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Going to the Gym
Diva, I am SO glad you mentioned that about plates and bowls. I thought it sounded absolutely ridiculous, but I decided to try it. I went and bought smaller plates, bowls, and cups. I definitely have noticed food last longer. If I make a meal that typically would get devoured in one sitting, now it ends up being leftovers.

I do have meatless breakfasts, except the weekends. I tend to LOVE big leisurely breakfasts when i have the time, and with that comes meat.

It seems like I have started down the right track, I just need to kick it into high gear. I have started slowly moving to better nutritional meals (brown rice, wheat bread, more veggies, less red meat), but not to the length I think I need to.

I've got tomorrow off. I need to replenish my entire kitchen. If anyone has more quick/easy meals for a guy used to red meat, baked potatoes, and root beer everyday i will be very appreciated. I am the WORST at finding new foods to try because I absolutely despise the grocery store.

Fake rep to everyone!
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I'm Irish, too, Billy, so I get the meat and potatoes thing (except I'm an Irish vegetarian, sooo.... potatoes?). It took me a long time to shift my diet to a place that I consider both balanced and healthy (no small thanks due to DaveB, who is the most open-minded omnivore I know). The trick for me was to read cookbooks and really get into the idea of cooking and thinking about food. Cookbooks can be expensive, but public libraries tend to have huge cookbook collections (I've always got at least one checked out).

I've been using a great pair of books lately that are full of flexible, very simple, generally healthy meals that will lay a nice foundation for anyone starting out. The first, How to Cook Everything is a very basic, but excellent way to get into being in your kitchen. The other, by the same author, is How to Cook Everything Vegetarian. If you're looking to incorporate more vegetables and whole grains into your diet, I'd suggest you check that one out. Because of the way I eat, I prefer the latter, but both are really useful books for a kitchen novice.
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For a vegetable you can heat some extra virgin olive oil up in a pan, add two or three cloves of minced/chopped garlic (depending on if you like them) and red pepper flakes. Add green beans and toss for like four or five minutes and then your done. I say that amount of time because I like crispy beans and when you reheat them, they'll be soggy but still firm. This goes great when you make a few days worth of chicken I've found.

I'm with you though BillyG, eating better is hard at first, takes work and since I tend towards laziness, well this little recipe is easy and quick so I tend to make it often.
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Wow, you guys sure like to pan fry everything. For vegetables, it only takes a few minutes to steam them and they are delicious without any oil or butter. You can still add some flavor via spices if you like. As the link says, the veggies will remain crispy unless you let them sit for a while. Technically, you could steam chicken, but I find it is tastier to saute or bake meat.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Diva
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Wow, you guys sure like to pan fry everything. For vegetables, it only takes a few minutes to steam them and they are delicious without any oil or butter. You can still add some flavor via spices if you like. As the link says, the veggies will remain crispy unless you let them sit for a while. Technically, you could steam chicken, but I find it is tastier to saute or bake meat.

I steam or oven-roast all of my veggies, except baby spinach (it needs a little fat to put it over the top). The $6 we spent on that steamer was one of the better kitchen investments we've made.
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Yeah, I bought a steamer a few months ago and its my best friend.
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Don't have a lot of friends do you, Diva?
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I have plenty, they just aren't my BFF.
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I steam all the fresh vegetables that I plan on cooking, usually. Same with salmon, tilapia, etc. I'll bake either one on occasion or do a pan-seared salmon, but steamed veggies are awesome.
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To supplement my diet of fruits and vegetables, I've been drinking a glass of V8 juice (low sodium) mixed with orange juice to cut the taste down. One glass is usually 8 ounces V8 and 8 ounces OJ.

I will drink a glass of billylove's elixir of life usually after a workout and usually one other time during the day.
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I went today and bought a ton of better grub. Chicken breasts, whole grain pastas, lean turkey, yogurt, apples, bananas, and a shit ton of broccoli. Now to try and keep to it.

Which I won't tomorrow. CHUD get togethers harm diets.
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TheCallahan, I was reading an article on snacks that energize you, and it said how if your on an empty stomach the worst possible snack is carbohydrates because if you eat something like a cupcakes, you'll get a sugar rush and become tired. I thought the the whole article was interesting. Anyways heres the link if anyone wants to check it out http://www.24hourfitness.com/resourc...es/snacks.html
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Oh, just knock it off.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by MissZooey
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Oh, just knock it off.

Yep, did the same shit at the other place, just with a different article. Shill.
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a couple of thing on diet every one is different. Blood type can be a sign of what diet is best for you, so look it up.


beef, potatoes, white rice, and white bread are not good for you. Process carbohydrates lead to diabetes. you need hole grains, but wheat and whole grain rice are not the best whole grains to eat either, they are like the beef of the whole grain world. The best grains I like to eat are barley, oats, red rice, and black rice. if you are a meat lover like me instead of beef try bison, and ostrich meat. Also you should eat your carbs in the morning, and eat your greens and meats at night. eggs are really good for you. cow milk is not that good for you, better to drink goat milk. Watch your sugar in take, sugar is worse then smoking. fish can be good for you, but you need to drink tea with your fish, To get the heavy metals out of your system, but watch you caffeine intake.


Not that I do any of these things
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In terms of eating well, you could do worse than to check out Michael Pollan's In Defense of Food: An Easter's Manifesto.

One of his more compelling arguments is that our perspective on food has become negatively affected by nutritional research that sounds reasonable on its face, but is ultimately shortsighted and has led to vast economic success for the processed food industry and an unhealthy population.

Read this and his previous book, The Omnivore's Dilemma, you'll be off most processed foods in no time.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by DaveB
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In terms of eating well, you could do worse than to check out Michael Pollan's In Defense of Food: An Easter's Manifesto.

One of his more compelling arguments is that our perspective on food has become negatively affected by nutritional research that sounds reasonable on its face, but is ultimately shortsighted and has led to vast economic success for the processed food industry and an unhealthy population.

Read this and his previous book, The Omnivore's Dilemma, you'll be off most processed foods in no time.

Processed food are real bad for you. right now the only really good thing I am doing is eating a couple of table spoons a day of bee pollen. not that I am doing it for my healthly diet, but for allergies. also you should as much hurbs and spices to every meal you eat as you can take. the nutrimental value of hurbs and spices should not be over looked.
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I cut out the middle man and eat a gallon of preservatives. I will be like Han in the Empire Strikes Back.
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Wait, like carbonite frozen Han or grizzled, I don't give a fuck none Han? Both are viable options.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by eenin
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Processed food are real bad for you.

Yup, and even industrialized forms of non-processed foods are lacking.
Because of the way vegetables are now grown, we're actually getting less bang for our buck - we get just as many calories, but we're not getting as much nutrition. This means we stay hungry, crave more nutrients, and consume more calories in an attempt to keep ourselves nourished.

The descriptions of how cows are fed in The Omnivore's Dilemma put me off commercial beef for a while. It's not even just a matter of cruelty, it's the idea of eating something that's been pumped full of so many chemicals that it's literally ill all the time. They've basically been chemically converted to corn eaters from grass eaters because of corn's cheapness and availability. Unfortunately, it's not healthy for them, which means it's not healthy for us, either.

For the record, a little red meat isn't all that bad for you - it's all contextual. Some societies live quite healthily on diets that don't adhere to the West's notions of nutrition. There aren't all that many absolutes when it comes to diet.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by DaveB
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The descriptions of how cows are fed in The Omnivore's Dilemma put me off commercial beef for a while. It's not even just a matter of cruelty, it's the idea of eating something that's been pumped full of so many chemicals that it's literally ill all the time. They've basically been chemically converted to corn eaters from grass eaters because of corn's cheapness and availability. Unfortunately, it's not healthy for them, which means it's not healthy for us, either.

This is one of the reasons I'm glad my father-in-law is a farmer/rancher. It's nice knowing where your beef comes from.

But I don't get how processed foods are bad. Are you telling me my Little Debbie Zebra Cakes are unhealthy? Fuck you!
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Quote:

Originally Posted by DaveB
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Yup, and even industrialized forms of non-processed foods are lacking.
Because of the way vegetables are now grown, we're actually getting less bang for our buck - we get just as many calories, but we're not getting as much nutrition. This means we stay hungry, crave more nutrients, and consume more calories in an attempt to keep ourselves nourished.

The descriptions of how cows are fed in The Omnivore's Dilemma put me off commercial beef for a while. It's not even just a matter of cruelty, it's the idea of eating something that's been pumped full of so many chemicals that it's literally ill all the time. They've basically been chemically converted to corn eaters from grass eaters because of corn's cheapness and availability. Unfortunately, it's not healthy for them, which means it's not healthy for us, either.

For the record, a little red meat isn't all that bad for you - it's all contextual. Some societies live quite healthily on diets that don't adhere to the West's notions of nutrition. There aren't all that many absolutes when it comes to diet.

I agree on both the not getting as much nutrition and the feeding habits of Cows. That is just one of the many reasons to try bison and ostrich. they may cost a little more, but they taste better and are good for you. hurbs and spices help get you more nourish. I also feel less hunger when eating bee pollen, but just may be the bad taste in my mouth
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Quote:

Originally Posted by gravedigger
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Are you telling me my Little Debbie Zebra Cakes are unhealthy? Fuck you!

Sorry, gravedigger, but they're made from corn-fed zebra. Not free-range.
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I bumping this thread because I just started trying to go back to the gym again after being basically the laziest person in the world for the past 9 months. It turns out that working at home and a horrible winter can lead to months of just sitting on your ass. It's not the only culprit but it's helped exacerbate a years long malaise that I've been suffering through.

Anyway, I've been to the gym 3 times since Sunday and went running yesterday. The gym hasn't been too bad since I've been trying to ease my way back into some semblance of a decent routine. I've been going a little lighter on weights and focusing on doing some stretches and just getting my body used to working out again.

The running though, that almost killed me. I don't think I even ran a mile and I felt like I was a 30 year smoker trying to run a marathon (and I've never smoked a cigarette in my life). I was hacking and coughing the rest of the evening. From that little bit and inadequate stretching apparently, my whole lower body is sore.

And I love it. There's nothing quite like the feeling soreness and rejuvenation as your body shakes off the metaphorical sediment and rust that has been accruing.

I'm heading out of town on business next week so that'll be a real test. Can I keep up with my workouts even though I'm in meetings all day and going out in the evenings with co-workers? I'm hoping so and will be bringing some gym clothes with me but I know it can be tough (especially with the who knows how crappy gym equipment that they've got at hotels and the fact that I'm probably not going to be renting a car).

As far as getting back to a healthy diet, I always find that once I start working out more, I hate throwing all that effort away with a single can of soda or burger. So I find that if I start working out first and then move to eating healthier, it tends to work better for me. Plus, since the warmer weather is here I can just go back to cooking everything on the grill (no dishes!).
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Quote:

Originally Posted by dontEATnachos
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I bumping this thread because I just started trying to go back to the gym again after being basically the laziest person in the world for the past 9 months. It turns out that working at home and a horrible winter can lead to months of just sitting on your ass. It's not the only culprit but it's helped exacerbate a years long malaise that I've been suffering through.

Anyway, I've been to the gym 3 times since Sunday and went running yesterday. The gym hasn't been too bad since I've been trying to ease my way back into some semblance of a decent routine. I've been going a little lighter on weights and focusing on doing some stretches and just getting my body used to working out again.

The running though, that almost killed me. I don't think I even ran a mile and I felt like I was a 30 year smoker trying to run a marathon (and I've never smoked a cigarette in my life). I was hacking and coughing the rest of the evening. From that little bit and inadequate stretching apparently, my whole lower body is sore.

And I love it. There's nothing quite like the feeling soreness and rejuvenation as your body shakes off the metaphorical sediment and rust that has been accruing.

I'm heading out of town on business next week so that'll be a real test. Can I keep up with my workouts even though I'm in meetings all day and going out in the evenings with co-workers? I'm hoping so and will be bringing some gym clothes with me but I know it can be tough (especially with the who knows how crappy gym equipment that they've got at hotels and the fact that I'm probably not going to be renting a car).

As far as getting back to a healthy diet, I always find that once I start working out more, I hate throwing all that effort away with a single can of soda or burger. So I find that if I start working out first and then move to eating healthier, it tends to work better for me. Plus, since the warmer weather is here I can just go back to cooking everything on the grill (no dishes!).

What can you bench?
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Haha, I have no idea but I'm sure it's really really low. I am not even going to do free weights for another week or week and a half because I'm just that out of shape.
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dontEATnachos, I keep a copy of this onhand when I know I'll be somewhere that I won't have equipment(though I do take resistance bands places where equipment might be a questionable prospect). Between that and a couple of plyometric exercises added in, it usually works out fine until I'm able to get back to some place with weights.

As far as getting back into running, you'd be better off lowering the intensity and increasing the duration of your runs - definitely stick with measuring your efforts by time rather than distance for now, and if you're significantly overweight, I'd even suggest a walking/jogging interval program to get you started - walk five minutes briskly for warmup then jog 30-60sec, walk 2-3min, jog 30-60sec, repeat several times and then do a 5min. walking cooldown.

Either way, timing your runs rather than measuring distance will help improve your metabolic conditioning, and once you feel significantly less tired after, say, 30-45 minutes, then you can start factoring in distance. If you're more interested in the running portion than weights, google the "Couch to 5K" program. It's worked for a lot of people so far and comes pretty highly recommended.

Good luck, and don't hesitate to ask any questions.
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When I first started running (not too long ago), my goal was 2 miles or 20 minutes. Whichever came first. This was useful because if I was feeling particularly tired that day, I'd run at a slower speed and go for time. But if I had energy and could run at a faster speed, then I could hit 2 miles in no time.

My current goal is 3 miles or 30 minutes. I can run at a 10-minute mile pace for only about 10 minutes, so I usually do one mile at a moderate pace, pick it up for the second and depending on my energy level remain at that pace or slow down a bit for the third mile. I have to say, whomever said at 20 minutes you get a runner's high was full of it.

Now this is all on the treadmill. If I attempted to run outside and had to keep my own pace, I'd burn out quickly trying to keep up with everyone around me.
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Yeah, I used to do a lot of running. I was training for a marathon a while back (and got up to running about 10 miles) before I injured my back on the incline bench ... I just had to get those 2 more reps in. That injury teamed up with a slowly building lack of motivation and started my slow downward spiral to complete laziness.

I used mix it up and run some on the treadmill for guaranteed pace and some on the ground for the sense of speed and to work out those muscles that don't quite get full use on the treadmill. I also find that running at even just a 2% incline on the treadmill makes running on the ground seem so much easier/fun.

Once it's nice enough outside I kind of mix it up some. I like the fact that I can burn a lot of calories very quickly with running though, so I was trying to do at least 10 minutes of that a day. The other stuff I'd switch up between the elliptical, biking outside, or the stair climber.

Now that I work from home though, the hardest part is just making sure I get out of the house. It's so easy to just convince myself that I'm too tired or have too much to do to take the hour or two that going the gym will eat up. So I just tell myself, go to the gym ... you can leave after 15 minutes if you're too tired. Once I get in there though, I love it and have a good time.
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I took a good look at myself in that pic I posted in the Chewervision thread of me playing Rock Band and thought, "Sweet Jesus, that just ain't right." So I started walking every day, a mile first, then up to two miles. Then I decided that since my fiancee already has a gym membership, I'd go ahead and sign up too and we could go together and keep each other motivated.

So from 236 pounds when that photo was taken, I'm down to 225 now. There was about a week and a half when my parents were visiting that I got off the program a little bit, or else that would have gone down more. I'm trying to get to 200 just to have a reasonable goal so I don't get discouraged. According to the charts I've seen, the ideal weight for my height is 165 pounds, but I'd be happy in the 180-185 range, since that seems like it would fit my frame better.

I'm already seeing benefits. I used to have difficulty sleeping on my back because of all the extra weight pushing down on my diaphragm, but now that doesn't happen anymore. And my stamina seems a lot better too. I'm not looking to get buff, I'm just looking to not have a heart attack when I'm 50.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Richard Dickson
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I took a good look at myself in that pic I posted in the Chewervision thread of me playing Rock Band and thought, "Sweet Jesus, that just ain't right." So I started walking every day, a mile first, then up to two miles. Then I decided that since my fiancee already has a gym membership, I'd go ahead and sign up too and we could go together and keep each other motivated.

So from 236 pounds when that photo was taken, I'm down to 225 now. There was about a week and a half when my parents were visiting that I got off the program a little bit, or else that would have gone down more. I'm trying to get to 200 just to have a reasonable goal so I don't get discouraged. According to the charts I've seen, the ideal weight for my height is 165 pounds, but I'd be happy in the 180-185 range, since that seems like it would fit my frame better.

I'm already seeing benefits. I used to have difficulty sleeping on my back because of all the extra weight pushing down on my diaphragm, but now that doesn't happen anymore. And my stamina seems a lot better too. I'm not looking to get buff, I'm just looking to not have a heart attack when I'm 50.

What can you bench?
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Attaboy Dickson!
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Overlord
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What can you bench?

About this much, punk!
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Your impertinence is intolerable!
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Found this post on Amazon.com while reading reviews for MuscleTech Hydroxycut.

Quote:

4 of 18 people found the following review helpful:
4.0 out of 5 stars Great product with a couple side effects, January 14, 2008
By Sonny Tapp "Sonny" (Chicago, IL USA) - See all my reviews
I was entering a 3 month program to train retired Navy Seals to battle with tigers in India and I needed something to give me an edge. I used to fight pumas when I was younger but my confidence was a bit low after an incident I had with a leopard a few months prior. This product was the ticket. I would take three of these in the morning and wander around my apartment listening to metal and punching holes in my walls. The added boost of energy made it easy to break stuff, and the amount of "crazy" it released made it even easier to clean up after myself. I would kick something or punch something and immediately fix it. After the initial rage wears off (usually about 15 minutes), the "dizzy sweats" set in. It's normally not too bad but one time I fell down three flights of stairs. Luckily, the Hydroxycut kept me safe from injury. My training sessions went incredibly smooth and hardly anyone got hurt. By the end of one month on this product I had torn most of my clothes to shreds because I was so ripped. I don't need shirts anymore anyway because I look amazing.

Almost bought some right there.
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