Thread Rating:
  • 2 Vote(s) - 1 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
The Re-up Thread
I was just browsing the IMDB Trivia section for BODY HEAT, and I either never knew this/ or forgot:

"Lawrence Kasdan was unaware for many years that George Lucas, for whom he had worked as a writer on Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back (1980) and Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), acted as a guarantor to Ladd Company studio head Alan Ladd Jr., offering his fee as a guarantee if Kasdan happened to go over budget, thereby covering any overages. "

This is also kind of funny:

"The picture was shot in freezing cold temperatures. The production had to simulate the heatwave of the film's story, the actors having to act hot in cold conditions. For example, the thesps had to suck ice cubes before speaking to eliminate foggy breath and had water sprayed on their skin and shirts to simulate body sweat. "

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
That's wild! Never would have thought that!
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
Reply
Whoa, I would have NEVER guessed that movie was shot in the cold. Amazing.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
Reply
One of the sweatiest films ever made.
Reply
While I'm in this thread, I re-watched THE TERMINATOR: GENYSIS along with DARK FATE recently.

I love that there are basically 3 different TERMINATOR 3's with wildly divergent timelines.

I think Mostow's is the best film, while the new one is the most fun, but I also adored Emilia Clarke's spunky badass interpretation of Sarah Connor. You cast a better Kyle, and more people would forgive the mash up feeling.

I see the series as like PLANET OF THE APES, where even the lesser films are interesting in their own way.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
Clue: Even when I knew exactly what was going to happen, I still laughed. My favorite part would be Curry's Wadsworth explaining how the murders where committed. I do like how the different endings get progressively crazier

PS Communism was just a red herring.
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is I've lost my way. The good news is I'm way ahead of schedule!
Reply
(02-06-2020, 11:58 AM)Judas Booth Wrote: I need to see BODY HEAT again.  I remember it being pretty great.

The main scene I remember is William Hurt walking up behind a lady (thinking she's Kathleen Turner) and saying something like 'Hey lady, you wanna fuck?'.  She turns around and it's not Turner, it's her friend.  The look on his face is priceless.

That bit is gold. As Michael said, Turner is stupid, stupid hot in this.

Clue is something I gotta throw on as it just hit Amazon. Been long enough to separate the jackass childhood friend who loved it from the art.
"PREDATOR 2 feels like it was penned by convicts as part of a correctional facility's creative writing program, and that's what I love about it." - Moltisanti
Reply
I distinctly remember the trailer for Body Heat, which I saw with Outland, another Ladd Company offering from earlier the same year (1981). Lots of 'hot' stuff was layered in, consisting of wind chime noise (no dialogue), short cascading glimpses of William Hurt's sweaty chest, Kathleen Turner's legs and/or profile, dropped panties, a hand clutching and grabbing a bed sheet and other sexually-suggestive activity; all capped with a shot of a gun in someone's hand and an explosion of some sort. The best part occurred after the primary credits when the following card popped up: "Coming this Summer". Those three words brought the house down on both occasions I saw Outland on the big screen.
Reply
People don't talk about William Hurt's 80's run anymore. Pretty fucking impressive. Really up to mid-90's, interesting roles/ great performances. When you come out the gate with ALTERED STATES and BODY HEAT, that's the stuff of legend.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
I've got to watch Altered States again. Apparently Paddy Chayefsky and Ken Russell really got into it during production (Russell made a pretty good account about it in his biography; all from his point of view, of course).

Russell was basically a hired hand and Chayefsky had it in his contract that not one word of his precious dialogue could be changed - which would have made the movie at least half an hour longer. So Russell had his actors chew through every word of dialogue at breakneck speed, often having them talk sentences over one another. This tactic is truly evident in the final result, and for me I believe it adds to the intensity and passion of the characters. (As there was no way to edit around the way the scenes were shot - Chayefsky eventually yanked his name from the writing credits (hence the screenplay by Sidney Aaron).

E.g.: Before Jessup (Hurt) starts his experiments, a whole bunch of them have been drinking wine in a bar for quite some time; they're clearly drunk and the discussion is going into strange territory. The following exchange (thanks Wikiquote) is all in there. Delivered with the intensity of people on amphetamines, it basically encapsulates the main character in less than two minutes of screen time.

Jessup: "What dignifies the Yogic practices is that the belief system itself is not truly religious. There is no Buddhist God per se. It is the Self, the individual Mind, that contains immortality and ultimate truth."

Emily Jessup: "What the hell is not religious about that? You've simply replaced God with the Original Self."

Eddie Jessup: "Yes, but we've localized it. Now I know where the Self is. It's in our own minds. It's a form of human energy. Our atoms are six billion years old. We've got six billion years of memory in our minds. Memory is energy! It doesn't disappear — it's still in there. There's a physiological pathway to our earlier consciousnesses. There has to be; and I'm telling you it's in the goddamned limbic system."

Mason Parrish: "You're a whacko!"

Eddie Jessup: "What's whacko about it, Mason? I'm a man in search of his true self. How archetypically American can you get? Everybody's looking for their true selves. We're all trying to fulfill ourselves, understand ourselves, get in touch with ourselves, face the reality of ourselves, explore ourselves, expand ourselves. Ever since we dispensed with God, we've got nothing but ourselves to explain this meaningless horror of life....Well, I think that that true self, that original self, that first self is a real, mensurate, quantifiable thing, tangible and incarnate. And I'm going to find the fucker."

If anything, I quickly discovered through this movie that my first girlfriend was a unquestioning creationist. She hated Altered States for many of the reasons I loved it; basically it was suggesting concepts and ideas that clashed completely with everything she was apparently brought up to believe. Bullet. Dodged.
Reply
Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory.

One of my favorites growing up. My sister and I must have wore out our VHS tape.

Revisited it for the first time in decades. Still heart warming. Still charmingly wicked. Still get teary eyed at the end especially Charlie's reaction to being told he's being given the factory and Wilder's warm reading of "That's alright, isn't it?

And God did a lot of the jokes fly over my head as a kid. The image of a Wonka van at the White House (circa '70-'71) makes me want to retroactively see Richard Nixon & the Chocolate Factory.

And Grandpa Joe is still kind of a bastard when you think about it.

The real ending to Big...
Reply
WILLY WONKA is one of those movies that continuously brings me joy. Wilder's performance has spawned all those memes for a reason -- he's phenomenal. Just the right amount of eccentricity and warmth, tempered with some genuine edge. Much of his dialogue has been incorporated into my family's everyday parlance (because I watched the film so much growing up).

I even really like the songs ("Cheer Up, Charlie" excluded).
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
Reply
(02-07-2020, 05:13 PM)Fat Elvis Wrote: People don't talk about William Hurt's 80's run anymore. Pretty fucking impressive. Really up to mid-90's, interesting roles/ great performances. When you come out the gate with ALTERED STATES and BODY HEAT, that's the stuff of legend.

He's one of my mom's favorite actors - him and Kevin Kline, just because of The Big Chill. I have to see a good number of his stuff still as well (The Accidental Tourist, Gorky Park).

Quick ascension, an Oscar at 36, always chose smart, adult projects... he's essentially the Adam Driver of the 80's, but without the big-money franchise role.

I like Altered States, but I have a feeling it would be revolutionary if I watched it at a wiser, more mature age.
"PREDATOR 2 feels like it was penned by convicts as part of a correctional facility's creative writing program, and that's what I love about it." - Moltisanti
Reply
I just saw ALTERED STATES for the first time a couple of years ago, and thought it was delightfully bonkers. (agreed on Hurt's 80s run) However, my view of Chayefsky goes down with each passing year. Brilliant, hyper-literate, and the single most didactic human being to ever walk the Earth.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
Reply
(02-08-2020, 04:10 AM)huntertarantino Wrote:
(02-07-2020, 05:13 PM)Fat Elvis Wrote: People don't talk about William Hurt's 80's run anymore. Pretty fucking impressive. Really up to mid-90's, interesting roles/ great performances. When you come out the gate with ALTERED STATES and BODY HEAT, that's the stuff of legend.

He's one of my mom's favorite actors - him and Kevin Kline, just because of The Big Chill. I have to see a good number of his stuff still as well (The Accidental Tourist, Gorky Park).

Quick ascension, an Oscar at 36, always chose smart, adult projects... he's essentially the Adam Driver of the 80's, but without the big-money franchise role.

I like Altered States, but I have a feeling it would be revolutionary if I watched it at a wiser, more mature age.

I remember when THE DOCTOR hit cable. I was in high school. I'd come flying in and out the door, and it seemed like she was always watching it.

My Moms also found I LOVE YOU TO DEATH absolutely hilarious.

Everybody that read the book was disappointed in GORKY PARK back in the day, but I'm a big fan. It works quite well as mood piece.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
Last night's revisit: FLIRTING WITH DISASTER

I miss early David O. Russell. SPANKING THE MONKEY thru I ♥ HUCKABEES.

FLIRTING pretty much invents Ben Stiller's movie star persona.

The cast is brilliant: Stiller, Arquette, Leoni, George Segal, Lily Tomlin, Mary Tyler Moore, Alda, Jenkins, Brolin, and David Patrick Kelly.

The whole third act is modern screwball madness.

Script is layered and super sharp. And Russell directs the heck outta the thing.

For my tastes, it's the best comedy of the 90's.

"San Diego has a big carjacking problem. They bump you, and when you stop, they mutilate you and take your car. "

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
Body Heat is absolutely terrible. Just flat out awful. I recognize I'm in the minority on this, but it's always felt like a kid (in this case Kasdan) wearing his grandpa's suit (in this case film noir) that doesn't quite fit, is too big, and looks ridiculous.

Hurt is a great example, though, of the kind of careers that actors simply don't have anymore due to the disappearance of the mid-range drama/thriller. Said for years that Patrick Wilson could have had Hurt's career if they made the kind of movies they made in the 80s.

We watched BRIDESMAIDS last night. Holds up. I know we're all tired of Oscar talk, but Melissa McCarthy losing to Octavia Spencer for Best Supporting Actress has not aged well.
home taping is killing music
Reply
Boone, why do you hurt me?

In other news, I rewatched my old flipper-disc DVD of Joseph Mankiewicz's SLEUTH again, and remain continuously impressed. Its stage-bound origins are evident, but the quality of the writing and (especially) the performances from Laurence Olivier and Michael Caine make it a totally captivating dark romp. The battle of wits the two characters engage in is nothing less than delightful, and the twists (despite slightly dodgy technical execution) still work because they're a means to an end, not the end itself. And it's shot by the great Oswald Morris, and features production design from the legendary Ken Adam (who delivers a very heightened version of the stereotypical "English manor" setting).

It's a difficult film to track down, but I urge fans of mystery and "puzzle" films to seek it out. It's one of the best films of the 1970s.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
Reply
I was able to see it last year and really liked it, although the "twist" is fairly easy to spot. Belloq, did you ever see the remake with Caine and Jude Law? I haven't and was curious to see what was different in the updated version.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
Reply
I remember BODY HEAT being great but yeah, the twist isn't hard to spot at all, especially if you've ever seen DOUBLE INDEMNITY.
Reply
Sorry for the confusion, I was referring to SLEUTH.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
Reply
(02-11-2020, 12:36 PM)Mangy Wrote: I was able to see it last year and really liked it, although the "twist" is fairly easy to spot. Belloq, did you ever see the remake with Caine and Jude Law? I haven't and was curious to see what was different in the updated version.

I think the twist in SLEUTH works because once it's revealed, there's still the entire third act to go, so it's not like if you guess it, you've "solved" the rest of the movie. There's more going on after that.

And yes, I've seen the remake. Not bad! Some interesting variations on the ideas of the original, though it's decidedly less fun; the original has a bit of a twinkle in the eye, if that makes sense, but the remake plays it somewhat straighter.

Worth a look.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
Reply
When Harry Met Sally... and Mrs. Doubtfire.

Both deserve to earn their keep, and the personality that makes them great are easier to understand as an adult. With the former, it's almost a deconstruction of romantic comedies in how it depicts the mood swings of relationships and fear of commitment. Doubtfire has a meaner streak than I remembered, specifically the fact that the title character/disguise treats everyone outside of his family like shit... but it's funny. Not to mention the fact that its optics about divorce are fairly realistic. Both of these had been between 20 and 25 years since I last saw them, and by god these are timeless.

Doubtfire tearing the hood ornament off Pierce Brosnan's Mercedes, then presenting it to him, is still my favorite part.
"PREDATOR 2 feels like it was penned by convicts as part of a correctional facility's creative writing program, and that's what I love about it." - Moltisanti
Reply
The arguments between Williams and Field in MRS. DOUBTFIRE have some genuine edge. I think that element really helps to ground the silliness. Beyond that, though, Williams is comedically on fire throughout that thing. The montage of the various "looks" they try out on him still slays me every time. And his application phone calls.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
Reply
I rewatched doubtfire a few months ago!

still fun!

even as a kid, I somehow appreciated the fact that it didn't end with Williams and Field getting back together

also, here's a doodle I did a while ago!

   
Reply
Your version of Pierce is great!
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
Reply
he's alleuuuugick to peppah!
Reply
Doubtfire is a weird one. He’s a fucking psychopath. I’m not saying it should be a horror film, per se, but I think if were about 40% creepier, it’s be an insane masterpiece. That made 200 million less domestic!
Brigadier Cousins on PSN
Reply
you mean this???



Reply
(02-12-2020, 02:26 AM)arjen rudd Wrote: Doubtfire is a weird one. He’s a fucking psychopath. I’m not saying it should be a horror film, per se, but I think if were about 40% creepier, it’s be an insane masterpiece. That made 200 million less domestic!

Yeah, I've never been a fan of it. Meaner and sadder than most people remember, and Williams' character is...unhinged.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
Reply
I saw Mrs. Doubtfire in theaters once and detested it. However, it did inspire Mrs. Featherbottom, so at least it brought some good into the world.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
Reply
Last Nite: second viewing of AD ASTRA. I like it a lot. It mostly gets by on Brad Pitt's performance and the look and feel of the film. I wish I'd seen it on the big screen, but I don't get out as much anymore. It's extremely well directed. QT on one of those Ringer podcasts said it's structurally the same as APOCALYPSE NOW; and that's pretty spot on. The one thing that holds it back from being an alltmer, is it slightly deflates once we finally meet TLJ. This despite building slow burn toward it the whole film. It's more a screenplay problem rather than anything TLJ did wrong. I dunno, both times, I felt the climatic scenes should breathe a little more. Maybe it's just James Gray pulling the rug out a little bit.

This will make a great double bill with MISSION TO MARS at the New Bev someday.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
I think Pitt's performance is really good, one of his better ones, but I'm lukewarm on AD ASTRA overall. I know the science/logic issues are secondary to the emotion, but it kept distracting me...I still want to know how a crew of pirates with weapons and vehicles are able to hide on the moon from a government searching for them with drones. Does the moon contain enough hidey-holes to contain a crime syndicate? I say no.

I get that's not the point, but there were things like that which annoyed me throughout the film. I've come to accept that I am not on James Gray's wavelength.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
Reply
Loved AD ASTRA. If the film had been a hit, then I really think that Brad might have gotten a best actor nom off of it.
Reply
I dislike it but I would have been perfectly fine with Pitt getting a Best Actor nomination. What a year he had!
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)