Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Confessions of a Shield Virgin
I revisited the series a few years ago. Aside from the flip phones and the plot thread about vaccines causing autism, it holds up pretty well.
Reply
Wasn't the "vaccines cause autism" view seen as an obvious ploy for Mackey and his wife to join in on some huckster lawyer's class action lawsuit?
Reply
I always read it as Vic, but especially Corrine willing to believe any explanation for their kids’ autism. I never got the impression that the show was actually pushing the anti-vax angle.

I hope the show gets revived. Politics have changed so much in ten years that it seems to me that the writers could give Vic a very fresh and contemporary story.
Reply
The Shield is the only show where I've written fanfic in my head that reunites the surviving (and not incarcerated IRL) characters for new adventures in Farmington.
Reply
(07-29-2018, 07:33 PM)bradito Wrote: The Shield is the only show where I've written fanfic in my head that reunites the surviving (and not incarcerated IRL) characters for new adventures in Farmington.

Ronnie never actually does any prison time.  Vic hires a clever lawyer for him that points out to the brass that if Ronnie goes down, literally hundreds, if not thousands, of tainted arrests will be overturned and a massive release of prisoners and a crime wave would result.

Vic and Ronnie later team up with disgraced CTU agent Jack Bauer to tackle the latest WMD related super-threat.
Reply
Mine was more along the lines of the Barn reinstating Mackey because crime in Farmington has skyrocketed since his departure. But it's ultimately a trap, set by mayoral candidate Aceveda, who knows Mackey will get up to his old tricks again, and he simultaneously wants to reduce crime stats while finally landing Mackey in a cell for the rest of his life.

Dutch would be captain.
Reply
I can't see Dutch as Captain. He would hate all the admin and being stuck behind a desk.

Billings, on the other hand...
"I don't do tag-teams with blood relatives". Kenny Powers.
Reply
I implied this above, but I can’t see a reboot of the show being successful if everything is reset and Vic is back to his old job at the Barn. A follow-up would have to acknowledge how the emergence of Black Lives Matter would derail the ambitions of a politican with Acevada’s history, and now it would also have to address ICE. So I suppose my fanfic would see a beaten down Vic seizing the current political climate to his advantage.
Reply
(07-30-2018, 12:40 PM)Giorgio Wrote: now it would also have to address ICE. So I suppose my fanfic would see a beaten down Vic seizing the current political climate to his advantage.

I imagine Vic Mackey would have some interesting opinions re: ICE and family separation.
Reply
This show is perfect as is. No need to revive.
AIt's just tits and dragons. - Ian McShane on Game of Thones
Reply
I'm more and more keen on a revival. It seems as if The Shield was unjustly forgotten. Plus, I don’t think the show is perfect. It was early enough in the era of prestige TV that it still has some of the annoying ticks of network shows. I’m thinking especially of how it began to string it’s secondary characters along as it evolved from ensemble cop show to novelistic cable drama. A new season could work out some of these kinks and would be absolute dynamite in this political climate. I’d go so far as to say Shawn Ryan is a fool if he isn’t pitching an ICE-themed eighth season to FX this very moment.
Reply
It ended so strong that I don't believe we need it revived. But yeah I'd sure as hell watch if they did.
Reply
How can a new season work? Vic can't be a cop and the rest of the strike team are* dead or in jail? Vic as a private eye?

There is a reason the saying "You can't go home again" rings true.

*grammar
AIt's just tits and dragons. - Ian McShane on Game of Thones
Reply
Yeah, it's not like the show was cut down in its prime. It went out on its own terms, with arguably the strongest conclusion of any show ever. Leave well enough alone.
Reply
I need moar.
Reply
This show isn't getting any kind of revival. I think Shawn Ryan, Chicklis, and the rest of the main players realize it would be silly to bring it back when it ended so perfectly.
Reply
Get Ryan and Chiklis to bring back The Commish.
Reply
I'm not sure why The Shield has been largely forgotten/marginalized. Maybe it's the intentionally low-budget looking presentation?

When I think of the great anti-heroes of television, Mackey is up there with Walter White and Tony Soprano. The Shield is from top to bottom an absolute triumph (except that basketball episode near the beginning of season one) and I'm not sure why it hasn't been consistently ranked up there with The Wire, Breaking Bad, et al. as seminal television.

It's also fairly rare in that it not only went out on top, BUT it also nailed an open-ended, yet satisfying ending. It's simply a triumph of plotting. I was on the edge of my couch for like three straight seasons.

I like Bradito's idea for a reboot.
Reply
The Shield ended perfectly, though I can't deny I'd be interested to know what happens next. As the final shot suggests, Mackey's not the type of person to just sit by while he's getting screwed. He'd totally get blackmail someone or figure out some other way to get himself reinstated while his enemies stare in disbelief.
I might have been born yesterday sir, but I stayed up all night!
Reply
I liked the basketball episode! Are we not allowed to enjoy it now because of Trump?
"I don't do tag-teams with blood relatives". Kenny Powers.
Reply
If you have to do a follow up, which I maintain that you absolutely do not have to do, here is the one and only acceptable route:

Two movies, or at most a miniseries in two acts, focusing heavily on how Vic adjusts (or doesn't) to the very different climate of today.  Start with how ICE in the Trump era has gotten so far off the leash that it is now a place where Vic can flourish and even be celebrated.  But even he gets disgusted by the rampant abuse of immigrants and especially the separation of children from their parents.  This combines with his pent up feelings about the gig being exile from real police work, so he finagles a reverse of his exit from Farmington.  He does something that makes him a media darling - say, exposing especially heinous cases of child abuse and/or reuniting some family on his own - but sells out his superiors and tarnishes the agency in the process.  So he writes his ticket back to Farmington, feeling like he has really done some good in the world, and maybe even we do too, having seen that he is capable of fighting corruption as well as fostering it. 


Act Two is his return to Farmington.  This is the first place we see anyone else from the original series.  Claudette is dead, Danny is being groomed by Mayor Aceveda to be the next Commissioner, Dutch wrote a book about serial killers and now spends his time guesting on Nancy Grace and consulting on a CSI clone where he is frustrated that the showrunner routinely ignores his detailed treatises on intricate detective work in favor of glorifying the crowd-pleasing heroics of the SWAT team*.  Vic is at first welcomed as a hero by an overwhelmed Captain Billings and a younger generation impressed enough by his recent good press to dismiss the rumors about the dark circumstances of his first exit as fake news.  It's his entire dream of the last decade come true.  

Except that policing is very different now, with cellphone and body cams and Black Lives Matter (potentially infiltrated by a paroled Antwan Mitchell) rendering the Strike Team's old tactics completely untenable.  And Vic's stubborn adherence to the old ways quickly complicate the social media mob's, and by extension the audience's, ability to place him squarely in a hero/villain box.  This creates problems for Aceveda's run for a Senate on an anti-corruption campaign, wherein he flirts with the ideas of both using Vic as a prop/cudgel against ICE and trying to expose him and turn him into an effigy to burn.  This leads Vic to sidle up to his slimy opponent and tell him about the sexual assault.  Meanwhile Dutch's frustration in his semi-gilded cage, and probably looking to regain some mojo after being humiliated by fellow news-celeb Vic on a joint TV appearance, leads him to dig in on a high profile cold case file (a Golden State Killer analogue?) with the assistance of a comely True Crime podcaster.  When they find a lead with ties to an old Strike Team case, she wants to switch the focus from the serial killer to unearthing this long-buried scandal within the LAPD.   Is he willing to expose Mackey and the department's corruption, if it means letting the killer go free?  Will Danny sacrifice her own career ambitions to help him do so, or convince herself that she can enact change from the top later on, while keeping the sins of the past buried?  Will Aceveda's somewhat cynical, Spacey-esque attempt to ride the #MeToo wave be successful?  Will Vic finally face actual justice for his crimes?


(Spoiler alert: Not really.  He will face Twitter justice, which will be enough to make his name mud and once again drum him out of the LAPD.  But he will receive a presidential pardon on his way out a la' Joe Arpaio, and his bad reputation will only endear him to the sleazebag TV producer, who will bring him on to fill Dutch's consultant role on the SWAT-centric spinoff, and also be his behind-the-scenes fixer for all his own sex scandals/coke deals/extortion attempts)

 



*note to Shawn Ryan and staff: there is going to be a huge temptation to get overly cute with meta-commentary on the show's original reception and the current state of police dramas.  I know that restraint was never a hallmark of the show's writing style, but try to resist this.
Reply
Amazon currently has the blu-ray set at $118.29 pre-order price.
The most important thing in life is broads. Broads!
Reply
Tempted, but I'm still gonna hold out for someone marking it under $100 around Black Friday.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)