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The economy - oops
And liberal arts degrees means something to the people that got them. Chastising and guilting them for pursuing their interests doesn't solve anything.
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I don't know what Ovie is talking about. $5-$10K per year in loans? Man, I knew I wanted to be an architect at the time. I went to Syracuse, one of the top schools of architecture in the world. Its a 5-yr program. $10K in loans per year is laughable. And that was in 1992 dollars.
If you're happy, you're not paying attention.

Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny: 
Glad that you guys worked that out amongst yourselves.

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It's absurd. You can't find a state school that cheap these days.
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Liberal Arts should make anyone highly employable. It should be a real point of contention why employers would think someone is less worthy or qualified for having one over having rote learned some check box of things, unless we're talking about highly specialised and regulated fields.
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(05-05-2019, 06:09 PM)mike j Wrote:
(05-05-2019, 05:27 PM)Overlord Wrote: If you're taking out more than 5-10k a year in student loan debt, at most, and you aren't treating college as a vocational school for a very well thought out career path that you plan to work hard and excel in then you are making an enormous mistake.

And yeah, I've known waaaaaaaay too many folks in their 20s where I not only can't understand what they were thinking, I can't understand a system that allowed them to accumulate 100k+ in non-dischargeable student loan debt so they can obtain a liberal arts degree.

This is dumb. $5-10 grand a year in loans? What college is that cheap these days?

(05-05-2019, 08:11 PM)Neil Spurn Wrote: I don't know what Ovie is talking about.  $5-$10K per year in loans?  Man, I knew I wanted to be an architect at the time.  I went to Syracuse, one of the top schools of architecture in the world.  Its a 5-yr program.  $10K in loans per year is laughable.  And that was in 1992 dollars.


I didn't say "find a school that costs 5-10k a year."  I said "take out 10k a year in student loans."  Obviously, if the school costs more, you supplement that amount with either contributions from family (not something everyone is lucky enough to count on) or working (also not doable for some folks, although I will note that I worked 20-30 hours a week all through college and my first year of law school).

And I'll stand by my core premise that racking up 100k+ in student loan debt for unmarketable degrees is just setting a person up for a decade plus of misery.

**The exploding cost of tuition was entirely predictable when no caps were placed on what schools could charge students in exchange for federally guaranteed student loan dollars.

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Someone on Twitter had a good joke about how this poster looks like what a sunglasses-wearing Roddy Piper would see in They Live, and I can't disagree:

   
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(05-07-2019, 03:13 PM)Overlord Wrote:
(05-05-2019, 06:09 PM)mike j Wrote:
(05-05-2019, 05:27 PM)Overlord Wrote: If you're taking out more than 5-10k a year in student loan debt, at most, and you aren't treating college as a vocational school for a very well thought out career path that you plan to work hard and excel in then you are making an enormous mistake.

And yeah, I've known waaaaaaaay too many folks in their 20s where I not only can't understand what they were thinking, I can't understand a system that allowed them to accumulate 100k+ in non-dischargeable student loan debt so they can obtain a liberal arts degree.

This is dumb. $5-10 grand a year in loans? What college is that cheap these days?

(05-05-2019, 08:11 PM)Neil Spurn Wrote: I don't know what Ovie is talking about.  $5-$10K per year in loans?  Man, I knew I wanted to be an architect at the time.  I went to Syracuse, one of the top schools of architecture in the world.  Its a 5-yr program.  $10K in loans per year is laughable.  And that was in 1992 dollars.


I didn't say "find a school that costs 5-10k a year."  I said "take out 10k a year in student loans."  Obviously, if the school costs more, you supplement that amount with either contributions from family (not something everyone is lucky enough to count on) or working (also not doable for some folks, although I will note that I worked 20-30 hours a week all through college and my first year of law school).

And I'll stand by my core premise that racking up 100k+ in student loan debt for unmarketable degrees is just setting a person up for a decade plus of misery.

**The exploding cost of tuition was entirely predictable when no caps were placed on what schools could charge students in exchange for federally guaranteed student loan dollars.

But considering how competitive the job marked is and how stagnant wages are, what job can you work that's going to allow you to only take out 5-10K a year in loans?

I went to grad school with a guy who worked at Starbucks full-time. It was enough to offset his living expenses but he still had to take out a lot of loans to pay for school.

Whenever I see "This is what you should be doing, don't get an unmarketable degree!", it always comes from somebody older who didn't have a fraction of the tuition costs that people pay these days. I'm going to hazard a guess and say you got your law degree twenty years ago or at least close to it?

As for "unmarketable degrees", well, my Master's is in Film, which is about as "unmarketable" as it gets. Could I teach with it? Sure, but that's not why I enrolled. For the last two years, I've been working as a paid screenwriter. Those jobs have come from writing samples and referrals, the latter of which came from the connections I made at film school.

Hell, the first script I had optioned was by the chair of my department. It ultimately didn't sell, but it did get me a meeting with an executive.

Is debt fun? Of course not. But more often than not, pursuing a degree in the arts is more about building connections and a body of work, both of which are what ultimately pays off.
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The National Labor Relations Board has just released an opinion saying Uber employees are contractors - not legal employees - so they're not entitled to union membership, can't file complaints if Uber retaliates for organizing, etc.

https://news.bloomberglaw.com/daily-labo...top-lawyer

Quote:A group of Uber drivers aren’t legal “employees” for the purposes of federal labor laws, the federal labor board’s general counsel said in an opinion released May 14.

The National Labor Relations Board’s advice memo, dated April 16, means the agency will take the position that workers for companies such as Uber are excluded from federal protections for workplace organizing activities, like trying to form or join a union. In practice, that means Uber workers will have a much harder time trying to unionize or file what’s known as unfair labor practice charges with the federal government. 

The decision comes as Uber has struggled this week to meet expectations for its widely anticipated initial public offering. 

The Department of Labor has also previously concluded that so-called gig workers are independent contractors not entitled to minimum wages and overtime pay. 
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(05-14-2019, 02:19 PM)Iron Maiden Wrote: The National Labor Relations Board has just released an opinion saying Uber employees are contractors - not legal employees - so they're not entitled to union membership, can't file complaints if Uber retaliates for organizing, etc.

https://news.bloomberglaw.com/daily-labo...top-lawyer
Outlook 2018: Trump Appointees Usher in New Era at Labor Board
EVERYTHING
he
touches
DIES.

...or more specifically, all those under DJT are purposefully trying to KILL any and all federal bureaucracy that would benefit the average american. Calling them a 'death cult' is not hyperbolic.

How Trump's 'War' On The 'Deep State' Is Leading To The Dismantling Of Government

"Bannon framed much of Trump’s agenda with the phrase, “deconstruction of the administrative state,” meaning the system of taxes, regulations and trade pacts"
I used to be with "it", but then they changed what "it" was. Now, what I'm with isn't "it", and what's "it" seems weird and scary to me.   -Grandpa Simpson
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Baby boomers have somehow figured out a way to get affordable college twice now:

https://twitter.com/NBCNightlyNews/statu...1060630528
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Oftentimes in this job I get a chance to see the "generational divide" in terms of opportunities in the United States.

Probably going to take on as a client a family member who's part of a massive legal wrangling over a 97 year old WW2 veteran's estate. Guy owned a big apartment building in a fairly upscale part of L.A. Owned several detached homes, also in nice parts of L.A., and significant seven figure liquid assets have accumulated.

What did he do for a living?

He spent something like 50 years as a skycap at LAX. His wife was a stay-at-home mom.

This isn't that unique. I had a client five or six years ago who died with an 18 unit apartment building in Glendale, three homes in Pasadena, and a Newport Beach house. His "high powered" career to afford all this? He sold insurance door-to-door after WW2. Had a stay at home wife.

This is where the mindset of "I put myself through college, raised a wife and kids, had a nice big house, and we had two cars and two vacations every year and I afforded all this by working part-time at the local cat food plant" mentality comes from.

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My wife and I managed a 40+ unit apartment complex for one of those guys.
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A second boss of an Ohio metal plant has pleaded guilty to a criminal charge of trying to obstruct a federal investigation into workplace hazards that killed one worker and injured another:

https://news.bloomberglaw.com/safety/sec...bstruction

Quote:An Ohio aluminum plant safety coordinator pleaded guilty to a criminal charge of trying to obstruct a federal investigation into workplace hazards that killed one employee and injured another.

The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio Aug. 7 allowed Paul Love to change his plea from “not guilty” to “guilty.” Love admittedly tried to interfere with an Occupational Safety and Health Administration investigation at Extrudex Aluminum Inc.'s plant in North Jackson, Ohio.
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Chase Bank is forgiving all credit card debt for Canadian customers:

https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/201...964419001/

Quote:Canadians who had credit cards with Chase Bank could breathe a sigh of relief Thursday when the company announced it would "forgive" all outstanding debt.

Chase Bank, part of the New York based JPMorgan Chase & Co., closed all credit card accounts in the country in March 2018, Reuters and CBC reported.

Originally, customers were told to continue paying their debt, but the company said Thursday the debt was now cancelled, Reuters reported.

It wasn't immediately clear when the decision was made, but CBC spoke with some Canadians who said they received a letter from Chase this week.

"I was sort of over the moon all last night, with a smile on my face," Douglas Turner of Coe Hill, Ontario, told the Canadian broadcaster. Turner said he still owed more than $4,500 on his card. "I couldn't believe it."

The bank had offered two rewards cards – with Amazon and Marriott – in Canada but declined to say how much debt was forgiven or how many customers were affected, CBC reported. USA TODAY has reached out to Chase for comment.

"It's crazy," Turner added. "This stuff doesn't happen with credit cards. Credit cards are horror stories." The 55-year-old trucker also told CBC that his most recent payment on the account would also be reimbursed. 
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The bottom half of all U.S. households, as measured by wealth, have only recently regained the wealth lost in the 2007-2009 recession and still have 32% less wealth, adjusted for inflation, than in 2003:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/historic-as...1567157400
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(08-31-2019, 12:33 PM)Iron Maiden Wrote: The bottom half of all U.S. households, as measured by wealth, have only recently regained the wealth lost in the 2007-2009 recession and still have 32% less wealth, adjusted for inflation, than in 2003:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/historic-as...1567157400


Almost all of the gains from technological and multinational outsourcing over the past 3-4 decades have been appropriated by the upper 1% ... or maybe even the upper .1%.  

This corresponds almost exactly with the Buckley v. Valeo (and later, Citizens United) Supreme Court decisions.  The power to vote is nothing compared to the power to bribe.

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Raj Rajaratnam, the mastermind of one of the largest hedge-fund insider-trading rings in U.S. history, is out of prison almost two years early:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/...ight-years

Quote:Raj Rajaratnam, the mastermind of what prosecutors said was one of the largest hedge-fund insider-trading rings in U.S. history, is out of prison -- almost two years early.

Rajaratnam, whose Galleon Group LLC once managed more than $7 billion, is back with his family on a quiet block of Manhattan’s East Side, where he’s mostly confined to his apartment for the remainder of his sentence. He’s free to work outside his home during the day.

Sentenced to 11 years behind bars after his 2011 conviction, he served his time at the Federal Medical Center Devens, a prison outside Boston. Rajaratnam, 62, is a beneficiary of the 2018 First Step Act, which allows some federal inmates who are over 60 years old, or who face terminal illnesses, to serve the end of their sentences at home.


The native of Sri Lanka applied for home detention and was released this summer, according to a person familiar with the matter who asked not to be named. Rajaratnam reported to Devens in December 2011, becoming inmate number 62785-054.
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California lawmakers passed a bill that would let college athletes collect endorsement money:

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/09/sport...tw-nytimes
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Uber won’t comply with a new California law requiring contract workers to be reclassified as employees, saying drivers are not core to its business:

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/11/busin...&smtyp=cur

Uber Chief Legal Officer is questioning the reporting:

https://twitter.com/tonywest/status/1171891871632592896

Quote:This is completely wrong. @Uber will absolutely comply with the law—but the law does not “require contract workers to be reclassified as employees.” I made that clear on a call today with your reporters.
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Federal investigators are probing the conduct and practices of Mithril Capital, a venture capital firm co-founded by Peter Thiel:

https://www.vox.com/recode/2019/9/12/208...ajay-royan

Quote:US officials — including the FBI — have in recent months questioned some people close to Mithril regarding concerns of possible financial misconduct at the firm, according to people familiar with the matter who insisted on anonymity given its sensitivity. Mithril confirmed in a statement that its lawyers are in touch with government authorities.

Mithril’s leader, Ajay Royan, has worked with Thiel for almost two decades and has used that relationship to raise over $1 billion. But in recent years, Royan has frustrated some of his investors by sitting on some of their money rather than investing it in startups — while almost certainly raking in millions of dollars in fees for himself. 

This federal probe is just the latest — but most significant — problem for the firm, which has increasingly struggled with internal tensions, declining morale, and employee departures. Not all federal investigations, of course, end with an indictment, and Mithril could eventually be cleared of wrongdoing.
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Kickstarter has fired two union organizers in eight days, but is alleging that performances issues were the reasons:

https://slate.com/technology/2019/09/kic...izing.html

Quote:On Thursday morning, Kickstarter fired Taylor Moore, an employee who was one of the organizers of a unionization effort within the company. This was the second firing of a union organizer since last week, when Clarissa Redwine was also fired. Moore had been at the company for six years and Redwine since 2016, and both worked on the outreach team. Both had been heavily involved in the union effort since it began earlier this year. Moore and Redwine, according to four sources who work at the company, were both fired for what management alleged were performance-related issues. 

Kickstarter would not specifically comment on Moore’s and Redwine’s firings and said it has not fired anyone for union activities. On Monday evening, Redwine and the Office and Professional Employees International Union (through which Kickstarter employees are organizing) filed an unfair labor charge with the National Labor Relations Board, alleging that the severance agreement offered to her by Kickstarter contained an illegally phrased nondisparagement clause. Kickstarter told Slate it has not seen the filing and could not comment. 

The union effort became public in March. In May, CEO Aziz Hasan* told employees that the company would not voluntarily recognize the union if asked, but that it would respect the results of a secret staff vote. Multiple current and former employees told Slate that since March, the company has expressed to the staff that it does not believe a union is right for Kickstarter. 

If a union within the company is formed, Kickstarter will be the most prominent technology company with a unionized workforce. 
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Millions of small donor dollars raised by networks of scam PACs and nonprofits under the guise of helping leukemia-stricken kids, breast cancer survivors, military vets and more was funneled into the coffers of one man’s companies:

https://publicintegrity.org/federal-poli...ributions/

Quote:But virtually none of his money helped children with leukemia or their parents, who often face crippling medical expenses and crushing anxiety.  

About $84 of Thomas’ contribution landed with a network of companies run by a Las Vegas-based businessman, Richard Zeitlin. 

The remainder? Almost all of it funded Children’s Leukemia Support Network salaries, bank fees, payroll taxes and other overhead expenses.

“I feel cheated,” Thomas said in a recent interview at a cancer treatment center in Tampa. “Misused.”

Thomas is one of thousands of Americans who’ve opened their wallets to groups that sound like charities but actually are political action committees. The groups raise money in the name of leukemia-stricken children, breast cancer survivors, police officers, firefighters and struggling military veterans, among others. Little if any of the money donors provide goes toward the causes being championed. 
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A little about the UAW strike:

https://news.yahoo.com/talks-carry-no-de...QRzZWMDc3I-

Quote:Contract talks between General Motors and the United Auto Workers were set to resume Tuesday as a strike by more than 49,000 employees extended into a second day.

Negotiators took a break from bargaining around 9 p.m. Monday but were to be back at the tables on Tuesday.

"They are talking, they've made progress, we'll see how long it takes," Brian Rothenberg, spokesman for the UAW, said Tuesday.

The walkout has brought to a standstill more than 50 factories and parts warehouses in the union's first strike against the No. 1 U.S. automaker in over a decade.

Workers left factories and formed picket lines shortly after midnight Monday in the dispute over a new four-year contract. The union's top negotiator said in a letter to the company that the strike could have been averted had the company made its latest offer sooner.

The letter dated Sunday suggests that the company and union are not as far apart as the rhetoric leading up to the strike had indicated.

Company-paid health insurance for the workers ended on Monday, but the UAW's strike fund will pick up premiums for medical expenses and prescriptions, according to the union website.

Asked about the possibility of federal mediation, President Donald Trump said it's possible if the company and union want it.
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