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The Re-up Thread
Saw Dirty Harry fairly recently, and what struck me is how, let's not say dated, but specific to its time it is in terms of its villain. Scorpio isn't so much a character as a grab bag of everything that was terrifying the Establishment about these Hippie people. Some of his crimes mirror real-life incidents-- the Zodiac, the UT tower shooter. Strangely, the school-bus episode actually anticipates the Chowchilla kidnapping.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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Always loved the Fouchon/Van Cleef double duo in HARD TARGET.  Vosloo does a most impressive leaping somersault/shoulder roll (over actual fire - the South African military don't fuck around) during the Mardi Gras warehouse sequence that wasn't adequately showcased in the final film but can be seen in the 20 second mark:



The most important thing in life is broads. Broads!
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Henriksen doing that fire stunt is just incredible.
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(01-02-2020, 12:24 PM)MichaelM Wrote: HARD TARGET makes me sad about Yancy Butler.

Loved her Witchblade TV Series.


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I've had my blu of the ESPN doc "O.J.: Made In America" for about 5 months. I'm finally getting to it this weekend.

As warm up, I took my Netflix disc of "June 17, 1994" to watch with my Dad. About my third viewing, but it was my pop's first, and it bowled him over.

It's brilliantly edited, and there are parts that still move me, parts that still make me laugh, and parts that still make me realize how doomed we are as a civilization.

Checking Wikipedia, I see the director also made THE KID STAYS IN THE PICTURE, MONTAGE OF HECK, and CROSSFIRE HURRICANE.

I've had his CHICAGO 10 in my queue for over a year. I think I'm bumping it up tonite!

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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Watched ARRIVAL (2016) last night.

Still wows me, moves me, and inspires me. Easily one of the best SF movies in the last decade. Maybe of this century, thus far. Amy Adams is doing fantastic work here, in lovely tandem with DV's direction, the lensing, and the music. The opening montage, which takes on greater meaning near the film's conclusion, is itself a lovely gutpunch. Plus nearly perfect effects and choices for what we do and don't see.

The 2010s gave us EX MACHINA, ARRIVAL, ANNIHILATION, and more. A great decade for thoughtful SF movies.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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I should probably revisit ARRIVAL at some point, because I was utterly unmoved by it in the theater. Maybe I was in a bad mood that day, or something.

I do agree it was a good decade for science fiction.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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I can imagine it not having a huge impact on you if you don't have kids (and I can't recall if you do or don't, Belloq!).
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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I certainly don't! And I'm sure that plays a role.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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(01-04-2020, 11:38 AM)MichaelM Wrote: The 2010s gave us EX MACHINA, ARRIVAL, ANNIHILATION, and more. A great decade for thoughtful SF movies.

Don't forget BLADE RUNNER 2049.
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I'm on the fence about BR2049. I admire it but personally can't call it great. Good, yes. Ambitious, yes.

I like it better than the original film, though.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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No love for Gravity? It's the one I rewatch the most.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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GRAVITY's a weird one, because I don't really consider it science fiction. It is fiction, and it involves science, but I'd put it more in a category with something like APOLLO 13. A plausible space disaster film.

THE MARTIAN's kind of similar, though I'm more comfortable classifying it as science fiction because it depicts things we've not yet achieved.

I think both GRAVITY and THE MARTIAN are quite good.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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I adore GRAVITY, but "plausible"? Ehhhh...

I do think it's amazing though.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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I mean it's set in present day without any futuristic technology or conceits.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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Sciency fiction.
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Yeah, films like Gravity and The Martian are right down the middle for what I consider "science fiction." And, I suppose, Interstellar, although the science is really awkwardly presented.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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I think INTERSTELLAR easily qualifies as SF, since it involves future humans manipulating gravity, time, and space.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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Catching up since the new year:

Wall Street - Connected with me *remarkably* as an adult where it didn't as a teenager. A love-hate letter to New York's opulence, Stone's voracious direction brings the chaos of the financial district alive. Michael Douglas is about 60 percent of the scenery. Charlie Sheen can really sell going from hotshot to gullible sort-of criminal. Stewart Copeland's score is dynamite, but the real magic is any time David Byrne's voice comes on the soundtrack.

Light Sleeper - Paul Schrader's best film as a director, one that firmly pits conscience against amorality with hard consequences. Might be Willem Dafoe's best performance, great work from Susan Sarandon coming right off Thelma & Louise, wonderful who's-who of character players.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (1990) - Surprisingly holds up. It helps that the PG rating doesn't candy-color every frame. Immersive production design that you'd never suspect New York City was actually some soundstages in North Carolina. Sam Rockwell's bit part is never not funny.

Road House - If it wasn't for Swayze and the game cast saying the shit that's written and the cool blues rock and the fact that Dean Cundey chose to make this as his followup to Roger Rabbit, yeah, we'd think this movie was a joke. It ain't.

The Toxic Avenger - I can't deal with the dog getting shot, but I haven't lost my juvenile love of this movie's nurturing DIY mayhem.

And then I began doing a chronological viewing of Steven Seagal movies with a friend...

Above the Law - Super, super fucking awesome. You really get the hang of the changing of the guard on 80's action movies. The plot could be a little less tangled - why, yes, the CIA is funding the Mafia who is funding all the drugs coming into the city! - but Seagal has a legitimate presence as an actor, something he wouldn't really gain again, but it's another great example of how straying away from Greek-god action heroes at the end of the 80's worked.

Hard to Kill - Besides the blood bank line and a few notable moments of bone-snapping, I still don't like it. Long stretches of nothing happening and they don't even kill the bad guy! Seriously?

Marked for Death - Seagal's most awesome movie to this point. The Jamaican villains aren't PC and super, super, super silly, but the breakneck pacing and feats of strength/badassery by the Sensei are just goddamn awesome. Plus, it's almost like they apologized for Bill Sadler not getting taken to the blood bank in Hard to Kill because the bad guy gets killed four times (five if you count his surprise twin).
"PREDATOR 2 feels like it was penned by convicts as part of a correctional facility's creative writing program, and that's what I love about it." - Moltisanti
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I remember really liking Light Sleeper. Good to hear it holds up.

(01-05-2020, 07:11 PM)hammerhead Wrote: Yeah, films like Gravity and The Martian are right down the middle for what I consider "science fiction." And, I suppose, Interstellar, although the science is really awkwardly presented.

(01-05-2020, 08:49 PM)MichaelM Wrote: I think INTERSTELLAR easily qualifies as SF, since it involves future humans manipulating gravity, time, and space.

It's definitely sci-fi, what with its predictions of ecological catastrophe and its breakthrough visualization of a black hole. But it's not as down-the-middle as the other two, for me anyway, due to the massive handwave about "solving for gravity."
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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TERROR TRAIN: I've always loved this one. Underrated entry from the Jamie Lee scream queen era. This time out somehow I forgot the final twist. It's the most Agatha Christie of the golden age slashers. Back in the day it worked as a party movie.

Performance to Savor: Hart Bochner- he's in absolute jerk mode- performance plays almost as Ellis the college years.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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(01-02-2020, 12:11 PM)arjen rudd Wrote: My wife and I rang in the New Year with Hard Target! And while I still enjoyed it quite a bit, I think I may have built it up in my head a bit since the 90s. It’s great for a VanDamne film. The clear highlight is Henriksen and Vosloo, with performances that feel like Robocop villains. And of course, Woo having a blast with Louisiana swamp iconography. The motorcycle jousting against an SUV sequence and the Madrid Gras factory finale are delirious.

I watched it again last year and I gotta say that while a lot of the awesome stuff I remembered happens later, I probably dug it more than I did when I first saw it.

Molt is right in that it’s easily among Woo’s best overall.
"PREDATOR 2 feels like it was penned by convicts as part of a correctional facility's creative writing program, and that's what I love about it." - Moltisanti
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(01-06-2020, 05:10 AM)Fat Elvis Wrote: TERROR TRAIN: I've always loved this one. Underrated entry from the Jamie Lee scream queen era. This time out somehow I forgot the final twist. It's the most Agatha Christie of the golden age slashers. Back in the day it worked as a party movie.

Performance to Savor: Hart Bochner- he's in absolute jerk mode- performance plays almost as Ellis the college years.

I agree this one's kind of underrated.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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If you were wondering, in 2020, if there’s any earthly reason to revisit 1996’s Twister, allow me to confirm the answer is a definitive No. it’s probably been twenty years since my last viewing, and my goodness, this is trash. The effects work might have been something when it was released, but not today. Take that away, and you’ve got nothing but a really poor James Cameron facsimile with zero stakes at all. I kept waiting for something to escalate, someone to say ‘oh no, we’re trapped here because of the tornado!’ Nope, the heroes just hear where the next tornado is, all jump in a car and drive to it, and oh no, we’re getting too close, but everything ends up OK, rinse, repeat. They don’t even give us any Stephen Sommers-style death scenes.

On the positive side, Helen Hunt and Bill Paxton look really good in this.
Brigadier Cousins on PSN
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Yes, that white tanktop overrides a multitude of weaknesses.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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I think TWISTER is incredibly fun. One of my favorite '90s blockbusters.

Yes, I'm serious.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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Have you seen it recently? Because white tank top really is the best thing it’s got going for it.
Brigadier Cousins on PSN
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I rewatch it almost every year! I'm fascinated by tornadoes, I like the cast (the supporting bench is DEEP), I like the goofy "science," and I think the effects setpieces find ways to do different things with the tornadoes. And Mark Mancina's score is fantastic, too.

I'm not saying I think it's objectively great, because it's not, but I get a ton of personal enjoyment out of it.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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The score is good. Made me wish people were composing recognizable themes today. What kind of a world are we living in, where the stormchasers from Twister have a leitmotif and Captain America doesn’t?
Brigadier Cousins on PSN
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TWISTER absolutely rules. It's almost as perfectly 90's a studio blockbuster as SPEED. There's a warm spirit to it, and it's just fun.

god Philip Seymour Hoffman

[Image: tumblr_inline_o7dnrpWII21s9x8us_540.gif]

[Image: 523b8b6f6c7f79b6fbfc60edb93ee657.gif]

Legend.

If anyone wants to link to the Bill Paxton Random Roles, he had an AMAZING idea for a sequel. Alas, not to be.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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Hoffman, god, it’s like hiring Beethoven to play Hot Crossed Buns three times and then leave. Without a ridiculous death scene.
Brigadier Cousins on PSN
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I finally got around to watching The Taking of Pelham One Two Three after it was getting bandied about a few months back, and WOW was this an enlightening revisit.

This is a perfect movie for the same reasons Die Hard and Speed are. There's no time for bullshit. You have some exposition, but it's all about the spectacle of the major action sequence. Through that, we get a microcosm of a major city and the eclectic crowd of cityfolk and bureaucrats trying to reason with a crisis in unglamorous 1970's New York. It's 70's cynicism at its finest, with tons of dark humor threaded through the performances (especially an unstoppable Walter Matthau). More important is the sense of danger that permeates. The slicker the movie looks, the safer off the characters are.

Not only that, but Robert Shaw's performance as Mr. Blue is the kind of guy you wouldn't want to meet in real life. Is he a better villain than Hans Gruber or Howard Payne? Debatable. But I would be far more terrified of Blue.

They don't end movies like that anymore.
"PREDATOR 2 feels like it was penned by convicts as part of a correctional facility's creative writing program, and that's what I love about it." - Moltisanti
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AWWW YEAAAH

I was pretty confident PELHAM would be your jam, hunter. And I agree with you about it being on the level of DIE HARD. The film is 46 years old and still feels modern, fresh, and relevant.

Gonna have to watch it again myself, I think.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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I’ve seen it before, Michael - I just blipped on rewatching it.

Started the remake while waiting to prep dinner and it’s entertaining, but it doesn’t have the same swagger.
"PREDATOR 2 feels like it was penned by convicts as part of a correctional facility's creative writing program, and that's what I love about it." - Moltisanti
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Denzel is wasted in it. Travolta's an unintentional joke in it.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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