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Lost My Job
#1
Soooo... I abruptly lost my job yesterday after 15 years (for non-COVID reasons), and I'm pretty damn devastated. I rarely get personal on these boards, but I'm crushed and freaking out about what to do. Any advice would be helpful. Thanks y'all.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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#2
I'm so sorry, Mangy.

The only thing I can suggest is filing for unemployment as soon as possible.

https://www.careeronestop.org/WorkerReEm...apply.aspx
Mangy Wrote:TCM 2 is like sentient cocaine.
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#3
At least the stimulus package check will be coming your way within the next three weeks. There's a bit of a buffer, but yeah, jump on that unemployment if you can.

Time to buff up that resume and LinkedIn page. I don't really know what the interview process is like right now. I assume done through video chats.
"I'd rather have hope...than nothing at all."
-Illyana Rasputin, X-Men: Omega #1

"But the public, knowing what it wanted, spinning happily, let the comic books survive."
-Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

Twitter: @BartLBishop
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#4
First, I'm sorry. Losing your job fucking SUCKS. It's devastating emotionally, and professionally can seem like a huge ding against your self confidence. 

I had jobs eliminated in 2008, 2010, and 2014...so I have some experience with this. My suggestions:

If you're able to, I'd advise taking a week or so to just absorb, accept, and grieve. Give yourself a week to feel things, sleep in, do some things that take your mind off the immediate challenges. HOWEVER: I'd also advise, as you're able, to start making some lists of what you need to do: update your resume, update/join LinkedIn, have folks agree to act as references, etc. In this first week I'm not advising you do these things - just take a few minutes here and there to get a plan together for when you begin your search.

After 7-10 days, I recommend re-establishing a routine. Your new job is looking for a job; you need to treat it that way. Set specific goals with deadlines ("my resume will be updated by 4/6", for instance).  Treat your mornings as work time: working on credentials, searching listings, reaching out to contacts, and (eventually) following up on communications. If you need to, go to a Panera or Starbucks for your online/resume work; make that your "office", a place where you focus on the search without the distractions of TV, music, and family. 

If you're not on LinkedIn, you should be. And your LinkedIn profile should mirror your resume (or vice versa). 

Once you have the grunt work done (resume, LI profile, references arranged), my suggestion is setting a schedule/routine for yourself. Something I used to do was check certain sites on certain days: Mondays were for Monster, LinkedIn, Indeed. Tuesdays for CareerBuilder, Idealist.org, Etc. Some sites you may want to check daily. Many of them allow you to set up automatic searches/notifications, too.

In 2010 and 2014, I discovered something: once all my online profiles were done, once my resume was done, and once I was focused on applying, looking for work 8 hours day wasn't any more effective than looking for 4 (not counting interviews, or needing to send thank you/follow up emails, etc.).  If you're disciplined and consistent with your "work" routine of looking, you can give yourself permission to relax the second half of the day. It'll go a long way to keep you balanced and sane.

Semi-random thoughts:
  • If it's been that long since you've looked for a new job, I'd recommend getting a book or two on interview prep. That's a whole post of its own, but feeling ready for an interview is CRUCIAL.
  • Use social media, if you're on it. Don't be shy about letting friends and family knowing you're looking for work (but let them know what kind of work).
  • Follow up ALL interviews (phone, video, etc.) within 24 hours with a thank you email, customized from what you learned on why you're the best pic for the job.
  • Setting goals and schedules is KEY. I can't stress this enough. It helps you feel less powerless and helps get shit done in a time when you probably don't feel like doing anything.
  • Find healthy/productive ways to blow off steam or relax. Video games, movies, music, exercise. Personal projects.

I'm probably forgetting stuff, and I'm sure the other folks here can augment/correct my suggestions.

Again, let me say I'm so sorry, mangy. Losing your job is awful. Keep us posted and remember we're here for you.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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#5
I'm really sorry to hear that, Mangy. Even if it was for non-COVID reasons, I think you'd still be eligible for the beefed-up unemployment benefits that are just about to pass through Congress, because of the timing. Plus the check, like Bart said. Hang in there my friend.
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#6
After you've applied for a job, wait a week and then call the "office" (I'm sure human resources are working remotely right now) and say, "I'm just calling to check on the status of my application."

Find the human resource directors for the jobs you've applied for on LinkedIn and connect with them. Then send them a message saying essentially the same thing, "I'm just checking on the status of my application."

Keep your name "at the top of the pile."
"I'd rather have hope...than nothing at all."
-Illyana Rasputin, X-Men: Omega #1

"But the public, knowing what it wanted, spinning happily, let the comic books survive."
-Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

Twitter: @BartLBishop
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#7
Thanks so much everybody. It really, REALLY means a lot.

I've already signed up for FlexJobs, Careerbuilder and LinkedIn, and I'm filing for unemployment today. It's been less than 24 hours, so my mind is going in a million different directions, so MichaelM, I greatly appreciate you talking me down Smile

Thanks again everyone.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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#8
Bart's 100%: it's acceptable to check in with prospective employers. Doing so in a professional manner can help keep you in mind.

Also, here's my driving philosophy on the process:

The goal of applying for a job is to get an interview.

The goal of an interview is to get a job offer.

The goal of having a job offer is to be in the position of saying yes or no, rather than simply being told no.

I write this because a lot of people seem to treat the search process like it's therapy or some kind of sifting activity. It's not. Your ultimate goal is to get an offer. Period. Now, of course, you want to have a clear picture of what they're offering, what kind of culture the company has, and more. All of that matters. And it's not to say that you might encounter red flags big and bright enough to abort the process before reaching its natural conclusion. But, ultimately, you want to be the one with the decision making power. Not the other person/company.

(Having said that, let me also clearly say: never, ever lie about your experience or skills/capability. Ever. Don't claim to know something or be proficient in something you're not. If you can draw valid parallels or analogs, do so with gusto. But don't lie.)
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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#9
While I've been with the same company for just about 10 years now, my dad once told me to "keep my parachute packed", so I always update my CV at least once a year, just in case. This Covid-19 thing; however, has thrown all semblance of 'normal' job prospects out the window, and it IS scary. My partner is self-employed but her business has been declared 'closed' and she can't see customers until further notice, so we're down to a single income. She's anxiously waiting until April 6 when she can sign up for the just-announced $2,000/month, 16-week emergency assistance program from Canada's Trudeau government, as she's eligible for that. As for your case, Mangy, I'd get the ball rolling in filing for unemployment, while at the same time going through your list of contacts and friends and making some inquiries about job openings. Consider this: a lot of companies post openings internally and provide recommendation incentives to staff before posting them in public. This is how I got my last three jobs which have kept me continually employed (knock on wood) for the past 20 years. Hopefully your situation is only temporary but consider all options. All the best.
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#10
(03-27-2020, 09:45 AM)MichaelM Wrote: In 2010 and 2014, I discovered something: once all my online profiles were done, once my resume was done, and once I was focused on applying, looking for work 8 hours day wasn't any more effective than looking for 4 (not counting interviews, or needing to send thank you/follow up emails, etc.).  If you're disciplined and consistent with your "work" routine of looking, you can give yourself permission to relax the second half of the day. It'll go a long way to keep you balanced and sane.

This is really good advice. My wife switched careers a couple years back, and this was super important to remember for her mental health, yet surprisingly hard advice to follow at times. Looking for work IS a full time job, and you'll want to be at it 24/7, but eventually you get to a point where your resume just can't be tweaked anymore. Make sure you give yourself time to unplug and clear your head on a regular basis.
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#11
Thanks chief zabu... I've already sent emails to friends in order to hopefully get that ball rolling. One friend already sent me that Flexjobs link, which appears to be a great source for remote/freelance work, which is cool since our car died last week. (it hasn't been a great year)

EDIT: I'm out of rep so just assume that I'm repping everybody who posts, ha.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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#12
Sorry to hear this news, Mangy. A lot of good advice in this thread so I wish you the best of luck and I'm sure this respite will be temporary.
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#13
(03-27-2020, 09:45 AM)MichaelM Wrote: Your new job is looking for a job; you need to treat it that way. 

Michael's post was spot on but I wanted to single this sentence out as being especially correct.  Work your normal business hours and use that time to look for a job.

I'd also like to add: use this time to take care of yourself.  Eat right, exercise, and sleep.  Don't fall into bad self-care habits...keep yourself feeling good and operating well.  Exercise is particularly important as it'll keep your metabolism going, boost your endorphins, and help you sleep at night. Maintain your grooming habits as well so that you LOOK good at all times...it'll help you maintain your self image.

Also: don't change your daily schedule.  Don't get into the habit of staying up until 3am watching TV or playing games.  Take a week off as Michael said (if you can), but don't screw up your biorhythm.  

Best wishes and good luck!

Mangy: Fraid just pinged me. He wanted to let you know that he's sorry to hear about your job.
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#14
Yeah, echoing the general sentiments here; I've been out of employment a couple times in the last ten years, and it's never not nerve-wracking. Best advice I can offer is to make a point of getting back into a job as fast as you can; it's always easier to find a better job when you're currently employed.
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#15
Thanks everybody...thanks Fraid!
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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#16
I'm sorry Mangy. It's hard enough finding a job these days, let alone with all the other stuff happening. We all have your back!
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#17
Thanks atomtastic!

Just filed for unemployment, which is a helluva thing to type!

I think I'm more crushed at having to tell my family I lost my job more than actually losing the job. Wife and I have taken turns being miserable and consoling each other, and we've had the most mindless things imaginable playing in the background to distract us. I can now say I've wept during MACGRUBER.

Gonna step away, decompress and play with our dogs for a bit. Thanks as always!
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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#18
One thing: the timing of this may work to your advantage. You losing your job NOW probably won't merit a second look from anyone looking at your resume; they'll figure that you lost your job due to the virus situation. They may not pursue finding out 'why' you lost your job.
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#19
I'm sorry, Mangy. I lose jobs a bunch believe it or not (I'm going on furlough next week), and one thing that I've found effective when it comes to resume writing is including your "wins." A short bullet list of quantitative (or qualitative) improvements that you made (or collaborated on) in your role catches the eye of a potential employer moreso than just listing out your responsibilities. Then you'll be asked how you got your results during the interview, so you can provide specifics and steer the conversation away from nonsense questions like, "What made you interested in a job at our company?"
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#20
Yes to what bradito says. I have a CAR sheet I update and bring with me to interviews (or have handy for phone interviews):

Challenge, Action, Result.

Basically a list of projects I led or participated on - what the problem was, what my solution was, and what the (hopefully quantifiable) result was.

These things most definitely should appear as summarized bullet points on your resume.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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#21
Sorry to hear it Mangy.

This thread reminds me why we're so lucky to have this community beyond the entertainment value it provides when we get to overthink movies about space wizards.
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#22
I know it doesn't amount to much, but I'm proud as can be to be associated with the likes of you scoundrels. It gives me comfort to know there are genuinely decent human beings out in the world.

And they should really consider making a movie about wizards in space...

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#23
One filled with reckless plot choices.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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#24
And seagulls.
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#25
(03-27-2020, 01:29 PM)Judas Booth Wrote: And seagulls.

People often fight about which birds are the best birds,
But everybody can agree that seagulls are the worst.

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#26
Very sorry Mangy. I'd be crushed.

The above all sounds like good advice. I have none to offer since I suck at job hunting. I'd rather get flayed by Pinhead than type another cover letter again.
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#27
Haha, I understand kyle. I'm Googling resume templates as we speak.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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#28
The trick to cover letters is coming up with something where you only need to revise the salutation, the job title and the name of the company you're applying to, so you can quickly tweak them before sending to prospective employers.
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#29
Can I point out the irony that unemployment benefit extensions and a potential $1,200.00 stimulus check (what is that, maybe 10-20% of the monthly cost of rent, utilities, and food for a typical household?) are supposed to represent a salve for the working class while Wall Street and banksters receive unlimited zero percent interest loans?

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#30
(03-27-2020, 05:24 PM)bradito Wrote: The trick to cover letters is coming up with something where you only need to revise the salutation, the job title and the name of the company you're applying to, so you can quickly tweak them before sending to prospective employers.

Seconded.  Have a template that you like and then just tweak and save.

One thing, though: you need to ensure that somewhere in that first paragraph or so that you're naming the company that you're applying to and saying something specific about what it is that they do.  Interviewers like to know that you've actually done a little bit of research into the company and know what you're applying for vs just throwing darts at a dartboard.
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#31
Mangy, make sure you reach out to each and every industry connection. Networking, not mass resume bombardment or umpteen applications, is the best and most direct path to new employment.

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#32
yep. utilize your contacts to the fullest. It really is 'who you know', not 'what you know.'
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#33
(03-27-2020, 05:28 PM)Overlord Wrote: Can I point out the irony that unemployment benefit extensions and a potential $1,200.00 stimulus check (what is that, maybe 10-20% of the monthly cost of rent, utilities, and food for a typical household?) are supposed to represent a salve for the working class while Wall Street and banksters receive unlimited zero percent interest loans?

It's all so infuriating that I can't bear to pay much attention to it anymore.
Brigadier Cousins on PSN
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#34
Sorry to hear that Mangy. Hope things turn around for you soon.
Originally Posted by ImmortanNick 

Saw Batman v Superman.
Now I know what it's like to see Nickelback in concert.

That's my review.
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#35
Thanks, fett.

This week has been spent polishing my resume, contacting...contacts, applying for unemployment and health insurance and all that stuff. Most importantly, we got my wife's meds taken care of, which is great. It's stressful, but I'm doing as much as I can considering half the world is shut down.

The hard part is stepping away and getting out of "frantically seek work" mode . . . I'm going to shut down the laptop after this post and go have some downtime in the backyard. Grilling and playing with the dogs is always good for my mental health.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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