanity from his evil opposite.  He ironically makes his own crucifixion necessary by transcending the system's control, which inspires Smith to transcend it as well.  Maybe it's the fact that he's able to trade his life (and the life of the transcendent Smith) for the lives of the rest of the human race that sets him apart from the previous Messiahs.  


Which makes Neo's status as special, even among the Matrix's heroes, dependent on having inspired his villain to become great?
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(10-10-2019, 02:50 PM)fraid uh noman Wrote: Nobody gets it? I dunno..

Present company excepted, of course. The last time I saw the movie with a crowd that line fell flat.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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That astounds me that that line has become passé..
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Even almost thirty years later and after being wholly absorbed by pop culture and ripoffs and homages and watered-down versions and total rejections, it's incredible that Silence of the Lambs retains such power, and yet it does. Demme's empathetic gifts as a director, Foster's groundedness, Hopkins' detachment, Tally's careful details, and Fujimoto's quiet observational skills have rarely been better deployed individually, together they are a symphony of suspense. Fujimoto's work, in particular, is underrated - it's shocking that he was left out entirely of the Oscar conversation in the film. Those down-the-barrel shots of Clarice and Lecter looking right at the camera are electrifying, and yet he's also able to quietly and sympathetically keep our attention on Clarice's struggle with the male gaze throughout (the film makes the moment in the elevator when she's surrounded by much taller men, or her ordering the West Virginian deputies out of the autopsy room as important as her dogged detective work tracking down Bill). There's a perfect simplicity to this film.
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LIFEFORCE. I grabbed this from Shout factory during their recent sale. It comes with both the theatrical cut and the much longer international cut of the film...as I'd never seen the longer cut, I watched that.

Nothing is going to change the fact that Steven Railsback is a flat out terrible actor, so that's one ding against the film that the longer cut isn't going to fix. However, there's a lot of new stuff in the opening sequence on the space shuttle that lets the breakneck pacing of the theatrical cut breathe a bit. There's other stuff here and there throughout the film that help to explain things a bit better so that shit makes a bit more sense, but the plot is still pretty stupid in a B-movie kinda way. It's all watchable and entertaining schlock, though.

Not sure if there was any new footage of Mathilda May.
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I agree so much with you about Railsback, Judas. He single-handedly killed THE STUNT MAN for me.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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He worked for me much better in THE STUNT MAN. Also, Peter O'Toole is so damned good in the movie that you can kinda don't care about anyone else.
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I enjoyed Railsback as alcoholic private-eye Jack Manning in the PM Entertainment production PRIVATE WARS.
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I thought he was good as Duane Barry on The X-Files. That role required him to be a complete nutter. I agree he overdid it to the Nth degree in LIFEFORCE, though.
Mangy Wrote:TCM 2 is like sentient cocaine.
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What I like about Lifeforce is that its batshit craziness is played straight. I don't have a problem with Railsback in it. The British cast members are good though. They make Lifeforce a classy B movie.
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is I've lost my way. The good news is I'm way ahead of schedule!
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Brotherhood of the Wolf is pretty damn awesome. Aside from the slightly questionable casting of Mark Dacoscos. Not that he's bad. He's really good. But....as an Indian? I really like the guy who plays Fronsac as well. Don't know that I've ever seen him in anything else. He looks like some uncanny cross between the Merovingian and Triple H. Anyways...probably my favorite French language film. And certainly my favorite French language, horror, martial arts, period piece based on a true story..
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Dacascos plays a Native American in that film.

Haven’t seen Brotherhood of the Wolf in a long time but thought it was a decent film back in the day. I actually saw it due to CHUD’s recommendation.
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I know. But an indigenous person from Canada I think. That's why I called him an Indian instead of a Native American. I knew he wasn't from India..
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Ah yes...David Lee Roth vs werewolves with the best scene transition of all time (Belucci into mountains).
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Van Halen meets Van Helsing.

That scene transition is stunning (as is Bellucci). I think I was actually more enamored of the lady Fronsac falls in love with. She is GORGEOUS.

There's a great region free Korean blu of the film (which is how I watched it). With English menus and subtitles and everything!
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