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Film Critic Catch-All
(For Your Consideration)


The 2019 Jim Ridley Film Poll


Dedicated to late Scene editor and critic Jim Ridley, our poll asks critics, cinephiles and industry insiders about the year in film


https://www.nashvillescene.com/arts-cult...-film-poll


"Every year, we at the Scene poll a diverse assemblage of film fans, critics and experts about their favorite flicks of the year, and we present our findings in the Jim Ridley Film Poll — named for the Scene’s late, great editor and brilliant film writer. Below, find the top 25 films of the year according to some of the country’s sharpest film buffs, and read their responses to our questions."

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
(For Your Consideration)

A re-run, but an interesting conversation piece.

Every Oscar Best Picture Winner, Ranked

Consider this project part cathartic exorcism and part sheepish capitulation to the role the Oscars have played in our lives

https://www.slantmagazine.com/film/every...t-to-best/

"It’s a rare type of cinephile who wasn’t introduced to the idea of film as more than just idle entertainment by the ritual of the Academy Awards. And it’s an even rarer type of cinephile who didn’t soon thereafter vehemently reject the Oscar as the ultimate barometer of a film’s artistic worth. Those of us who started off with The Godfather, Schindler’s List, All About Eve, or Casablanca all eventually got around to Out of Africa, Around the World in 80 Days, The Greatest Show on Earth, Cimarron, and Cavalcade. First loves being first loves, we still find ourselves regressing if for only one night a year, succumbing to the allure of instant canonization even as it comes in the form of repeated slap-in-the-face reminders of Oscar’s bracing wrongness: Gladiator, Braveheart, Chicago, Crash. In that sense, consider this project part cathartic exorcism and part sheepish capitulation to the role the Oscars have played in our lives. If we had to sit through every one of these movies, the least you can allow us is the chance to show you our scars. "

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
Haha

I didn't watch much TV in HS, so I missed this.


"George Clooney is an undercover cop/Soundgarden roadie in the April 1990 ABC Saturday night drama, SUNSET BEAT. From the creators of '21 Jump Street'. Lasted one season."
 #Television #SaturdayMotivation


https://twitter.com/adsausage/status/121...7663581184



[Image: EOk8QUaUwAAuubk.jpg]

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
Ha, Uproxx checked out the pilot so you don't have to - https://uproxx.com/tv/george-clooney-sun...t-episode/
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
Reply
(01-25-2020, 10:48 AM)Mangy Wrote: Ha, Uproxx checked out the pilot so you don't have to - https://uproxx.com/tv/george-clooney-sun...t-episode/

Jesus. You know when 80s/90s action movie heads sit around and mad-lib their way to the cheesiest "Awesome" tv/movie pitch while drunk/high? That's that show!
They'd probably even put George Clooney in it.
Reply
Rough, rough day. This was a nice read to get lost in.

British Bulldog: Bob Hoskins and the Bottle


by

Bill Ryan


January 25, 2020


https://www.rebellermedia.com/original/b...the-bottle

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
New Bev is doing a triple bill next weekend of ORCA, NIGHTWING, and PROPHECY (damn right I'll be following along at home!) - here's QT writing about it on the Bev blog:



http://thenewbev.com/tarantinos-reviews/nightwing/

"The New Beverly has a real fun horror film triple feature at the end of the January calendar. An ecology horror / Native American mystic / Animals Attack triple feature from the late seventies and all three directed by studio stalwarts not known for directing horror. Michael (“The Quiller Memorandum”) Anderson’s “Orca”, John (“Birdman Of Alcatraz”) Frankenheimer’s “Prophecy” and Arthur (“Love Story”) Hiller’s “Nightwing”. “Orca” came out in 1977, and both “Nightwing” & “Prophecy” came out in 1979, and I saw all three during their original theatrical release (“Prophecy” I saw on a special Friday night sneak preview at the Mann’s Old Town Mall Cinema. Remember those?). Suffice to say none of the three work all the way through. In all cases the climax reduces the movies to a state of ridiculousness. In the case of “Orca” & “Nightwing” unfortunately so, because until they fly off the rails at the climax, they’re both pretty effective Animal Attack thrillers. However when the self serious “Prophecy” starts going ape shit crazy (or bear shit), is when it starts getting enjoyable. Of the three “Orca’s” the best. Though you could make a case that “Nightwing” is the classiest and you wouldn’t be wrong. And you could make the case that due to it’s bonkers bear monster alone “Prophecy” is easily the most fun, and you wouldn’t be wrong there either. Now while I dig the bear monster in “Prophecy” and Carlo Rambaldi’s Vampire Bats in “Nightwing”, I love the whale in “Orca.” All three films share symbolic connections of theme and genre and archetypes, so while I write about “Nightwing” I’ll refer to “Orca” and “Prophecy” in connection with “Nightwing.”"

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
I always dig reading QT write about his old theater hopping days, especially when he talks about the United Artists theater at the Del Amo Fashion Center (where Max Cherry went out to see "whatever looks good and starts soon") and Mann's Old Towne Mall theater in Torrance (this was my mecca where I spent most of my junior year in high school right after I moved here from Japan in '89 as it was w/in reasonable biking distance, w/ countless hours spent there watching BATMAN, LAST CRUSADE, BLACK RAIN, etc.). The Old Towne Mall theater closed in the early 90s and the UA theater at Del Amo closed not too long after JACKIE BROWN filmed there I think. Good times.
The most important thing in life is broads. Broads!
Reply
Here's another recent Tarantino review. This one is on one of my favorite films BIG WEDNESDAY!

http://thenewbev.com/tarantinos-reviews/big-wednesday/

"While all in all I prefer Milius’ directorial debut “Dillinger,” it’s hard to argue against the idea that his surfer epic “Big Wednesday” isn’t his classic. The film revolves around three surfer buddies in the sixties, Matt (Jan-Michael Vincent), Barlow (William Katt), and Leroy the Masochist (Gary Busey) – all perfectly cast – who in their day riding the waves on the beaches of Southern California, were gods. But then, as is the case with most Milius characters, their day passes and they’re forced back down to earth to live among the mortals. Milius takes his story from his own surfer youth during the same time period. Yet Milius doesn’t strive for realism in his depiction of the trio. Instead he presents it just short of Arthurian Legend. It treats these guys (who Milius later quipped, “All became drug dealers”) as both mystic knights and over-the-hill Wild Bunch Basterds. Men who got what it takes at the moment of reckoning to distinguish themselves. Be it a hundred-man army of Mexican soldiers or the skyscraper-like swells of Big Wednesday."



"More than any other movie Milius directed, “Big Wednesday” contains the joy of filmmaking (he waited his whole career to make this movie). It also illustrates the problems with many of his other movies. Which by contrast seem to contain the frustration of filmmaking. In its day “Big Wednesday” never found its audience during its original release (it was one of three beach movies that came out the same year, “California Dreaming” with Dennis Christopher & Crown International’s “Malibu Beach”). After the film opened soft, Milius even considered going back in to re-edit it (as if that would help). However, in the eighties via surfer screenings and midnight shows from California’s Hermosa Beach to Australia’s Palm Beach, “Big Wednesday” became one of the most beloved films by the subculture it sought to depict. Back when I worked at the beach community video store Video Archives, “Big Wednesday” was the most requested film not yet released on home video (Led Zeppelin’s “The Song Remains the Same” was the second)."

One more for the road:

QT on THE SHOOTIST:

http://thenewbev.com/tarantinos-reviews/the-shootist/

"When it comes to who was chosen to helm John Wayne’s final western/film, Don Siegel is a bit of an odd choice. While Siegel was one of the best genre filmmakers who ever lived, and during his career he made his share of westerns, he didn’t make nearly as many his closest contemporaries Aldrich, Karlson, Fuller, Witney, Jack Arnold, and Gordon Douglas, nor did he make them as good. In fact if it wasn’t for the inclusion of his Elvis Presley western “Flaming Star” (a truly great fifties western, and maybe the most brutally violent American western of its era), his western filmography wouldn’t be impressive at all. His first western, the Audie Murphy quickie, “The Duel at Silver Creek”, is a very well conceived and executed picture, as well as being obviously a Siegel picture. One of Siegel’s most interesting story telling tactics is audience misdirection. It’s in his first film “The Verdict”, “Flaming Star”, “Charley Varrick”, even in his Burt Reynolds caper comedy “Rough Cut”. And it’s used to dramatic effect in “The Duel of Silver Creek”. Within the films first twelve minutes Faith Domergue is introduced as the least interesting character in a fifties western, the pretty lady love interest of the sheriff (complete with silk dress, fancy hat, and parasol). Only to shockingly revel that Miss Domergue is in cahoots with films villainous claim jumpers by strangling a wounded man to death. This sudden dramatic revelation snaps your attention into focus for the rest of the picture. It also colors your perception of, not only Miss Domergue, but practically every character she comes in contact with, especially the stuck on her sheriff (Stephen McNally), who from that moment on looks like a complete fool. And while the film has it’s silly moments – usually involving a ridiculous character named Johnny Sombrero (Eugene Iglesias) – aside from señor Sombrero, the films villains aren’t a joke. One of my favorite heavies of the era, the Bogart like Gerald Mohr (check him out as the villain in the William Witney and John English serial “Jungle Girl”. His Cheshire Cat smile hides a shark bite), leads an evil bunch of claim jumpers, dirty dogs who force gold prospectors to sign over their claims at the barrel of a gun, then savagely murders them. There’s even a faint hint of the Ku Klux Klan about the jumpers, since some of them are respected members of the community, they operate a bit like a secret society. It’s definitely a fun Audie Murphy western of that Universal period, but it’s not the class act. Those bragging rights belong to Jack Arnold and his Murphy mystery western “No Name on the Bullet” (Siegel did two films with Audie Murphy and considered casting him as Scorpio in “Dirty Harry”)."


"Which brings us to “The Shootist”. There’s nothing in “The Shootist” you haven’t seen done many times before and done better. Including a few years earlier by Richard Fleischer in “The Spikes Gang” ( which also shares young actor Ron Howard), and a few years later by Lamont Johnson in “Cattle Annie & Little Britches”. But what you haven’t seen before is a dying John Wayne give his last performance. And its Wayne’s performance, and the performances of some of the surrounding characters (Howard, Richard Boone, Harry Morgan, and Sheree North) that make “The Shootist”, not the classic it wants to be, but memorable nonetheless. The film really only has one purpose, to be a cinematic eulogy to Wayne’s career (“On Golden Pond” served the same function for Henry Fonda). Not only is that a dubious reason to make a film, the maudliness inherently involved in such an endeavor, seems a dishonorable pursuit for any serious artist (though there are some successful examples, Peter Bogdanovich’s swan song to Boris Karloff “Targets” being one of them). But as suspicious as I am when a director tries to tug on my heartstrings, even I think John Wayne ending his career with “Rooster Cogburn & The Lady” would be a damn shame. The fact that “The Shootist” is a good film at all, is all due to Wayne, which in it’s own way, is perfectly fitting for the big man. Like many a star at the twilight of their career, who have actually managed to remain stars, the last ten years of their career usually falls into a pattern: Geriatric versions of the movies that they use to make, usually featuring a few young performers, and many familiar faces from the old days. Usually directed by one or two directors that the aging star is comfortable with. This describes the last ten years of Bob Hope’s movie career, Jerry Lewis’ twilight starring career, Glenn Ford’s last decade staring in westerns, and Charles Bronson’s last ten years at Cannon Pictures. And this describes Wayne’s last decade to a tee. Aside from crazy experiments like “McQ” (no good, but I kinda like it anyway, if for nothing else that amazing gun that McQ shoots), and “Brannigan” (silly, but that’s what’s enjoyable about it), during the last decade of John Wayne’s career he made John Wayne movies."

The Last One, I Swear:

QT on A MAN CALLED TIGER

http://thenewbev.com/tarantinos-reviews/...led-tiger/


"At one time before Bruce Lee decided to go his own way with the self-directed “The Way of the Dragon” (U.S. Title : “Return of the Dragon”), “A Man Called Tiger” was to be the third Bruce Lee / Lo Wei vehicle after “The Big Boss” & “Fist of Fury”. However, except for the opportunity it would have allowed Bruce to wear the snazzy garish seventies fashions he seemed to prefer in real life, this doesn’t seem like a natural fit for The Little Dragon. But as the Wang Yu vehicle it became, it’s one of the stars most beloved films (At least in the west due to its theatrical release by World Northal and the early Embassy Home Video release), and one of his most violent movies (and for Wang Yu, that’s saying something)."

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
I really went down the QT rabbit hole:

Here he is on THE YAKUZA:

http://thenewbev.com/tarantinos-reviews/the-yakuza/

"Schrader told Brett Easton Ellis, “We [Paul and his brother Leonard] had written a Yakuza gangster movie in the Toei Studio gangster tradition.” At the end of that script, the Schraders give us the first of Paul’s blood-all-over-the-walls climaxes to reach the screen. Takakura Ken takes on his Japanese opponents, shirtless, green dragon tattoo covering his muscled back, with a samurai sword, while Big Bob Mitchum blasts through rice paper walls with a double barrel shotgun. Talk about East meets West!Even Scorsese admitted that Travis’ final bloodbath at the end of Taxi Driver was motivated by a sense of bushido honor; “Paul saw it was a kind of samurai death with honor – that’s why DeNiro attempts suicide.” Schrader even felt Scorsese’s final bloodbath wasn’t bloody enough. Scorsese said: “He felt that if he directed the scene, there would have been tons of blood all over the walls, a more surrealistic effect,” like Japanese movies. The Japanese way is to exaggerate and emphasize thus making surreal.”"

"The general word on The Yakuza, from both Schrader and the big deal critics of its day, was that director Sydney Pollack was not the man for the job. Pauline Kael spent about thirty percent of her review listing all the filmmakers who would have been better suited for this property. Pollack wasn’t perfect casting for the project. Nevertheless The Yakuza remains a unique, nifty 70’s gangster thriller with two great action stars being outstanding.Mitchum through the rest of the 70’s and 80’s would periodically do effective work (I especially like his turn as John Savage’s father in Andrei Konchalovsky’s Maria’s Lovers). But more often than not, in whatever role he was playing – movie studio executive in The Last Tycoon, tv executive in Scrooged, advertising executive in Agency – he played an oak tree. In Farewell, My Lovely he played an oak tree in a snap brim fedora. It’s exemplified by watching all twelve hours of his starring performance in the eighties mini-series Winds of War (you always felt sorry for Victoria Tennant whenever they made her kiss him). But in The Yakuza, for the last time as a lead, Mitchum was vibrantly alive. Apparently, Pollack stressed the The Way We Were aspect of the love story inside the Yakuza story (Mitchum and dignified Kishi Keiko play reunited lovers from World War II.) But that aspect of the story is one of the film’s most effective features. And that’s mostly due to the romantic, moony, wounded bear quality that Mitchum brings to the role.Takukara Ken became a superstar in Japan after starring in the stark, stylistic black and white snow-set prison escape adventure Abashiri Bangaichi. Directed by tough guy mystro Teruo Ishii, who Ken shared an artistic relationship with similar to Don Siegel and Clint Eastwood’s. Abashiri Bangaichi would eventually produce a fourteen film Japanese action film series (I’ve only seen the first one, without sub-titles, and it’s terrific). While Ken is one of the most iconic stars in the history of Japanese cinema, and even though he’s done a few other international productions (Too Late the Hero, Black Rain, Mr. Baseball), most western audiences only know him from this movie. But in The Yakuza he delivers such a perfect presentation of his persona that it’s all you really need to know. And this comes after a period of a few international productions (Hell in the Pacific & Red Sun) that featured Toshiro Mifune, and Mifune seemed less than. So Takakura Ken’s powerhouse performance, at the height of his fame, in this Hollywood Yakuza flick, seems even more of a triumph."

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
I'm like half Brian Wilson - the quirky weird half, alas with not a hint of the genius part:


https://twitter.com/JFrankensteiner/stat...1473993728







[Image: EPGX8G9X0AAIoSM.jpg:large]

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
"Movies this loopy usually have their fits and starts – there are long periods of boredom in the touchstones of the genre – a Hall of Shame that includes Showgirls (Viva Las Vegas meets The 120 Days of Sodom), Yes, Giorgio (Luciano Pavarotti as Sex Object) and Robot Monster (its claim to fame a diving helmet, gorilla suit and bubble machine). The Oscar is never boring – two hours breeze by like a Preston Sturges satire and it feels way shorter than Last Year at Marienbad. Crowther was appalled by the film’s rancid atmosphere but he was ignoring the therapeutic qualities of misanthropy – the lacerating banter of Sweet Smell of Success is as bracing as a cold shower while the misadventures of Frankie Fane deliver a comical catharsis like no other. How can something so wrong feel so right? That is the mystery of The Oscar."

CineSavant

The Oscar

by Charlie Largent Jan 25, 2020

https://trailersfromhell.com/the-oscar/

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
"Mel Brooks tells a story about Orson Welles doing all the narration for History of the World: Part I in 10 minutes after Mel expected it to take 5 days. Orson then spends his salary exclusively on Cuban cigars and caviar."

https://twitter.com/JFrankensteiner/stat...4970607616

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
(01-28-2020, 07:03 AM)Fat Elvis Wrote: "Mel Brooks tells a story about Orson Welles doing all the narration for History of the World: Part I in 10 minutes after Mel expected it to take 5 days. Orson then spends his salary exclusively on Cuban cigars and caviar."

https://twitter.com/JFrankensteiner/stat...4970607616

sounds about right.
"Why did she do it?"
"Why are you the fucking Police?"

Reply
Yep. Having recently read Lunches with Orson, that sounds very much on-brand for late 70s/early 80s Welles.

Also, that triple bill of ORCA, NIGHTWING, and PROPHECY is fucking amazing and I wish I could go.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
Reply
I haven't seen Nightwing since I was at least 10 or 11.
If I could change to liquid, I'd fill the cracks and bend the rocks.
Reply
Here's a pretty great essay by Glenn Kenny on alcoholism and SHUTTER ISLAND - https://somecamerunning.typepad.com/some...sland.html
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
Reply
"No, this isn’t a documentary about the sorry situation faced by too many American homeowners. Howard Hughes takes RKO into SuperScope and color for this attractive, somewhat tame sunken treasure adventure starring his captive glamour star Jane Russell. No off-color advertising slogans this time around, but the show shapes up as a swimsuit catalog for Jane as well as her handsome co-stars Richard Egan and Gilbert Roland. Plus, the Latin rhythms of the incomparable Pérez Prado!"

CineSavant

Underwater!

by Glenn Erickson Jan 28, 2020

https://trailersfromhell.com/underwater/


"By mid-1954 Fox’s new CinemaScope format was in use by other studios as well. It had already conquered 3-D, and some predicted that ALL feature filmmaking would be anamorphic (which actually happened in Japan, four years later). Howard Hughes defied the trend by rolling the dice with the Tushinskys’ clever SuperScope format. * Rather than lining up to rent an expensive Bausch & Lomb CinemaScope lens, RKO simply took a horizontal ‘stripe’ out of the middle of a normal 35mm frame. An optical printer blew it up and squeezed it so that it would yield an extra-wide image projected with a ‘scope lens. The added granularity was partly counteracted by Technicolor printing. It was a poor man’s workaround in the ‘fifties format wars — a distributor could charge more for a ‘scope film, and exhibitors liked the idea of booking less expensive films while still being able to use those big screens and lenses they had to shell out for. In a couple of years, SuperScope introduced SuperScope 235 which used the entire 35mm picture width, including the soundtrack area. It’s essentially the same as today’s ‘Super 35′ format, the one favored by James Cameron in the 1980s and 1990s."

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
Good stuff:

Here's Hackman reflecting on his career in a 1988 interview:

https://www.filmcomment.com/article/inte...e-hackman/


"If recent films are an indication, Gene Hackman is entering a whole new phase of his already remarkable career—as a late-blooming romantic leading man.

The most riveting scenes in three of his upcoming films are with women—even in such an unlikely vehicle as Mississippi Burning, the searing drama directed by Alan Parker in which he and Willem Dafoe play FBI agents investigating the murder of three civil rights workers in 1964. Hackman’s gallant approach to Frances McDormand, who, as wife to the deputy sheriff, knows, literally, where the bodies are buried, is something to behold—tender, warm, and subtly sexual.

In Full Moon in Blue Water he plays a moping widower who is simply lost without a woman by his side, and in Woody Allen’s Another Woman, opposte Gene Rowalnds, his juicy, masculine charm is palpable. The surest sign we’re given of Rowlands’ character’s misguided life is her rejection of Hackman.

No other American actor is doing this kind of work. Indeed, civilized relations between the sexes have been largely absent from our films for 15 years—lost to the youth craze, buddy movies, and confusions brought on by women’s emergence from the kitchen and into society at large.

All the more remarkable, then, to find need, caring, and delicate sensuality embodied in an actor who in 1971 became a veritable icon of blue-collar machismo with his Oscar-winning portrayal of the obsesses narcotics cop, Popeye Doyle, in The French Connection. Not that Hackman has been totally confined to working-class trenches. He was a surveillance expert in The Conversation, a skydiver in Gypsy Moths, and a labor organizer in Reds. He did brilliant comic turns in Young Frankenstein and the Superman movies, and in the Eighties has risen to white-collar ranks, playing an arrogant defense secretary in No Way Out, a ruthlessly effective campaign manager in the underrated—and prescient—Power, and a confident, privilged foreign correspondent in Under Fire. In Nicolas Roeg’s Eureka, he combined marginal man with tycoon, as a gold prospector who strikes it rich and becomes a megalomaniacal island potentate.

But all of these films required Hackman to play the quintessential man’s man for whom women were mostly a diversion—often a troublesome one—if they were even around at all.

Director Arthur Penn thinks the roots of this metamorphosis may be seen in Night Moves, the 1975 thriller they made together where Hackman has tough, sexy scenes with Jennifer Warren. Perhaps. Certainly by the time of Under Fire (1983) in which he endures humiliation rather than relinquish a woman he loves to another man; Twice in a Lifetime (1985) where his steelworker agonizingly terminates a 30-year marriage for a woman of his wife’s generation (Ellen Burstyn and Ann-Margret co-starred); Hoosiers (1986) and his ardent wooing of Barbara Hershey; and even in No Way Out where carnality and male pride lead to murder, it was obvious that something fresh and potent was emerging."

"The hit comedy Any Wednesday, in which he co-starred opposite Sandy Dennis in 1964, established his Broadway reputation. Shortly thereafter, he won his first substantial film role, in Lilith, which starred Warren Beatty, who was responsible for Hackman’s being cast as his brother in Bonnie and Clyde. It was the first of three films he made for Penn (Night Moves, and Target in 1985), and earned him his first Oscar nomination in the supporting category. The second came two years later for I Never Sang For My Father, and two years later came The French Connection.

Altogether, Hackman has made an even 50 films, and though many have been routine, his contribution has always been of the highest order. “He is incapable of bad work,” says his Mississippi Burning director, Alan Parker. “Every direct has a short list of actors he’d die to work with, and I’ll bet Gene’s on every one.”

“He is an extraordinarily truthful actor,” comments Arthur Penn, “and he has the skill to tap into hidden emotions that many of us cover over or hide—and it’s not just skill but courage.”

The range of raw emotion, feeling, states of being and conflict Hackman can convey is remarkable. His face is a great instrument. His body still as a statue, we watch his face, the interplay between his mouth and eyes. He allows us inside; we are really with him, we see the decision process and thus are prepared for the final thrust of his action.

This great gift is of particular importance when he acts with women, because often the action there is internal rather than external, which is why he has been tapped for some of these recent roles.

“American movies have always had certain kinds of self-styled actors who shouldn’t be stars but are,” notes Penn, “and Gene is in the company of Bogart, Tracy, and Cagney.” The director agrees that Hackman is more than ready to bust loose of his average-Joe trappings and do something on a grand scale—a modern-day Coriolanus or Lear.

Two projects are already set for next year. In The Package, directed by Andy Davis for Orion Pictures, he plays a career master sergeant inadvertently implicated in a conspiracy. Then Hackman makes his directorial debut with Thomas Harris’ best-selling novel, The Silence of the Lambs, also for Orion.

There is an ageless quality to Hackman; he has changed little in 14 years and is more at ease with himself than ever. He attributes the new dimensions of his artistry to conscious acting choices rather than to an altered states as a person. “In a way, something is just beginning for him,” says Penn."

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
Odd to think there's an alternate universe where Silence Of The Lambs was directed by Gene Hackman.
Reply
(01-31-2020, 06:47 AM)Paul C Wrote: Odd to think there's an alternate universe where Silence Of The Lambs was directed by Gene Hackman.
He apparently balked because the script was too violent, which...did he read the book?
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
Reply
I really want this Walter Hill book:

Walter Chaw: "Walter Hill's RED HEAT is an extraordinary piece on male friendship, performative toxicity and sublimated homosexuality. I wrote a whole chapter about it in my upcoming Hill book. It's the culmination of much of his early career work on male relationships in crisis and tension."

"Arguably, it's Arnie's best performance during his blockbuster period. It predicts in many ways his turn in T2 - the android thawing into a human. And it's a lot easier to take in a film that doesn't have a weird, clumsy peacenik agenda attached to it."

"That's part and parcel with the toxicity. I think the Belushi character is gay, though. There are hints throughout but especially in the diner conversation when they're talking about relationships. Danko is essentially avenging his beautiful dead partner."

https://twitter.com/mangiotto/status/122...7883522048

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
Speaking of Walter Chaw, he dropped his top 50 of '19 last month. Just caught up with it. An eclectic, fascinating mix. Only place I've seen love for the latest RAMBO and HELLBOY movies!

"The 50 Best Films of 2019" by Walter Chaw

https://www.filmfreakcentral.net/ffc/202...-chaw.html

"Rambo: Last Blood is the story of a golem conjured by the United States that is in its dotage now, essentially married to an old Mexican woman (just like the T-800 in Terminator: Dark Fate) in the clearest, purest expression that this is America's future if it wants one, but some motherfuckers just can't let things get to where they're going without blood. Rambo's surrogate daughter defies his wishes and seeks her birth father across the border. Things go very badly for her. And then things go very badly for the men responsible. It's the year's second trickiest film to champion because it seems to confirm every fear of every Fox News, MAGAt cultist wanting to outlaw races and religions not their own. (The first is Dragged Across Concrete.) What I think of is how sad Rambo is at the beginning and at the end. He's become the American Cassandra. No one listens to him, so he is the sole repository of wisdom and grief. He tells the last victim of his climactic killing spree that he could've done all this from a sanitized distance, but wanted to feel their dawning knowledge bleeding from the tips of his fingers. It's shockingly violent, as only the best catharses can be."

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
Twitter Truth:

https://twitter.com/flipyourface/status/...1335905280

"The 35 minutes of Joker that I could choke down struck me as a great actor careening toward self-parody, something many great actors are prone to, which is fine, but still. I couldn't stand to watch another minute of it."

"Phoenix on Joker reminds me of the worst of Brando, schtickwise, except he's committed to the bad material in a way Brando never let himself be, which is disquieting"

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
"Just before Bruce planted his feet into the white guy’s soon-to-be-demolished rib cage, a cry came from a black wino sitting behind me. 'Don’t hurt him so bad, Bruce. Kill the motherfucker. But don’t hurt him so bad,' ”

Mark Jacobson on Bruce Lee, 1978

Paranoid Notes on the Strange Death of Bruce Lee
December 4, 1978

https://www.villagevoice.com/1978/12/04/...bruce-lee/


"I first became aware of the awesome cross-cultural power of Bruce E. Lee while watching Enter the Dragon at the Lyric Theatre on Forty-­second Street. The vengeful Bruce was on the verge of killing a bad white boy who earlier in the film had tried to rape a Lee sister, causing the woman to commit suicide. Now, however, the hoodlum was staggering on one edge of the Cinemascope screen, while on the other Bruce was winding himself into a corkscrew of death. Then Lee flung himself, feet first, toward the bad guy. Bruce slow-motioned through the air for what seemed an eternity. Just before Bruce planted his dynamite feet into the white guy’s soon-to-be-demolished rib cage, a cry came from a black wino sitting behind me. “Don’t hurt him so bad, Bruce. Kill the motherfucker. But don’t hurt him so bad.” All movie long the wino had been rooting for all the whiteys to get dead, so his show of mercy for the chief bad white guy puzzled me. The only conclusion was that somewhere down deep the wino had connected with the notion that Bruce Lee possessed within his seemingly slight body a cosmic force far more terrible than a battery of M-16s. Even a Forty-second Street wino doesn’t want to be eyeball to eyeball with that kind of power.

This incident occurred soon before the fall of Nam. I coupled the calendar reference with the fact that audiences for Bruce Lee movies have always been almost exclusively black and Puerto Rican — even when the films were only playing down in Chinatown — and came up with the Third World Alliance Theory. The theory postulates that blacks and Puerto Ricans in New York were giant Bruce Lee fans because the United States lost the Vietnam War. Sense could be made of it: For years blacks and Puerto Ricans hadn’t been getting squat in the city due to a heavy white boot heel. Now they were checking the Daily News and seeing little guys, a bunch of egg-roll makers, kicking whitey’s butt in Nam. Kicking whitey’s technological butt. But how were they managing it? What secret weapon did they have? The answer was clear to anyone watching The Chinese Connection or Fists of Fury."

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
Yes! I want a Scream Factory Blu stat.

In Defense Of 'Nothing But Trouble,' A Macabre Screwball Gem From The '90s

https://www.ranker.com/list/nothing-but-...HIjslh7OZI

"Released in 1991, Nothing but Trouble was DOA. It was meant to be a horror-comedy, but most reviews at the time claimed it lacked the necessary scares or laughs the mixed genre required. However, the film garnered a second life on HBO and in video rental stores across the country, and freaked out pretty much anyone who managed to catch this legitimately weird movie. So maybe it did its job, in the end.

Is Nothing but Trouble the worst movie ever? It’s definitely not the best, but its badness comes more from a lack of a cohesive tone and poor pacing than from it just being a bad movie. And even though it’s not the best-structured movie, it’s very entertaining. What other movie features Dan Aykroyd with a hideously suggestive nose, John Candy in drag, Tupac Shakur, and Demi Moore playing cards with two infantile troglodytes while she’s locked in a cage? Maybe Nothing but Trouble is the most entertaining movie ever made. "

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
In a Directors Draft we did a few years back I dropped Aykroyd for directing NBT and everyone was appalled.
If I could change to liquid, I'd fill the cracks and bend the rocks.
Reply
Someone asked Aykroyd in an interview about doing an oral history for the movie, and he said curtly 'that'll never happen'. Too bad.

I remember catching it at the dollar theatre back in the day. For years I considered it one of the worst movies I'd ever seen. Something happened about 9 or 10 years ago giving it another chance - I fell in love with its weirdness.

It was probably one of my most watched movies last decade.

There's something endearing and fascinating about train wrecks that have an artist's passion and/or an abundance of that artist's personal quirks.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
"Pedro Almodóvar’s challenging films shouldn’t be only for his dedicated fans: nobody mixes genuine human compassion with world-class filmmaking as well as he … while maintaining a marvelous sense of humor, of human proportion. This 1999 effort is perhaps Pedro’s strongest drama, and yet another heartfelt endorsement of womankind. For the life-beleaguered Manuela, tragedy and melodramatic setbacks only bring out a primal determination to heal all wounds."


CineSavant

All About My Mother

by Glenn Erickson Feb 01, 2020

https://trailersfromhell.com/all-about-my-mother/

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
The Duke: props due


"Ahead of the 2019 Oscars, airing this Sunday, let us take a moment to remember that this is the 50th anniversary of John Wayne’s winning — and consider, for a moment, that Duke may just be the greatest practitioner of movie acting in the sound era. "

John Wayne: The Ultimate Movie Actor


by

Greg Ferrara


February 3, 2020


https://www.rebellermedia.com/original/j...ovie-actor


"Wayne came to us from a different time — and a different technological era. In 1927, Warner Brothers released The Jazz Singer, a movie so feverishly mediocre in every possible way that, had it not been for one conspicuous technological feat, it would have forever disappeared from the cinematic landscape the moment its first run ended. That technological feat, of course, was sound. Not the whole movie, but a few select scenes where star Al Jolson sang some songs and, by God, you could hear him. As the sound era rushed in while the silents were jettisoned out the back door, studios began looking for stage-trained actors who could recite great dialogue before the camera. And it got them. Helen Hayes, John Barrymore, George Arliss, and Katharine Hepburn were all called up for active service and all came, gung ho and battle ready, except for one thing: None of them knew how to act in movies.

Oh, sure, you’d be excused for believing they did, especially Hayes and Hepburn, who both had careers so long and fruitful that most of us are thinking of them late in the game, when they had fully earned their chops and knew the tricks of the trade. Certainly, they all became great film actors. But early on, they were great stage actors who gave good to great stage performances that happened to be filmed. Many new actors to sound, Arliss and Barrymore especially, chose stage-to-screen roles over written-for-the-screen roles, as plays were seen as more prestigious. This significantly hampered their long-range accessibility as many of those early stage-to-screen movies in the sound era’s infancy were dour proceedings indeed. A few rose above it — Dinner at Eight comes to mind — but most were statically filmed records of, essentially, stage performances. The movies required something else entirely.

And that something was John Wayne. "

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
"Fifty years ago, her searing supporting role in 'Last  Summer' led to critical acclaim and Academy recognition, but the actress soon disappeared from Hollywood, leaving her fans and showbiz admirers searching for answers. The Hollywood Reporter attempts to solve one of Oscar’s great mysteries."



Catherine Burns: The Vanishing of an Oscar-Nominated Actress


by Scott Feinberg, Scott Johnson

February 03, 2020, 6:00am PST


https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/featur...ee-1275646



"For years, screenwriter Larry Karaszewski has been obsessed with the 1969 indie film Last Summer, a dark teen drama about youthful passions, angst and cruelty. Karaszewski, a Golden Globe winner whose credits include The People vs. Larry Flynt, Ed Wood and Dolemite Is My Name, has long wanted to share the film with others. There was just one problem: Last Summer had all but disappeared in physical form. The limited number of original prints were lost or damaged, and the only scrap he managed to find was a beat-up 16mm print from Australia, which he describes as "a mashup of the censored TV version and the theatrical cut."

Last Summer isn't for the faint of heart. Its story of friendship gone horribly wrong culminates in a graphic rape scene, which landed it an X rating. But what stayed most with Karaszewski about the Allied Artists release was the work of one of its four young stars, Hollywood newcomer Catherine Burns. Her turn is highlighted by "one of the greatest soliloquies in the history of film," he says, referring to a three-minute sequence in which Burns' Rhoda shares the story of what became of her mother. "She's understated and real. Not a dishonest note in her performance."

Karaszewski wasn't alone in his appreciation of Last Summer— or of Burns. "Twice or three times a year, a scene in a film will absorb you so completely … And then you know you're in the presence of greatness," wrote Roger Ebert, then a young Chicago Sun-Times critic. "That feeling came to me twice during Frank Perry's Last Summer, and both times the actress onscreen was Cathy Burns."

Burns was so mesmerizing, in fact, that her performance as the youngest and most naive of the teens garnered her a best supporting actress Oscar nomination and set her, briefly, on the path to stardom.

Burns was actually the oldest of the film's four stars, and her acclaim was all the more unexpected because she possessed, in her own words and others' lacerating estimation, "a funny face." Five-foot-1 and freckled, she was not Hollywood's idea of a starlet. Dick Kleiner, a syndicated columnist, wrote, "Twenty years ago, they wouldn't have let her inside a studio gate." Kleiner noted that she had a face "like an intelligent marshmallow," while The New York Times' Vincent Canby said her body was "shaped like a fat mushroom." But even those who used such cruel and sexist language couldn't help but admire her acting. Ebert's future partner Gene Siskel of the Chicago Tribune urged people to remember "the homeliest" of Last Summer's stars come Oscar time, and the photo accompanying his article read, "Cathy Burns: Not prettiest … but the most talented."

When Karaszewski obtained the Australian print of Last Summer in 2012 and was making plans to show it in Hollywood, he tried to contact the film's stars to participate in a public Q&A. Barbara Hershey, who had gone on to an Oscar nomination for 1996's The Portrait of a Lady and played Natalie Portman's mom in 2010's Black Swan, attended. Five years later, when Quentin Tarantino's New Beverly Cinema was hosting a Frank Perry retrospective using the same print, Karaszewski got for a Q&A Bruce Davison, who had gone on to be nominated for an Oscar for 1989's Longtime Companion and star in the recent X-Men films. On neither occasion did he receive a response from Richard Thomas, who had won an Emmy for The Waltons and become a distinguished stage actor. As for Burns, he laments, "I could not find a trail. Even in this age of Facebook and Google, she was impossible to track down." He adds, "I became so obsessed that a friend gave me a framed picture of Cathy, which hangs in my office," a quiet reminder of an enduring Hollywood mystery."

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
Just read the entire story. Jesus, that's tragic and heartbreaking and infuriating. Clearly the culture's casual misogyny and body shaming had a hugely destructive impact on her.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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(02-04-2020, 08:58 AM)Fat Elvis Wrote: The Duke: props due


"Ahead of the 2019 Oscars, airing this Sunday, let us take a moment to remember that this is the 50th anniversary of John Wayne’s winning — and consider, for a moment, that Duke may just be the greatest practitioner of movie acting in the sound era. "

John Wayne: The Ultimate Movie Actor

https://www.rebellermedia.com/original/j...ovie-actor

No disrespect to Wayne, who was indeed the most bona fide of movie stars, but I've always considered Fredric March to be the first actor who figured out talkies.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
Reply
Did you know Janet Maslin started out in 'National Lampoon'?

https://twitter.com/nicky_ohio/status/12...7226303488



[Image: EQBlfmAWsAA7kIl.jpg:large]

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
Arnold's tribute to Kirk:

https://twitter.com/Schwarzenegger/statu...8754324480



[Image: EQDTFuVUUAYOMlO.jpg:large]

Tonite: My tribute is double billing OUT OF THE PAST + LAST TRAIN FROM GUN CITY

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply


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