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The Coronavirus Thread, brought to you by Randall Flagg
(03-19-2020, 03:17 PM)kyle reese 2 Wrote: Big print letters for a big big boy. A few more months cognitive decline, and he'll need the audiobook version.

I can imagine that he probably needs glasses to read but because he views glasses as a weakness..."loser nerds...", he won't wear them because his ego won't allow it.
I used to be with "it", but then they changed what "it" was. Now, what I'm with isn't "it", and what's "it" seems weird and scary to me.   -Grandpa Simpson
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An interesting read on how difficult it is to make the masks:

https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsod...ard-to-mak

Quote:"Making masks is not as easy as you imagine. We have to make the ear loops and the metal strip, the packaging. There is a pretty big system involved," Guan Xunze, chairman of pharmaceutical group Shengjingtong in northeastern China, told NPR by phone. He's referring to the metal strip that lets you bend the mask around the nose bridge.

In the U.S., hospital workers either have to fix theirs or make their own:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/...e-supplies

Quote:Hospital workers in Washington state have been making protective medical gear out of office supplies and other run-of-the-mill materials as they deal with a severe shortage of equipment needed to care for patients who may have Covid-19.

Among the supplies coming in handy: clear vinyl sheets.

“We are very close to being out of face shields,” said Becca Bartles, executive director of infection prevention at Providence St. Joseph Health, a 51-hospital system. “Masks, we’re probably a couple of days away” from running out, she said.

To buy time, Providence infection control and quality experts designed prototype face-shields with off-the-shelf materials: marine-grade vinyl, industrial tape, foam and elastic. Monday night they bought supplies at craft stores and Home Depot. On Tuesday, about 20 administrative staff members at the health system’s corporate headquarters volunteered to work an assembly line in a large conference room, putting together 500 home-spun face shields that were going to a hospital in Seattle that night.
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Guess who got called in to cover a shift on the front of the store this Saturday. I get to breathe next to dirty stinky filthy customers. Most people in this town probably think you catch a cold by going outside in cold weather. Cool cool cool. If they don't provide me a mask, I'm walking out.
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A 34-year-old man who died just days ago after testing positive for COVID-19 recently visited Walt Disney World and Universal Studios in Florida:

https://www.foxla.com/news/glendora-man-...ida-report

Quote:A Glendora man who died just days ago after testing positive for COVID-19 recently visited Walt Disney World and Universal Studios in Florida, it was reported Thursday.

Family members of Jeffrey Ghazarian, 34, told TMZ that he died Thursday morning at a Pasadena hospital after being hospitalized for several days.

His sister told TMZ, "He suffered a lot and put up a good fight. We will miss our Jeff every day but we are thankful for all the fun happy memories of the times we had together."
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(03-19-2020, 03:41 PM)Iron Maiden Wrote: A 34-year-old man who died just days ago after testing positive for COVID-19 recently visited Walt Disney World and Universal Studios in Florida:

https://www.foxla.com/news/glendora-man-...ida-report

Quote:A Glendora man who died just days ago after testing positive for COVID-19 recently visited Walt Disney World and Universal Studios in Florida, it was reported Thursday.

Family members of Jeffrey Ghazarian, 34, told TMZ that he died Thursday morning at a Pasadena hospital after being hospitalized for several days.

His sister told TMZ, "He suffered a lot and put up a good fight. We will miss our Jeff every day but we are thankful for all the fun happy memories of the times we had together."

Glad I tested negative already but now I'm worried about my wife...
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(03-19-2020, 03:41 PM)Iron Maiden Wrote: A 34-year-old man who died just days ago after testing positive for COVID-19 recently visited Walt Disney World and Universal Studios in Florida:

https://www.foxla.com/news/glendora-man-...ida-report

Quote:A Glendora man who died just days ago after testing positive for COVID-19 recently visited Walt Disney World and Universal Studios in Florida, it was reported Thursday.

Family members of Jeffrey Ghazarian, 34, told TMZ that he died Thursday morning at a Pasadena hospital after being hospitalized for several days.

His sister told TMZ, "He suffered a lot and put up a good fight. We will miss our Jeff every day but we are thankful for all the fun happy memories of the times we had together."

I feel that this is an important factor to mention-

Quote:Ghazarian passed away Thursday morning. His family said he had a history of asthma and frequent bronchitis as a child. He also had beat testicular cancer back in 2016, which made him a higher risk for contracting coronavirus.
I used to be with "it", but then they changed what "it" was. Now, what I'm with isn't "it", and what's "it" seems weird and scary to me.   -Grandpa Simpson
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Wife is a cancer survivor with asthma. Hopefully this self-quarantine stuff works.
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(03-19-2020, 04:01 PM)schwartz Wrote: Wife is a cancer survivor with asthma.  Hopefully this self-quarantine stuff works.

As do I.  Best wishes, sincerely.
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Aaaaand I just called to tell them I can't work up front. Besides the other risks (deadly virus, uptight suburban moms), I've been making progress on managing my panic attacks, and this is exactly the kind of high tension situation that could cause me to backslide.
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The VA serves as an emergency backup for civilians in times of crisis.

It described that mission on its website since 2014. Until Friday, when it deleted that information.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national-...n-website/

Quote:The Department of Veterans Affairs serves as a backup health system in times of crisis, but its mission statement for this crucial role was deleted from the agency’s website Friday as many in the country grew concerned that the coronavirus could overload civilian hospitals.

VA’s three missions are to serve veterans through care, research and training in its behemoth health system. But in 1982, Congress expanded VA’s role into what has become known as VA’s “fourth mission”: to absorb non-veteran civilian or military patients in the event that hospitals overflow in an emergency, such as a pandemic like the coronavirus.

That objective was described on VA’s Office of Emergency Management page going back to 2014, according to cached pages, and was on VA’s site as late as Friday afternoon. But later that day, references to the “fourth mission” were removed and replaced with information that doesn’t reference the mission at all.

“It’s Orwellian,” Kristofer Goldsmith, the associate director of policy and government affairs at Vietnam Veterans of America, said Monday.

“Major veterans service organizations have pressed so VA is not underfunded. This is a national security issue,” he told The Washington Post. “It’s really frightening to see the administration apparently trying to purge that from America’s memory.”

VA has deployed medical resources to help veterans and civilians alike in the wake of hurricanes, floods and tornadoes. It even sent mental health clinicians to Orlando after the Pulse nightclub massacre in 2016. And it has many resources in short supply at some hospitals, like negative pressure rooms used to contain outbreak patients, the New York Times reported.
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(03-19-2020, 03:16 PM)MichaelM Wrote: Glad you're doing OK, smug. Thank you for letting us know how things stand there.

I am hoping all of you have been well and will remain so!
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I've always tried to be aware of how incredibly fortunate I am to have a 91-year-old grandmother whom I've grown accustomed to visiting regularly, but it's still sad to tell her that I have to abstract this to a relationship by phone call, indefinitely.
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(03-19-2020, 04:01 PM)schwartz Wrote: Wife is a cancer survivor with asthma.  Hopefully this self-quarantine stuff works.

Best wishes.  

I meant to update on my friend who had to go to the hospital.  He's beaten cancer twice (and has a multitude of other health issues).

Thankfully, the doctors think he just fainted.  They didn't consider him for testing.
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And Trump is now lying that we have imminent cures (or in his vocabulary, "real soon cures")

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/trump-cor...b7c54083b4

Quote:Trump repeatedly singled out one potential treatment drug during the press conference, the anti-malarial Chloroquine, which he falsely suggested had been approved for use against COVID-19.

“It’s been approved, they took it down from many, many months to immediate,” Trump said. “We’re gonna make that drug available.”

But the Food and Drug Administration has not approved Chloroquine for treating the coronavirus, an FDA spokesperson confirmed to Bloomberg News. Instead, Chloroquine is approved for treatment of malaria ― its primary intended use.  

A day earlier, Trump favorite Tucker Carlson, the Fox News host, aired a questionable segment in which his guest praised chloroquine.

Trump also told reporters during the conference on Thursday that a drug from the pharmaceutical company Gilead, called Remdesivir, is “essentially approved.” 

Gilead issued a statement to an MSNBC reporter hours later stating “Remdesivir is an investigational antiviral with limited data at this time ― it is not approved anywhere globally and has not been demonstrated to be effective or safe for any use.”

We elected Fox News as President.

Also... Gilead? Must be Mike Pence's favorite company.
Gamertag: Tweakee
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More Trump bullshit from that presser:

"The 500 million N95 air-filtering respirator masks President Donald Trump said the federal government ordered could take up to 18 months to be delivered, according to the grant application." 

https://news.bloomberglaw.com/health-law...to-deliver

Quote:The 500 million N95 air-filtering respirator masks President Donald Trump said the federal government ordered could take up to 18 months to be delivered, according to the grant application.

There has been a shortage of the masks, and health-care workers are being told to reuse them.

The government is expecting the masks to be delivered incrementally, according to the application, but will allow those deliveries to occur over 18 months. Manufacturers in China aren’t able to fulfill the request.

Health & Human Services Secretary Alex Azar could direct companies to produce and distribute the masks under an executive order signed Wednesday, but Trump said it would be used for a “worst-case scenario” and hopefully wouldn’t be needed.
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So, the GOP bill... sucks!

They're giving far less to poor people during a time of desperation.

Beyond cruel, but not surprising.

https://twitter.com/JStein_WaPo/status/1...0321772545

Quote:GOP bill on immediate checks:

-- $1,200 per person ($2,400 if filing jointly)
-- $500 per kid
-- Begins to phase out above $75K
-- Phases out completely above $99K
-- Much smaller benefit, of $600, for millions w/o federal tax liability

   
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Governor Wolf has shut down all non Life Sustaining businesses as of 8 pm tonight, and I have no idea if my category is considered as such.  Trying to text my supervisor now.
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Oh, jeez.

https://twitter.com/ZavalaA/status/1240749667362586624

Quote:Whoa—

In his letter to the President, Governor Gavin Newsom warns the state projects roughly 56% of California’s population will be infected with the virus over an 8 week period.

That’s 25.5 million people.

   
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(03-19-2020, 05:04 PM)Iron Maiden Wrote:
(03-19-2020, 04:01 PM)schwartz Wrote: Wife is a cancer survivor with asthma.  Hopefully this self-quarantine stuff works.

Best wishes.  

Just echoing the best wishes for your wife's health, schwartz.

(And, I hope it goes without saying, yours, too, Judas.)
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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It took a pandemic for the U.S. legislature to actually wake up to the fact that corporate buybacks should be banned.

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/19/trump-sa...louts.html

I've been railing against stock buybacks for years online.  Just openly predatory capitalism in action.

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(03-19-2020, 03:42 PM)Judas Booth Wrote:
(03-19-2020, 03:41 PM)Iron Maiden Wrote: A 34-year-old man who died just days ago after testing positive for COVID-19 recently visited Walt Disney World and Universal Studios in Florida:

https://www.foxla.com/news/glendora-man-...ida-report

Quote:A Glendora man who died just days ago after testing positive for COVID-19 recently visited Walt Disney World and Universal Studios in Florida, it was reported Thursday.

Family members of Jeffrey Ghazarian, 34, told TMZ that he died Thursday morning at a Pasadena hospital after being hospitalized for several days.

His sister told TMZ, "He suffered a lot and put up a good fight. We will miss our Jeff every day but we are thankful for all the fun happy memories of the times we had together."

Glad I tested negative already but now I'm worried about my wife...


Judas... 

"His family stated he had a history of asthma and frequent bronchitis as a child. He also had beat testicular cancer back in 2016, which made him a higher risk for contracting coronavirus."


I'm not saying don't worry about it, but this guy had a host of pre-existing conditions, in particular respiratory.

Ah, Vtran beat me to it. Either way, I'm certain you and your wife will be good, Judas!
If you're happy, you're not paying attention.

Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny: 
Glad that you guys worked that out amongst yourselves.

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(03-19-2020, 07:05 PM)Overlord Wrote: It took a pandemic for the U.S. legislature to actually wake up to the fact that corporate buybacks should be banned.

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/19/trump-sa...louts.html

I've been railing against stock buybacks for years online.  Just openly predatory capitalism in action.

Only in 1982 did the SEC change the laws to make corporate buybacks legal. This needs to be fixed ASAP.

Also, speaking as someone who lives just outside of San Francisco... Looks like based on what the governor of this state is saying, I might be staying inside for a while.

So glad that you are negative, Judas!
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I have a handful of "corporate" clients. Every single one of them that's retail-oriented has contacted me this week to inquire about topics such as: the legality of laying off their entire workforce, their potential sick leave exposure, whether they can challenge the closure laws, and/or whether they can escape their lease obligations.

The retail, brick and mortar small business owners are being devastated. Two of them have just told me their options are lay everyone off, declare bankruptcy, or find a loan somewhere.

We need a 60ish day moratorium on leases and mortgages.

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Minnesota classifies grocery store employees as emergency workers, grants them free childcare:

https://thehill.com/homenews/state-watch...cy-workers

Quote:Grocery store workers in Minnesota will now have access to free child care after the state classified them as emergency workers during the coronavirus outbreak, NBC News reported. 

An executive order signed by Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz on Sunday stated that emergency workers deemed “critical” to the state’s response to the outbreak would be provided child care.

The workers affected include “providers of healthcare, emergency medical services, long-term and post-acute care; law enforcement personnel; personnel providing correctional services; public health employees; firefighters and other first responders; and court personnel.”

Food distribution workers – which includes grocery store clerks, stockers and cleaning staff, as well as deli and produce staff – will also have access to free care for their children after Walz recently classified them as “Emergency Tier 2” workers, according to NBC News.
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I work in retail and frankly I'm terrified right now. On the plus side, corporate is giving full timers an extra 80 hours of personal/sick time. The way things are going, I might be going on another staycation sooner than later.
Mangy Wrote:TCM 2 is like sentient cocaine.
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(03-19-2020, 06:33 PM)mondguy Wrote: Governor Wolf has shut down all non Life Sustaining businesses as of 8 pm tonight, and I have no idea if my category is considered as such.  Trying to text my supervisor now.

 I live in PA and I already got the call from work that this doesn't effect where I work. I'm fine with that. Going to work has gives me sense of normality, which is comforting.

 Judas, its good hear your tests negative. I hope everyone stays safe.
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is I've lost my way. The good news is I'm way ahead of schedule!
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L.A. Times reporter:

https://twitter.com/johnmyers/status/124...6363217920

Quote:BREAKING: "We direct a statewide order for people to stay at home. That directive goes into force this evening," says 

@GavinNewsom
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(03-19-2020, 09:44 PM)Chaz Rock City Wrote: Judas, its good hear you testes negative.
Preserving this for posterity.
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It happens when you get married.
If I could change to liquid, I'd fill the cracks and bend the rocks.
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Oh my:

https://twitter.com/michaelsderby/status...3389669377

Quote:Goldman Sachs warns data point to a historic and frankly apocalyptic surge in unemployment insurance claims, from current 281,000 to 2,250,000 in next week’s report. Yes you read that right.

   
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Hang in there, Schwartz.


Quote:Also, speaking as someone who lives just outside of San Francisco... Looks like based on what the governor of this state is saying, I might be staying inside for a while.

Central CA here. Doing my best to keep away from other people, but had to go shopping for essentials today. Part of an overheard conversation between a guy stocking the shelves and the bread delivery guy:

"Of course it's a Chinese virus! It started in Wuhan, China!"
"Yep. They're always making him out to be the bad guy."
About half a minute later, the guy stocking shelves starts mocking another employee who has not been coming to work because of virus concerns.

So great to see people who work in a grocery store, HANDLING FOOD, take this seriously. God knows if they bother to wash their hands properly. Cretins like this are why I suspect 56% might be a conservative estimate.
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The bubble is being penetrated... in clusters:

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/19/us/po...rilot.html

Quote:The only thing that should have been different about the first Friday in March was the apple crisp. Heaven Frilot didn’t usually cook at the end of the workweek, instead letting her family snack on leftovers — a roast or pork chops she’d made earlier, maybe — or order pizza. But her 10-year-old son, Ethan, was having a friend over that night, and her husband, Mark, a lawyer, was coming off a crushing week of arbitration. She would bake an apple crisp.

Then Mark Frilot — 45 years old, “never, ever sick,” came home with a fever.

In the haze of days that followed, Ms. Frilot, a 43-year-old oil-and-gas analyst, occupied one world, the rest of her community in Kenner, La., another. She saw her friends making jokes on social media about the coronavirus — eye-roll emojis, Fox News talking points, Rush Limbaugh quotes writing off the threat. And then one person asked if anyone really had this thing.

Ms. Frilot had an answer to that.

“I have been seeing a lot of posts about people taking this virus lightly and joking about it,” she began in a Facebook post. “Mark has tested positive for the coronavirus.”

Days earlier, it never occurred to Ms. Frilot (pronounced FREE-low) that her husband’s fever that Friday — 99 point something or another, low enough that she teased him for being a wuss — would lead to this, even as his condition rapidly worsened.

By March 8, a Sunday, his temperature was 101.9. The flu, urgent-care doctors in Kenner told him.

Wednesday night, and the fever had worsened. “I just couldn’t break it,” Ms. Frilot said, remembering how she alternated between Tylenol and Advil, just as the doctor prescribed. She found her husband sitting on the edge of the bathtub, wrapped in a towel, talking to himself.

Thursday morning, emergency room. Thursday night, ICU. Friday morning, intubation. Saturday, coronavirus test results: positive.

Today, Ms. Frilot’s husband of 12 years remains quarantined in the ICU, hooked up to a ventilator, one of the 280-plus cases in Louisiana of the novel coronavirus rapidly spreading across the United States. On March 14, the day he received his diagnosis, Bourbon Street teemed with St. Patrick’s Day celebrants.

At first, Ms. Frilot limited who could see her Facebook post about her husband’s condition. “I am telling you this very private information because I care about my friends,” she said. “Please be extremely cautious and smart during this time. This virus has been in our community a while now without us knowing.” She shared that her husband had been misdiagnosed with the flu, and that this would be “a long recovery.” She said that because he was in quarantine, “I cannot even be there for him to help him get through this.”

Crises are only political until they are personal. As news of Mr. Frilot’s diagnosis spread, among his friends and on Nola.com, his story was no longer just that of a young, healthy person who caught a virus that young, healthy people had been told they were not supposed to catch. It was a revelation for the conservative suburbs of New Orleans, where many had written off the pandemic as liberal fear-mongering. Mr. Frilot, a registered Republican, and his family are generally apolitical, and were not thinking much about the virus — whether as a fiction or anything else — before he got sick. But many in their community had opinions on it from the start.

The language they used was the language politicians and media figures were also using. On March 8, when Mr. Frilot first went to urgent care, President Trump retweeted a joke from his White House social media director about Nero fiddling as Rome burned. The next night, Sean Hannity said on his prime time Fox News show that the virus was the media’s attempt to “bludgeon” Mr. Trump with “this new hoax.”

After Ms. Frilot shared her husband’s experience, she saw social-media musings about the virus as a liberal plot to tank the stock market come to a halt, toilet-paper jokes no longer rack up likes. Several people have called her “to pass on to me that everyone has been awakened,” Ms. Frilot said. “Because everyone knows Mark.”

Comments of disbelief, sorrow, promises of prayers rolled in almost immediately. A friend urged her to share her story more widely. Ms. Frilot was normally intensely private, but wasn’t that the point? That nothing was normal anymore? She made the post public.

Cheryl Pitfield, 61, a close friend and former co-worker of Ms. Frilot’s in the oil and gas industry, remembered reading it for the first time. “I just got chills,” she said. For Ms. Pitfield, before seeing her friend’s post, it didn’t seem like there was a face to the virus. “Now there is.”

She quickly sent a screenshot to friends in a group chat. “Oh my gosh,” Ms. Pitfield summed up the reaction, “this is real.”

Ms. Pitfield lives in Metairie, about 10 minutes from Kenner. Like many in the area, which is represented in Congress by House Minority Whip Steve Scalise, she is a supporter of President Trump. She, and many of her friends, she said, believed that the coronavirus was a political stunt and media-induced hysteria.

“We kept kind of joking about it, like, ‘Oh, this is crazy! This is not going to affect us, why is everyone so wigged out about it?’ And then it did,” she said. Reading about Mr. Frilot, she added, put it into perspective for her.

On Facebook, Kathy Perilloux shared a similar conversion. Before March 16, Ms. Perilloux’s page was almost solely posts questioning the severity of the virus. March 10: “Hurricane Corona …. HYPE …. sigh,” she wrote. (“I stole that from Rush, but I was thinking the same before he said it!!!!!” she added in a comment.)

Then Ms. Perilloux commented on Ms. Frilot’s post: “Your story puts a real face on a real danger, that’s what had been missing.” She hasn’t posted anything else about the pandemic.

Since Friday, March 13, Mark Frilot has managed just two breaths on his own.

Heaven Frilot is undergoing her own struggle for air. They had plans: Disney World for Easter, when Mickey and Minnie’s Runaway Railway would finally be open. More date nights at the Ritz, where they liked to listen to Jeremy Davenport play. “They just kept saying over and over that the people at risk were the elderly and those with underlying conditions,” Ms. Frilot said. “And we’re none of that.”

“This could have happened to anyone.”

Ms. Frilot was last with her husband when he was in the E.R., even after doctors decided to test him for the virus. She was asked to wear a mask. The mood was tense, chaotic, and she remembers the way the doctors and nurses looked at him. Like they were “scared,” she said, like “they didn’t want to come in the room.”

She later learned that her husband was the hospital’s first patient to test positive for the virus. The looks of fear, she now thinks, reflected how unprepared they were.

What she doesn’t understand is how, where, her husband contracted the virus in the first place. They hadn’t traveled at all in the last month, and Mr. Frilot usually works in a small satellite office. She worked up a list of everything they had done the week before her husband got sick, then contacted people whom they might have been around. “That was horrible,” she said.

And:

Quote:Katrina is the inflection point for so many in Louisiana. Today, it can help explain why for some in and around Kenner, the desire to minimize the threat of coronavirus feels a layer deeper than just allegiance to Mr. Trump, or distrust of the media.

“There were no grocery stores open, we were under curfew, helicopters were flying overhead nonstop,” Sheila DeLaup, 59, a small-business owner in Metairie, remembered. “We’ve been through that disruption of life,” she said, and no one wants to live that again.

Ms. DeLaup had “mixed emotions” at first about the virus. On the one hand, her fellow Trump supporters were insistent that it was being blown out of proportion, that the flu was far deadlier, that everyone was being ridiculous. On the other hand, she thought, “It’s not just us: Everyone around the world is reacting like this. Would everyone be throwing things out of proportion? Just to try and hurt the president?”

Ms. DeLaup found Ms. Frilot’s post on Facebook after mutual friends had shared it. “It wasn’t until I read her story that I thought, ‘You know, people are wrong.’”
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Yeah, today was my first work-at-home day and based on what Governor Newsom and Mayor Garcetti said, looks like it sure ain't gonna be my last.
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I wish Adam wouldn't eavesdrop on my important, work-related conversations with the bread delivery guy.
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Ruthless outsourcing of manufacturing (including critical medical supplies), no effective safety nets, no centralized authority to handle a crisis (ensuring a disastrous piecemeal response), utter lack of financial regulations concerning corporate affairs (stock buybacks, unfettered Board of Director control, out of control CEO pay), the erosion of real earning and saving powers of U.S. citizens, insanely high housing prices in much of the nation, little to no employee protections (paid leave, etc.), a nation that's over-leveraged at every level ... be it governmental, corporate, or personal ... with no ability to weather a downturn or catastrophe, a country so fractured that people distrust the media over something as clear-cut as a pandemic ...

It's like this virus is exposing everything fundamentally broken about the U.S. that's been getting worse for the last 30-40 years.

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