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Horror RECOMMENDATION or WARNING thread.
(10-04-2018, 12:09 PM)electrichead Wrote: I recently saw Tusk, the film by Kevin Smith.

It was interesting in the least, not what I was expecting.

Michael Parks did a great job here, what a loon.

The Justin Long "shock podcast" character was an ass for sure.

I thought it was pretty good overall.

A large part of that film is kind of great but then Johhny Depp shows up.
“I call upon you to stop this musical now,” she said to the board. “You tear a community apart if you don’t.” -Prachi Ruina                                                            
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yes, it seemed like unneeded quirks in a character, probably could have been handled a different way.

I liked how Osment was taking care of his buddy's girlfriend.
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(10-04-2018, 01:13 PM)electrichead Wrote: I liked how Osment was taking care of his buddy's girlfriend.
Ohh he sure was.
“I call upon you to stop this musical now,” she said to the board. “You tear a community apart if you don’t.” -Prachi Ruina                                                            
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Tusk was 75% there, just an edit here and there (ahem Depp) and it might've been an all-timer. I stand convinced that Kevin Smith of all people could deliver an effective horror film.
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(10-04-2018, 08:14 PM)DerekM Wrote: Tusk was 75% there, just an edit here and there (ahem Depp) and it might've been an all-timer. I stand convinced that Kevin Smith of all people could deliver an effective horror film.

He really could, he just had to fuck it up with utter nonsense. And now he is into this weird thing where is intentionally making bad films I guess....
“I call upon you to stop this musical now,” she said to the board. “You tear a community apart if you don’t.” -Prachi Ruina                                                            
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Tusk was where I lost interest in even Kevin Smith's intentional failures.
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Man, The Devil's Doorway really sucked IMO. It's noble to shed a light on the real world cruelty and evil of Magdelene laundries, but they sort of undermine that with the direction they take the satanic/occult elements. That leaves you with a very by the numbers and frankly unambitious found footage demonic possession movie.

Going the found footage route - which in itself strains your audience's suspension of disbelief if it's not done well - and setting it in 1960 struck me as a big misstep. I know they shot (parts of?) it on actual 16mm but I found that the majority of it still looks and feels entirely like a product of 2018, and they made the distracting choice of overtly editing and scoring it like a horror movie.

I guess doing a period found footage movie is where the ambition comes in but for me it failed at it and nothing else about the movie inspired me to give points for trying. I mean really if nothing else there could've at least been some more effective and creative scares but it's like they don't really even attempt that much and it's all stuff you've seen in a million other modern supernatural horror movies.
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(10-03-2018, 04:48 AM)arjen rudd Wrote: Yes, Hell Fest is hardly the shitstain you may have been led to believe. It's a totally alright slasher throwback. If you wish they made more movies like The Burning or My Bloody Valentine, it's a solid entry.

Yes I do agree.

(10-03-2018, 06:20 PM)mike j Wrote: I'm going to have to disagree on Hell Fest. Great concept and outstanding production design but I loathed the characters. Even by slasher movie standards, they were bad. Dynamics and background stories were hinted at but never elaborated on. And that ending.

(10-04-2018, 01:43 AM)bradito Wrote: Hell Fest needed about a half-dozen more inventive kills. There's only one that's really great.

I can't even disagree strongly with those points, and yet I still liked the film.

(10-05-2018, 09:02 PM)dan benenson Wrote: Man, The Devil's Doorway really sucked IMO.

That's a shame; what you said about its failings are big demerits to me so I suddenly I am not so interested in the film, and it's disappointing.

Speaking of that term, tonight I saw the 1972 TV movie Something Evil; it was something, alright... not very good. And that is with SPIELBERG as the director. Even he does not care for the flick so that's why it has never officially been released for rental or purchase and I had to watch it on YouTube. It's more dull than scary and that's a shame considering the director, the cast (Sandy Dennis, Darren McGavin, Ralph Bellamy) and the screenwriter being Robert Clouse. The setting of a rural Pennsylvania farm should have been cool but instead the "evil" is represented by... wind and glowing jars. Not exactly spine-tingling. Then the final few minutes happen and while I can't say it wasn't teased beforehand, a twist happens and how in the blue hell did the characters figure it out? While it wasn't filmed badly, the movie is disappointing and Duel is MUCH better both overall and in terms of being terrifying.
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I watched a film last night called Malevolent, a british haunted house movie that has come on Netflix as 'an original'

The set up is good with a team of fake mediums/investigators doing cons on the locals in Scotland, and it has a great scare early on, but after that it just devolves into seen it all before and eventual torture.

So in summary - watch the trailer and don't bother with the rest.
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(10-06-2018, 03:44 AM)The Perfect Weapon Wrote: Speaking of that term, tonight I saw the 1972 TV movie Something Evil; it was something, alright... not very good. And that is with SPIELBERG as the director. Even he does not care for the flick so that's why it has never officially been released for rental or purchase and I had to watch it on YouTube. It's more dull than scary and that's a shame considering the director, the cast (Sandy Dennis, Darren McGavin, Ralph Bellamy) and the screenwriter being Robert Clouse. The setting of a rural Pennsylvania farm should have been cool but instead the "evil" is represented by... wind and glowing jars. Not exactly spine-tingling. Then the final few minutes happen and while I can't say it wasn't teased beforehand, a twist happens and how in the blue hell did the characters figure it out? While it wasn't filmed badly, the movie is disappointing and Duel is MUCH better both overall and in terms of being terrifying.

I actually kind of like this one, though it is certainly lower in quality than DUEL or Spielberg's NIGHT GALLERY work.
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The Unseen (1980) Barbara Bach

Well...this ended up as a big pile of not much. Seemed derivative of about twenty different movies. Half of which probably came out that year. Meh..
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(10-06-2018, 10:43 AM)Belloq87 Wrote: I actually kind of like this one, though it is certainly lower in quality than DUEL or Spielberg's NIGHT GALLERY work.

Yeah, I've seen other fans of the film so you aren't the only one.

(10-06-2018, 10:44 AM)fraid uh noman Wrote: The Unseen (1980) Barbara Bach

I'll make sure then to have this movie be unseen by me, even if it features the likes of Bach, Stephen Furst and Sydney Lassick.

Last night I saw Tales from the Hood. There's a movie I have watched a few times before but the last viewing was like in 2011 so it was time. Boy, some moments are sadly more prescient now than they were back then; no shock then that a sequel just came out and I understand it updates some of the themes presented here. Even if it isn't until next Halloween I'll check that out; the original is still pretty good and Clarence Williams III is still the highlight.
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Watched the third movie in a quadrilogy of horror movies, by Amando de Ossorio, about undead "Knights Templar".  The Ghost Galleon.

I honestly had never heard of any of these movies, and stumbled upon them when I was looking for some older horror movies to watch on Netflix DVD.  Are they good movies?  Not really, but they have pretty great atmosphere, and the soundtracks are suitably creepy.  The "knights" themselves are both creepy and hilariously cheesy.  For some reason, they chose to have the hands/arms of the "dead" be fake, so instead of just having someone's hand covered in makeup, they are just guys holding the equivalent of what appear to be "puppet" arms.  This makes them more "cute" than scary in some instances.  Tiny little hands reaching out to kill should be scary, but oftentimes it is more funny than it is creepy.

They also move incredibly slow, unless of course they are riding horses(!) when chasing their victims.  There is some gore and a bit of nudity in each of the films, but overall they are quite tame compared to other horror movies of the time.

The basic concept of the "blind dead" is that they sacrificed a virgin(s) in order to live forever and now are cursed to hunt for blood for eternity, or at least these four movies.  All in all, not something I would recommend going out of your way to watch, but worth checking out if you are looking for a horror movie with good atmosphere, but not much else.

I will give these movies some credit and say that they are very nihilistic, in that, pretty much **SPOILERS** no one ever manages to kill the knights.  They always end with them, basically, winning, despite some characters escaping in some way.  Of the three I watched, none of them are really connected and each movie is just another excuse to bring the knights back in increasingly preposterous ways.

Here is a list of the movies.  By the third one, I guess they decided to drop the whole "blind dead" association, and I believe they only reference that they might be "blind" in the second movie, and that is only a passing mention which also allows the main characters to escape by sneaking away quietly.

Tombs of the Blind Dead
Return of the Blind Dead
The Ghost Galleon
Night of the Seagulls - Haven't watched this one yet, but plan on checking it out in the next month or so, just to finish the quadrilogy.  Also, considering the fact that they are rare, and Netflix has a problem with getting new DVD's once they ones they have disappear, I'm a little more motivated to watch them than I normally would be, considering that they are by no means "classics".

Anyone else ever watched any of these?

One note, if anyone decides to watch these, you need to watch the Spanish language versions as I guess the English versions edit a lot of the movie and even move certain scenes around.  I only knew this from reading the reviews on Netflix DVD.  Glad I did, as it already doesn't make a ton of sense when watching the "correct" versions.
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If I recall correctly, I think Nick was involved in a possible remake of one of the Blind Dead films.
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(10-08-2018, 12:34 PM)RCA Wrote: Night of the Seagulls

Anyone else ever watched any of these?

One note, if anyone decides to watch these, you need to watch the Spanish language versions as I guess the English versions edit a lot of the movie and even move certain scenes around.  I only knew this from reading the reviews on Netflix DVD.  Glad I did, as it already doesn't make a ton of sense when watching the "correct" versions.

I've seen Tombs of the Blind Dead and Night of the Seagulls. The latter has a silly title but to its credit, there are seagulls in it.
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I see we're talking about The Endless in here for some reason.

But yeah, just watched it on Netflix. I've gotta say, I don't usually go for the super-low-budget genre indies, especially ambitious ones like this, just because the cheesy factor and DIY seams tend to show too much and take me out of the experience, but The Endless really does have a lot going for it. Though they weren't great, I think the directors did an okay job as the leads (wondering if they did that for budget reasons?) and I actually thought the supporting cast was quite good for the most part.

I was really impressed by what they were able to pull off with this film with a budget that I'm sure was very, very little. The FX aren't great but they get the job done in an abstract kind of way. The directors were very clever, though, about how they shot and edited the film, and that really went a long way towards selling the set-pieces. There are some core ideas to this story that work very well, and it really does become quite engaging about mid-way through.

Unfortunately the ending has the worst set-piece, and the dramatic resolution they go for feels kind of forced and abrupt. It's not a "bad" ending, per se, but unfortunately I don't think it really capitalizes on the set-up.
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Re-watched The Devil's Rejects last night. Still Zombie's best by a country mile.
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(10-08-2018, 12:34 PM)RCA Wrote: Anyone else ever watched any of these?

One note, if anyone decides to watch these, you need to watch the Spanish language versions as I guess the English versions edit a lot of the movie and even move certain scenes around.

Many years ago I saw both Tombs of the Blind Dead and Return of the Blind Dead; unfortunately they were the English versions and I've never gotten around to tracking down the original cuts of those movies or the other sequels. IIRC, I thought the two I saw were fine.
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If anyone wants to use it, go here and use SPIRIT for a 30-day free trial of Shudder: http://ms.spr.ly/6017r7leV
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Speaking of Shudder, they just added the much buzzed-about Argentinian movie Terrified. I checked it out tonight and gotta say I was disappointed. There are some cool ideas and visuals in there but the movie doesn’t really explore them enough or use them to their full potential. It feels all choppy and unfocused. Also a few parts came off as (I think) more comedic than intended, but maybe I'm wrong there. It's still kinda worth watching I think, especially since it seems to have worked better for a lot of other people, but to me it felt like a waste of potential.

I'm still hopeful about Shudder's other heavily hyped exclusive, Satan's Slaves, which I'll definitely be watching before the end of the month.

I liked three other recent releases though: Await Further Instructions, Housewife, and Don't Leave Home. The latter two are sort of a hard sell though...

First, it's almost a mistake to call Don't Leave Home a horror movie, I mean it makes sense to categorize it that way because it does have an eerie atmosphere and deals with the supernatural, but the way it's marketed sets up an expectation for "scares" when really it's more of a weird existential/metaphysical mystery, but definitely an engaging one.

Housewife on the other hand is unquestionably horror, but also very strange. Much like the director's first film Baskin it's got a dreamlike Argento-esque quality (and heavily Italian horror influenced visuals and even one scare that is a direct homage/lift from a Mario Bava movie), but even though there's some gnarly violence sprinkled throughout it's even more focused on the psychological side of things. A bit like Don't Leave Home in the sense that there some stretches that are less creepy or scary than just sort of weird and intriguing, but instead of resolving into more of a supernatural drama it gets progressively more nightmarish. And unlike the disjointed nature of Terrified I felt like Housewife's unconventional storytelling style still gave me everything I needed, if that makes sense. The director definitely has a distinct style and it's going to be interesting watching him develop.

Await Further Instructions is the easiest of the three to recommend, it's basically just a really tight and enjoyable Twilight Zone story that ramps up to full blown Cronenberg/Shinya Tsukamoto style madness in the third act. On a surface level the social commentary seems kinda simple and well-tread but after it was over I thought about some of the specifics and realized it's open to a more timely and nuanced interpretation, and regardless of that aspect it's just an entertaining paranoid/claustrophobic thriller.
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(10-11-2018, 06:56 PM)shaunh Wrote: If anyone wants to use it, go here and use SPIRIT for a 30-day free trial of Shudder: http://ms.spr.ly/6017r7leV

Thanks, I've wanted to try this, but the 7 day trial wasn't going to be long enough to check it out.

Seem like a good month to take a look.
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Watched TERRIFIER the other day. I'd heard bad things but surprisingly enjoyed it quite a bit. The villain is creepy and the movie has an appealing single-mindedness. It makes other slashers seem downright complex by comparison.

Also started on THE HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE. Decent opener if not quite as engaging as I'd hoped it would be. It all feels a bit cliche so far, but seeing as it's just the start a little table-setting is forgivable. The creepiest thing about it is that somehow between the flashbacks and the present day, Henry Thomas (almost 50 himself) turned into Timothy Hutton, which is juts a bizarre choice.
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Terrifier (not to be confused with TerrifieD) is awesome! Singleminded is a great way to describe it, it’s very stripped down and I think that serves it well. Plus it’s so brutal and nihilistic, but still has a lot of atmosphere, and the villain is an inexplicable malevolent force. It’s basically like my ideal slasher movie.
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This weekend, I went to an annual 24-hour horror marathon I try to attend every year.  I feel like this was the best one yet for various reasons.  All will be explained:

Goke, Bodysnatcher from Hell - The marathon kicked off with this space, vampire flick from Japan.  I've certainly read about it over the years, but this was my first time seeing it.  It's from the late 1960s, so there's a psychedelic vibe and a vibrant color palette that Tarantino reused for Kill Bill, Vol. 1 for a plane scene.  Unfortunately, the 35mm print was dubbed, but it didn't bother me much.  I had a lot of fun with this, and post-WWII, there were heavy anti-war overtones to go along with that.  I loved the ending.

The Mafu Cage - I had never even heard of this film.  It's about mental illness, and it goes in some very dark directions.  It's not for everyone, and I talked with a few people afterwards who found it problematic or offensive.  Others really enjoyed it for being a genuinely unsettling film, which it is.  On a cooler note, this late 70's flick stars two great women (Lee Grant and Carol Kane) and was directed by Karen Arthur.

Lord of Illusions - My reaction to this film is precisely why we go to the movies.  I caught this flick at home about five years ago and wasn't really impressed.  Seeing it with an amped-up crowd really breathed new life into it.  It's far from perfect, but there are some unsettling moments that made me wish Clive Barker directed more movies.  Afterwards, star Kevin O'Connor showed up for a Q&A where he talked about his career and growing up in Chicago.  I met with him because we went to the same high school; we swapped teacher stories and he was super nice.

The Lodger - A new digital copy was presented, and it was accompanied by a jazzy score from a band that played in front of the stage.   It very much felt like a once-in-a-lifetime experience, and I took none of it for granted.  Alfred Hitchcock has better movies, but one can start to see him building his style here.  That scene when the lodger first arrives at the house?  Iconic.

Blame it on Toby - This was the world premier for this 52-minute short about an eccentric billionaire who carries a doll everywhere and the gay couple he befriends.  Kevin O'Connor stars, and his comedic timing is well showcased.  I didn't quite understand everything, but I had a fun time with it.  Lots of good laughs.

The Children - Here's another flick I had never seen before.  The two curators of this marathon really wanted to screen this, so they went back-and-forth with the company that owned it for a good while.  The company couldn't figure out why anyone would want to screen it but gave permission for free, as long as the theater did all the work.  A digital copy was presented, and it got the biggest crowd reaction of the day.  I loved it.  The sound design is particularly great, and the kills are extremely effective.  I'm getting the idea that not many ever got to experience this film in a theater, so I feel pretty lucky.  I can't imagine it playing half as well solo in front of a laptop.

Child's Play - This isn't the first time this marathon nabbed this film, so I got some shuteye toward the second half.  The crowd loved it, naturally.  The treat was Don Mancini coming out afterwards for a Q&A.  He was very open about his initial ideas for the script and putting together all the sequels.  He didn't give a lot of information about the television series, but did say to expect two more films.  The host mentioned the upcoming remake, but Mancini remained coy.

Opera - We got a 35mm print of the uncut version.  What was particularly amazing was that the print came from Argento's personal collection; he's friends with one of the curators and let him borrow it!  This is a film that needs to be seen on the big screen, and the print was in pristine condition.  I got a little sleep here-and-there, but i did a good job fighting it.  Opportunities like this are too rare for sleep to get in the way.

Freddy vs. Jason - I saw this one on opening night and many times since, but I'm way too big a fan of both characters to sleep.  The film played well with the crowd; the fights got huge applause and the bad dialogue got howling laughter.  I mean, this is bad, but the stuff you want to see is fine.

Sleepaway Camp II: Unhappy Campers - It had been a long time since I had seen the Sleepaway Camp sequels, but I figured it was time for a bit more sleep.  The crowd was super energetic for a 5 am screening, so I successfully fought that for the first 30 minutes, but that was it.  I'm disappointed because I know it just won't be the same watching it alone.  Still, it was pretty cool catching the bits I did in a good-looking 35mm print.

Body Melt - If I didn't sleep during Unhappy Campers, I would've slept during the biggest get of the festival, so I can't say I have too many regrets.  I know this Australian film was a hard-to-find bootleg for a very long time - not sure how easy it is to find nowadays.  What I do know is that it's fucking bizarre.  If you gave me a full paragraph to describe the plot, I don't think I could.  It's a lot of fun, but I think its reputation is more because of its scarcity.  The 35mm print is the only one left in the world and came directly from the director's house in Australia.  Apparently, it might be going on a mini-tour now that it's here, but the director doesn't plan on showing it ever again, so try to get to a screening if you can.

Wicked, Wicked - This one seemed super interesting, but I desperately needed some more sleep.  I missed 90% of the movie, which was filmed in Duo-Vision.  Obviously, Duo-Vision never took off.  What is it?  It's a film that's constantly got a split-screen.  The way the curator talked the film up, he made it seem like an oddball curiosity that sort of plays like an arthouse flick.  The crowd seemed to like it, but I have no opinion.  Like Body Melt, the very last known 35mm print was played for this.

Fright Night Part 2 - The last film of the marathon was one I hadn't seen since in a good 20 years.  I don't recall every really caring about this sequel, but I thought it was loads of fun this time around.  No, it has nothing on the original, but the atmosphere was good and there's a lightness to some of it that works pretty well. Maybe the crowd helped a lot, but I could see myself rewatching this one every few years around Halloween.  Sadly, like the previous two films, we watched what is expected to be the last 35mm print of this one left.
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I'm in week three of my five-part breakdown of the "Gothic Hero-Villain" in horror movies of the last 50 years: https://bartcave.wordpress.com/2018/10/1...-part-iii/

Today I move into the 2000s with "j-horror" and "torture porn," if you're interested!
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Iron Maiden, it's awesome you went to that marathon, as it sounds like a blast; not to mention, a once in a lifetime opportunity to see some of those prints on the big screen. Vinegar Syndrome recently released Body Melt and I am sure they did a great job with it but I imagine it'd be amazing with a crowd, at least from what I know of the plot.

In the past week or so I saw some movies relevant to this thread. Food of the Gods is still a silly movie with some "wait a minute now" moments but I will say it is OK and the quaint effects are charming. The Swarm was a first time viewing; it was not the new Warner Archive Blu release but the 155 minute cut is available in SD for online streaming, which is what I did. No wonder this has such a toxic reputation. Much of it was unBEElievably bad but there are great moments of unintentional hilarity, especially the overwrought ending. As for what I saw on Saturday night... I better copy and past the whole spiel from elsewhere:

(I saw) 1981's Anyab, otherwise known in English as Fangs. You see, it is an Egyptian version of The Rocky Horror Picture Show. No kidding. The general idea is the same... a young couple breaks down by a mansion and once inside they see it's full of weird people. Here, the villains are vampires, led by Dracula! There's also a human hunchback, naturally. I thought it'd be bad but I enjoyed some of the humor and how there were some visual flourishes throughout. The movie is not as queer... I mean, Dracula is not a sweet transvestite from transsexual Transylvania, although I should probably say "overtly queer" as he still has DISCO PARTIES at the mansion nightly where some of his minions sport Ziggy Stardust-esque makeup and they dance about. Dracula wants this film's version of Janet but I will guess he swings the other way too.

For some reason, there is a twenty minute section in the film where things stop dead as this movie's version of the criminologist tells Dracula that vampires do exist in Egypt, and they are those damned capitalists... various sketches are done with the leads where you see that the average Egyptian is screwed over by such people as the greedy versions of plumbers, teachers, and taxi cab drivers; again, no kidding. It's all so weird and I can only gather that life in the country was pretty shitty at the time. I also can't explain why this section has most of the music that is covers of legendary themes. Now, most of the music you hear (including the musical numbers) are disco-tinged, which I found greatly amusing. There's also the James Bond theme and the themes from such films as The Pink Panther, Jaws, A Clockwork Orange, For a Few Dollars More, and for some reason, THE MUNSTERS. At least I wasn't bored by that stretch.

The movie itself, it's definitely bizarre but I'll say it's fine. I can't say it's poorly shot and the songs are pretty catchy. The director (Mohammed Shebl) was obviously a fan of the source material, along with such things as Hammer horror; in one scene, a vampire puts on a The Rocky Horror Picture Show shirt. It is actually on archive.org for anyone to see.
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Wrong thread.


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They Live inspired glasses that filter out screen-based advertising.

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