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PARASITE (Bong Joon Ho)
#71
Is this the place to talk about this fucking movie?? Can someone please get with me on the brutalizing, immediate subtext of this thing? It's vanishingly rare to see a movie so universally praised; it wanders into concerning, that maybe I was watching something completely different. Is that the exercise?

Going in absolutely blind - it's in Korean, it's apparently really fucking good, it's not what you might think - I am looking for something. Anything, really, that might give some clue as to where we are going with this. I'm there with my wife, and she hates Kafka more than anything. Its revolting to her, and so I am rolling the dice here. The movie is called 'Parasite', stink bugs and fumigation are laid out almost immediately. Ah shit is this what we're doing?

And then it's a burn - not a slow burn, but an intense one, waiting for the moment when things snap into place and the farcial conspiracy of this infiltrator-ass family gives way to something more. Be careful what you ask for, I guess.

One thing sets my teeth on my edge, early in the film: Kevin looks at something innocuous (I don't even remember what the hell it was), and says "this is like a metaphor." You know what else is like a metaphor? The Fucking Metamorphosis. Someone is getting turned into a bug.

But in case we missed it out here in the audience, shortly thereafter Kevin points and says "this is a metaphor." Does he qualify it with 'like'? Maybe, someone help me out if so. And maybe that's just Kevin's thing. He thinks everything is a metaphor. OR - I tuck this behind my ear, and lean forward in my seat - Kevin is telling us something live and direct. This goofball Buster Keaton ass story is a metaphor for .... Something. But what? The panty plot, the sitcom-level peach allergy, engineering the faithful housekeepers oyster, the budding romance between a tutor and his high-schools pupil; this shit sucks. This is really the level? I can't believe it. I'm waiting for someone to turn into a cockroach.

The kid is weird. If something interesting is gonna happen, that's the vector. And he's obsessed with Indians. His toy arrows were imported from the US. This is something. Perhaps this is a metaphor. The dialog lingers; am I being imperialist in drawing this connection between America and Korea? Can't Koreans just be Korean without the US military stumbling into frame?

It passes, the Kims go on a camping trip, the working class con artists wrap themselves in the imagined status of the family, almost managing to convince themselves that they have replaced their wealthy patrons. Okay, the Parasite is like a metaphor, this is some class war shit, what's more late-stage capitalist than watching a movie about the aspirational poor being exploited by the rich even as they hustle and scheme a tiny slice of that pie for themselves. Read your Marx, kids.

Crack of lighting, on cue, and the exiled housekeeper returns in the middle of the downpour pleading for a mercy. They go into a sketchy ass cellar, ah shit here we go. Ghosts, right? Or is she actually a bug? We're doing the metaphor thing, right?

Slapstick bullshit, her beloved has been down there the whole time, the conspiracy is captured on video (shout-out LG, there's no way they actually paid for product placement in a movie seething with class envy, right?), now the Kims are being blackmailed. Where the fuck is this going?

Housekeeper decides to throw down a mean impression of the popularized North Korean propaganda news anchor. And she does look kinda ... North Korean doesnt she? Am I racist? Her husband also looked kind of malnourished. And now she's straight-up hailing the glory of Kim Jong Un.

This is a metaphor.

No fucking way.

The Park family returns home and we get a shitshow montage, the unruly North Koreans are bottled up in the cellar, the parasitic wreck the Kims made of their wealthy benefactors mess is swept under the table. The Kims are trapped under a table, but it's not shot like they're under a table. It's framed like they're hiding under the floorboards. Oh, so metaphorical cockroaches. Right? That's kinda fucked up.

The weirdo kid decides to post up outside in a teepee. His parents will watch over him. It really is kind of hard to disassociate the teepee from bedrock American folklore, innit? There's no way the Parks are hosting an American military presence on their property. That's not a metaphor. It can't be the metaphor, it's way too on the nose. And you aren't gonna lock up the North Korean faction up in the cellar without any food. Or kick the lady down the stairs. Are we talking about class tensions here, or Korean tensions? Is this like a metaphor, or is it a metaphor? Park is one of the most common surnames in this country, any resemblance to Park Chung Hee is entirely my own imagination. After all, President Park was assassinated by the director of the Korean CIA, Kim Jae-gyu. Kim is maybe the single most common surnames in the world, Mr. Kim in this movie is a hustler, there is no relationship. The American teepee, the North Koreans in the cellar, Mr. Park and Mr. Kim - this is all static. We are being misled, to make the transformation into a cockroach Even more startling.

The Kims escape, and their home has been flooded. There is horrific imagery and the waters rise, theres the magic rock - what does it mean? They end up in a crowded gym, filled with other displaced citizens, internal refugees all. This is a metaphor?

Kevin asks his dad what the plan is. Mr. Kim replies that having a plan is stupid, it will only end in failure, it is best to have no plan. OK, Kim. Class war, the history of the Korean conflict, and also climate change. Maybe Kevin was just fucking with us. These aren't metaphors. You can't tie this up in a way that makes sense.

At this point in the movie, I stop enjoying it. Fullstop. I am filled with dread and unease, and this fucking movie is daring me to take any part of it at face value. It's stressful. Where's the man-bug? We're gonna step back from the psychohistory, right?

Nah. Actually, it's all in. Dressing up like injuns, arranging the tables in a military formation, the imprisoned guy in the cellar bouncing out Morse code in a cry for help. Kim kills Park, but that's not a metaphor. It's right there. The beautiful, wealthy elites are throwing themselves a party while literal climate refugees seethe in rage at them but this is all projection on my part.

The moving parts are hard to handle. Who is the parasite? What is the parasite? Is it the guy living off of crumbs in the cellar? Is it the infiltrator Kims? Or the oblivious Parks, blinded by luxury to the desperation just below? Or maybe the American military-industrial complex, seeing the world through the prism of Cowboys and Indians? Are we the parasites? Is this the kind of thing that should entertain us? Is it a metaphor or not, Kevin? Which fucking part?

The movie ends with Kevin putting the sacred rock back into the river. But it's just a fiction, he got his head bashed in by the rock, he doesn't have the rock anymore. If that's the metaphor, Kevin, I gotta please ignorance. I don't know what that means.

But he has a plan. He will get rich, earn money, become wealthy enough to buy this entire scratch of dirt. And he will be re-united with his beloved father, all he has to do is step forward into their embrace.

Okay fuckers, this is an idealized reunification scenario between North and South, I may be confused but I'm not dumb. It's a metaphor. I appreciate the heads up.

But nah, it's just a dream, Kevin's mom has hung herself - I wanna say it's better than starving. And it's snowing outside, which I'm sure is a thing, no reason to jump to the conclusion that it's some kind of nuclear winter. And yeah there are definitely emergency alarms blasting in the background in the refugee gym scene, but that's just setting the tone. It could be for the flooding. Has nothing to do with the housekeepers cosplay of a North Korean propaganda minister joyfully announcing the launch of a nuclear missile, to settle this shit one way or another. It's either like a metaphor, or it is a metaphor, or it's not a metaphor. I don't fucking know. Whatever it is, I am pretty sure it's intentional. The intent is there. Once you start picking at it, you won't stop.

Jessica gets stabbed, and dies. I realize I just juked that entire thing but is that a metaphor too? Is she a character or a stand-in or both? Doesn't South Korea have a very well-known problem with conformist self-image? Does Jessica look like a K-Pop idol or do all pretty Korean girls look like K-Pop idols to me? When the fuck did I learn all this incidental shit about Korea anyway? Am I gosu? Is there someone playing StarCraft on one of.the monitors in the bang? Is that caricature, or racist, or metaphor? Or is that some shit I just imagined, but I'm gonna stand here and assure you the rest of this hot mess is defensible?

There's almost too much yammed in there. Like I said, I didn't really enjoy it at a certain point because it became impossible to disentangle the subtext from the pretext from the context. I don't think it's a me issue, I watched the Art of Self-Defense a couple weeks ago and thought it was hilarious. Particularly the resolution. But anyone who has seen that can pretty quickly jive to the undertow of toxic masculinity that movie traded in. It's an agreed-upon interpretation.

I don't know to what degree my interpretation of Parasite can be considered valid. That the movie flat-out riffs on the 'phrenia? And then proceeded to tangle up the pattern recognition with a thousand occluded intersections
...

Most everyone seems to be responding to it as a work of genius. It's pedigree, at this point and time, is fucking pristine. But are we responding to the same things? Is our response to any particular element revealing of the way we look at the world? And if that's the point, what kind of mind can even concieve such a project?

I am deeply unsettled by the whole thing. In that regard, it may be the most reflective piece of art in this year 2019. Everything is deeply unsettling, and gets ever more so with each passing day.
The sky above the port was the color of television, tuned to a dead channel.
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#72
Zhukov, I want to print that post out, frame it, and read it aloud to family members at holiday gatherings.

I think you're right about how many layers this complex movie has, and I think that has something to do with how universal the acclaim for the picture has been.  There's something for everyone to grab a hold of here.

One of my favorite elements is how the way in which the Kims treat the housekeeper when she intrudes on their drunken dinner at the Park house reflects the upper class' hostility to the poor.  They view the housekeeper as a threat, as someone who could drag them back down to her level by exposing the fraud that allowed them to live like suburban aristocrats.  Yeah, that's probably a metaphor.
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#73
The fact that I've heard people talk about this movie in various bars in NYC proves this is the movie of 2019.

(11-16-2019, 11:13 AM)Reasor Wrote: Zhukov, I want to print that post out, frame it, and read it aloud to family members at holiday gatherings.

I think you're right about how many layers this complex movie has, and I think that has something to do with how universal the acclaim for the picture has been.  There's something for everyone to grab a hold of here.

One of my favorite elements is how the way in which the Kims treat the housekeeper when she intrudes on their drunken dinner at the Park house reflects the upper class' hostility to the poor.  They view the housekeeper as a threat, as someone who could drag them back down to her level by exposing the fraud that allowed them to live like suburban aristocrats.  Yeah, that's probably a metaphor.

It's what happens to people who live in poverty in capitalism: If you get any opportunity, you pull that ladder up and believe in that self-serving narrative that you and you alone brought yourself up by the bootstraps.
"Why did she do it?"
"Why are you the fucking Police?"

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#74
New South Korean film. You should see it.

Bleak tragicomedy--or, more to the point, pitch-black dark comedy for a while before transforming into full-scale pitiless, courageous tragedy--about the needy battling for scraps from the rich in the South Korea of today. We do not really like the characters but we cannot stop watching the entire situation unfold in quiet, spellbound horror.

May be the most piercing film about class in decades, from anywhere.

I kept myself in the dark because I didn't want to know anything about it. All I knew was who directed it and that it seemed to be a "genre-hopper" film, which is not surprising.

The shift in power dynamics between the housekeeper and the Kims during the extended pivotal sequence with the smart phone at the center of it are some bleak, Luis Bunuel-level black-as-pitch comedy.

And the Hitchcockian suspense is pretty amazingly stitched together. There were times where I thought I knew right where it was going and it felt like the film was confirming my suspicions, and then it turned out that those suspicions were misdirected (brilliantly). There is one character-based element that builds and builds gradually that is so, well, no pun intended, rich.
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#75
I’m so fascinated by zhukov’s reaction to the film! It’s tumultuous!
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#76
(11-17-2019, 05:40 AM)noirheaven Wrote: New South Korean film. You should see it.

Bleak tragicomedy--or, more to the point, pitch-black dark comedy for a while before transforming into full-scale pitiless, courageous tragedy--about the needy battling for scraps from the rich in the South Korea of today. We do not really  like the characters but we cannot stop watching the entire situation unfold in quiet, spellbound horror.

May be the most piercing film about class in decades, from anywhere.

I kept myself in the dark because I didn't want to know anything about it. All I knew was who directed it and that it seemed to be a "genre-hopper" film, which is not surprising.

The shift in power dynamics between the housekeeper and the Kims during the extended pivotal sequence with the smart phone at the center of it are some bleak, Luis Bunuel-level black-as-pitch comedy.

And the Hitchcockian suspense is pretty amazingly stitched together. There were times where I thought I knew right where it was going and it felt like the film was confirming my suspicions, and then it turned out that those suspicions were misdirected (brilliantly). There is one character-based element that builds and builds gradually that is so, well, no pun intended, rich.

And what's even better is that it says so much in as little time as possible.  You know an American film would have dragged it out just to make sure that people in the back got it.
"Why did she do it?"
"Why are you the fucking Police?"

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#77
Wow wow wow wow wow. This might be in my top five for the decade. So glad I went in blind on this.

Snowpiercer is the only other Bong Joon-ho I've seen. I need to fix that.
"PREDATOR 2 feels like it was penned by convicts as part of a correctional facility's creative writing program, and that's what I love about it." - Moltisanti
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#78
MEMORIES OF MURDER, THE HOST, MOTHER, OKJA . . . all of these need to be seen.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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#79
https://theplaylist.net/neon-memories-mu...-20191119/
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#80
Excellent news. Song Kang Ho's leaping drop kick needs to be witnessed on the biggest AMC multiplex screen possible.
The most important thing in life is broads. Broads!
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#81
Good news. Memories is incredible, even if I do feel that Parasite's eclipsed it as his masterpiece.
I might have been born yesterday sir, but I stayed up all night!
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#82
(11-20-2019, 05:02 AM)Evi Wrote: Good news. Memories is incredible, even if I do feel that Parasite's eclipsed it as his masterpiece.

Glad to see someone else thinks this.  Everyone's been calling me a lunatic for daring to say I think he may have finally topped Memories.
Not a hard man to track. Leaves dead men wherever he goes.
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#83
I'm just going to have to keep watching both of them multiple times until I figure out which is better.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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#84
Memories is a nostalgic favorite

Parasite is a very recent one

enough rankings and lists you buncha baboons!!
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#85
So surprised I had a theater playing this in town. So grateful I went in blind.
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#86
Big Grin 
[Image: mania-done-20200104092209_btcovcff.jpg]

This picture just makes me happy.
The most important thing in life is broads. Broads!
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#87
that's cool!
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#88
Hey this was pretty fun! And thrilling! What a rollercoaster.

That’s all I have to say.
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#89
Just came back from a viewing at my local AMC (the house was surprisingly packed - I guess all the Golden Globes and other awards buzz is having an effect) and everything clicked a lot more for me this time. I was even moved by the scene where SKH tries to salvage what he can from their flooded basement home. His expression as he takes one last look before evacuating was almost devastating. I was definitely with him this time whereas I found him too out there/repulsive in my initial viewing.

Goddamn though, Park So Dam as Ki-Jeong/Jessica is still my MVP. Too bad she couldn't make the Golden Globes ceremony to light up the joint.

Good reactions overall from the pretty diverse audience, especially during the part where Park talks to his wife about finding the panties inside his car. And the kick/fall drew loud gasps.
The most important thing in life is broads. Broads!
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#90
(01-08-2020, 02:49 AM)isao kanemasa Wrote: Just came back from a viewing at my local AMC (the house was surprisingly packed - I guess all the Golden Globes and other awards buzz is having an effect) and everything clicked a lot more for me this time.  I was even moved by the scene where SKH tries to salvage what he can from their flooded basement home.  His expression as he takes one last look before evacuating was almost devastating.  I was definitely with him this time whereas I found him too out there/repulsive in my initial viewing.

Goddamn though, Park So Dam as Ki-Jeong/Jessica is still my MVP.  Too bad she couldn't make the Golden Globes ceremony to light up the joint.

Good reactions overall from the pretty diverse audience, especially during the part where Park talks to his wife about finding the panties inside his car.  And the kick/fall drew loud gasps.

The think I love about SK cinema is that they know how to film things so you feel the maximum weight when violence happens.

Both the kick and the kid getting his head smashed in with the rock are both bloodless and incredibly hard to watch.
"Why did she do it?"
"Why are you the fucking Police?"

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#91
There's actually a pretty cool shot after the second stone drop (yup, gasps heard there as well) where you see his blood and the juice from the broken jar mix on the floor right by his head.

You know the theater is full of enthusiastic cinemaphiles when some teenager in the front row looked at her phone for a brief second during the start of the film and there were multiple people yelling out to shut off her phone. I truly missed what that felt like - being among my people.
The most important thing in life is broads. Broads!
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#92
Oh, fuck off Adam McKay. Go do a movie about how Bill O'Reilly never tips his pizza delivery guy, or that time somebody forgot to flush a poop in the Fox News bathroom in 2007. Leave Parasite alone, it already exists in it's purest form.

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-v...bo-1268397
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#93
gross
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#94
At least he's getting back to comedy instead of doing another shit important message movie.
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#95
I don’t see him making a comedy out of this.

I imagine he wants to use it to make something IMPORTANT again
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#96
(01-10-2020, 12:07 AM)Nooj Wrote: I don’t see him making a comedy out of this.

No? You don't think the families will chase each other around the dinner table while Yakety Sax plays?
“I call upon you to stop this musical now,” she said to the board. “You tear a community apart if you don’t.” -Prachi Ruina                                                            
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#97
I see him having celebrities giving 4th wall breaking lectures about economic equality
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#98
I don't think this ever needs to be remade but it seems a lot of people who're weirded out by this haven't seen SUCCESSION.
I might have been born yesterday sir, but I stayed up all night!
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#99
I have not! Until today, I had no idea he was even involved!
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(01-09-2020, 07:00 PM)kyle reese 2 Wrote: Oh, fuck off Adam McKay. Go do a movie about how Bill O'Reilly never tips his pizza delivery guy, or that time somebody forgot to flush a poop in the Fox News bathroom in 2007. Leave Parasite alone, it already exists in it's purest form.

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-v...bo-1268397

I'm pretty sure McKay and Bong are working on this project together? Fuck 'em both I guess?
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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Yeah, I mean its not like this remake is any more necessary than any other, but the vitriol seems equally unnecessary. Mckay seems as good a fit as anyone if it has to happen, if anything I'd worry that given his proclivities he will make the rich family into complete one-dimensional douchebags.
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I'm curious to see how the SNOWPIERCER series turned out to see how much input Bong has w/ his TV remakes.
The most important thing in life is broads. Broads!
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Bong might as well cash the check and get the EP credit if it was going to get remade by somebody anyways.
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Loved it. One of my top three of the year easily, and I suspect it will bubble up to number 1 with ease.

So much to meditate on.
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oh jessica nice
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