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Welcome To Twin Peaks
#36
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Originally Posted by Jakespeare
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Computer screen is all I gots unfortunately.

Jakespeare, if you're watching the series on a computer screen, you will never in a bill-trillion years expreince the series. You'll think you have experienced the series, but you'll be *cough* cheated.

It's such a sadness. That you think you've seen a series on your FUCKING COMPUTER SCREEN.

(my apologies if you don't get the reference.)
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#37
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Originally Posted by Syd
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Jakespeare, if you're watching the series on a computer screen, you will never in a bill-trillion years expreince the series. You'll think you have experienced the series, but you'll be *cough* cheated.

It's such a sadness. That you think you've seen a series on your FUCKING COMPUTER SCREEN.

(my apologies if you don't get the reference.)

Yeah, I'm blanking. Sorry.
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#38
Lazy bastards.
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#39
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Originally Posted by Syd
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The show's great, but in my opinion kicks it up a notch when Miguel Ferrer enters the picture. He's fucking great, and a nice foil to Agent Cooper's optimism as well as just being plain nasty to every single Twin Peaks resident.

Also?

"Albert Rosenfield. A-L-B-E-R-T R-O-S-E-N-F-I-E-L-D."

*sticks tongue out*

Pity this brilliant entrance of a charactor only lasted about 5 episodes, and then he started to become conscious of his female side...WHAT???!
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#40
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Originally Posted by Phil
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There's a recording studio in 'The Black Lodge'?
Should'nt Lynch of been talking backwards?
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#41
...The Owls are NOT what they Seem...
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#42
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Originally Posted by Phil
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Aha. I probably should've caught that.
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#43
Twin Peaks, Season One: Episode One

This episode was more and less than I was expecting.

More, because we get Bob's beyond-creepy introduction to the show, and less, because the soapy aspects of this show are reallllllllllly soapy. Like, "One Life To Live" soapy.

Random thoughts:

1) Bob!

2) Yup. It's all about the sound with this show. Bad enough that Mrs. Palmer, mid-hug, catches a leering Bob staring up at her like some malevolent cancer invading her home. It's the music - a droning, Eastern-sounding, holy/unholy noise - that rockets the first glimpse of the show's Face Of Evil from creepy to terrifying.

3) This is some soapy stuff. Donna's confession to her mother, and Ben Horne's confrontation with Audrey, manage to have both the overwrought language of my grandmother's 'stories' and their awkward sense of timing, acting-wise. I found myself unsure as to whether the awkwardness was calculated. Are Lynch, Frost and the cast commenting on soap operas at this point? Or are they unabashedly making one without irony? It's difficult to tell.

4) The whole coffee and pie thing gets a lot of play in this episode. It comes right up to the edge of being too repetitious, but steers away in time. Nance's "fish in the percolator" bit helps, as does the throwaway comment "I can still taste the fish in the coffee" later in the episode.

5) The show's doing a good job of providing possible murder suspects all over the place. I have no idea whether Lynch and Frost knew going in who would end up being the killer - whether or not they ever planned to reveal it - but at this point there are a whole lotta suspects.

6) Leo, while younger than remembered, is also more brutal than remembered. When he slips the soap into the sock at the sink (hooray for alliteration!) its a moment that, nowadays, might be cut away from immediately. Not in Twin Peaks. We get to watch the wind up, the cowering of Shelly in the corner.....and that THWAP sound right after the screen goes black feels a lot like Lynch giving me the finger. It's rightly horrifying.

7) Let's discuss violence against women. So far, we have a murdered prom queen, a second, mentally and physically violated female victim, a classic domestic abuse case of a housewife, a threatened daughter....and we're just finished with ep. 1. Having seen some of Lynch's work post-Peaks, I'm familiar with his fondness for putting women in horrible situations. But they feel extra-highlighted to me in this show. Is Lynch using femininity destroyed/degraded as a way of commenting on the corruption that seems to be a grand theme of the show? Is he engaging in a long, inglorious tradition of women-in-peril for more mundane reasons? Because it suits the story?

8) Hey! It's Scully's Dad! The cigarette in the meatloaf was a nice touch.

9) What is the Great Northern, exactly? It seems like the sort of rustic luxury hotel you'd find in Yellowstone, not on the edge of a logging town in Washington. And what exactly were the businessmen doing there that Horne was so upset about them leaving? Something about contracts? I remember them from the pilot, and I remember them leaving in a huff, but that's about it.

10) No giggly German waitress in this one.

11) We hear/see Laura twice in this episode: Once, as James is remembering how he got his half of the locket, and once at the end of the episode, where Hawaii Doc listens to creepily-private sounding tapes of Laura talking to him, and where its revealed that somehow, he's got a half of the heart necklace (in a coconut, no less).

Dramatically speaking, her first appearance, which is visual as well as auditory, serves to shore up our impression of Laura as a slightly-off, sweet girl. There's again a seriously soapish quality to the moment between her and James, but that quality is undercut by a strange flatness in her eyes.

Her second appearance, in which we hear but do not see her, is more revealing - as if by stripping away her image, we're getting closer to the truth of what she is/was. We hear that she loves James' sweetness, but that he's so very dull - and that she knows 'she'll get lost in those woods again tonight." It's a sad, eerie moment. Self-destructive people often seem to be aware of both their capacity for self-harm, and their inability to do anything about it.

As of now, I'm assuming that the mystery man she speaks about is Bob - which means that the woods are likely as much figurative as they are literal.

And with that - Hawaii Doc laying back in a chair surrounded by Hawaiian kitsch, listening to Laura's private dark confessions - the episode ends.

Loved the sense of encroaching darkness. Remain unmoved by possibly faux soap tone. Looking forward to ep. 2.
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#44
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Originally Posted by Jesse Custer
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3) This is some soapy stuff. Donna's confession to her mother, and Ben Horne's confrontation with Audrey, manage to have both the overwrought language of my grandmother's 'stories' and their awkward sense of timing, acting-wise. I found myself unsure as to whether the awkwardness was calculated. Are Lynch, Frost and the cast commenting on soap operas at this point? Or are they unabashedly making one without irony? It's difficult to tell.

I think the inclusion of the cutaways to "Invitation to Love" (not sure if you've gotten those yet) indicate that it's the former, at least primarily.

Quote:

7) Let's discuss violence against women. So far, we have a murdered prom queen, a second, mentally and physically violated female victim, a classic domestic abuse case of a housewife, a threatened daughter....and we're just finished with ep. 1. Having seen some of Lynch's work post-Peaks, I'm familiar with his fondness for putting women in horrible situations. But they feel extra-highlighted to me in this show. Is Lynch using femininity destroyed/degraded as a way of commenting on the corruption that seems to be a grand theme of the show? Is he engaging in a long, inglorious tradition of women-in-peril for more mundane reasons? Because it suits the story?

In the early goings, I think it's easy to view the abuse/women-in-peril situations through the soapy lens that, as viewers, we're used to. But as the series goes on, and the violence gets more disturbing and more brutal, I think the show almost becomes accusatory towards the viewer. "Hey, this is the stuff that you want to watch, right?" Fire Walk With Me takes this to very uncomfortable extremes.
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#45
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Originally Posted by Matt M
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I think the inclusion of the cutaways to "Invitation to Love" (not sure if you've gotten those yet) indicate that it's the former, at least primarily.

No idea what you're talking about, so I'm assuming that I haven't gotten those yet. Glad to hear there's a meta-element to it, though. It'll make it easier to watch in a not-quite-explainable kind of way.

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Originally Posted by Matt M
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In the early goings, I think it's easy to view the abuse/women-in-peril situations through the soapy lens that, as viewers, we're used to. But as the series goes on, and the violence gets more disturbing and more brutal, I think the show almost becomes accusatory towards the viewer. "Hey, this is the stuff that you want to watch, right?" Fire Walk With Me takes this to very uncomfortable extremes.

What's interesting about your comment (from my perspective): That soapy lens you're talking about already feels as if its disintegrating. The discovery of Laura's body, while rife with overwrought emotional moments from pretty much every cast member, was still shot through with an almost voyeuristic naturalness. Andy's crying at the scene, and Laura's parents' total breakdowns, were uncomfortable in their immediacy. Subsequent violence (the woman in her nightgown walking, shivering, down the tracks, and Shelly's fetal pleading) only augmented that sense of peeking in on something terrible.

If, as you say, the violence becomes more pronounced, I'm going to have a difficult time with it. As I've already brought up in the Funny Games remake thread, I'm not the kind of person who seeks out violence as entertainment. Any accusatory element is likely to make me feel extremely uncomfortable, in the same way that Haneke's finger-pointing did.

Of course, that's arguably the point - even if I don't consider myself to be someone drawn to bloodshed. I'm still watching, after all.
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#46
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Originally Posted by Jesse Custer
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What's interesting about your comment (from my perspective): That soapy lens you're talking about already feels as if its disintegrating. The discovery of Laura's body, while rife with overwrought emotional moments from pretty much every cast member, was still shot through with an almost voyeuristic naturalness. Andy's crying at the scene, and Laura's parents' total breakdowns, were uncomfortable in their immediacy.

You're absolutely right. For me, you could boil it down to one scene in the pilot: Leland and Sarah simultaneously realizing that Laura's dead over the phone. It's soapy, then it's uncomfortably soapy, then it's really and truly sad, and then, with Sarah's piercing shriek, the scene ends on a moment of pure horror.

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If, as you say, the violence becomes more pronounced, I'm going to have a difficult time with it.

I don't want to oversell this, as I don't think the violence gets systematically worse (Shelly getting beaten with the soap is still among the worst moments). But there's a crucial murder in season 2* that's one of the most terrifying things Lynch has ever shot. It's almost unfathomable that it was allowed on network TV.

*If you watched the series all the way through, you'll probably remember the one I mean, but I won't spoil it, just in case. Except to say that, sadly, it's not James Hurley getting beaten to death.
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#47
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Originally Posted by Matt M
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You're absolutely right. For me, you could boil it down to one scene in the pilot: Leland and Sarah simultaneously realizing that Laura's dead over the phone. It's soapy, then it's uncomfortably soapy, then it's really and truly sad, and then, with Sarah's piercing shriek, the scene ends on a moment of pure horror.

That sums it up perfectly. It's as though they're pushing straight through the melodrama - stretching and breaking it - in search of something rawer and more visceral. There's nothing 'classy' about that acting. It doesn't have the refined, painterly quality of Oscar-worthy weep-fests, and it doesn't remain in the realm of over-the-top B-movie chest beating. It goes past that point, and ends up horrifically close to actual emotional agony.

Not to rhapsodize about it excessively - it's not like looking into the eye of God or anything. But it gets under the skin in a way that feels very, very real.

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Originally Posted by Matt M
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But there's a crucial murder in season 2* that's one of the most terrifying things Lynch has ever shot. It's almost unfathomable that it was allowed on network TV.

*If you watched the series all the way through, you'll probably remember the one I mean, but I won't spoil it, just in case. Except to say that, sadly, it's not James Hurley getting beaten to death.

I do not, in fact, remember what you're talking about. And I'm both glad and apprehensive about it now. And sorry it's not James. Though, in James' defense, he has a moment in the first episode with Donna, where her parents leave for a moment, that's ridiculously charming in its open innocence (Something along the lines of "I'm really glad to see you," followed by the sort of smile that's utterly emotionally unguarded). Not much of an actor, perhaps, but he has an innate childlike quality there that makes me think it's the reason Lynch hired him.
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#48
I think James is used very well in the first season, making the actor's liabilities a crucial part of his character. When they try to push him 'dark,' it's among the worst character arcs in TV history.

Out of curiosity, do you remember who the killer is? Or should we tiptoe around that?
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#49
The second season murder you're all speaking of is one of the most, if not the most brutal things I've seen, TV or no.

I was absolutely in shock (and still am) that it was every aired on TV.

They really dump it all on you in that episode, and though extremely disturbing and terrifying, it's quite amazing as well.
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#50
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Originally Posted by Matt M
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I think James is used very well in the first season, making the actor's liabilities a crucial part of his character. When they try to push him 'dark,' it's among the worst character arcs in TV history.

Out of curiosity, do you remember who the killer is? Or should we tiptoe around that?

They make him "dark"? I'm already dreading that.

And yes, I do remember who Laura's killer is, though for the sake of anyone reading along with us for the first time, I'm purposefully not saying their name. I'm attempting to let this re-watching be as 'pure' as possible, so I've avoided reading up on what happens when and to who, and any comments I'm making will hopefully not spoil anything for folks like Jakespeare. If you all could do me the favor of not dropping any mega-spoilers regarding the main plotline it would be much appreciated.

Given that the show's as old as it is though, and that you might not want to play by those rules, I'm not expecting anyone to feel bad if they let something slip. That said, I'm enjoying reading the comments here as much as I'm enjoying revisiting the show.

ETA:

Oh, and I forgot to mention the Log Lady, who makes her first appearance in the first episode.

I'd forgotten all about her. I love that her log 'saw something that night,' and that Cooper is required to ask the log what it saw.

I'm wondering now whether her character is weird for weirdness' sake, or if she and her lil' wooden friend are representative of something.
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#51
There is more to her and her log, but it's left somewhat mysterious and really only hinted at through other characters.

For whatever reason, I can't remember if she played a part in the film. I want to say she did, but maybe I'm just thinking of the last few episodes. I just remember at some point they allude to what her deal is, so to speak.

I'll say this: she has something in common with a few other characters that gets touched on towards the end.
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#52
My favorite line, delivered in over the top evil scheming cheezy-ness by my favorite cigar chomping villain, Benjamin Horne:

"You just leave the creative thinking to the brothers Horne. You're a bicep; wait until we say flex."

Also, another moment I love: when a character (I won't say who) gets shot, they slump down on their couch, and their eyes wander to the T.V., which is playing the soap opera "Invitation to Love". A character on THAT show has just gotten shot, and dies in an overly dramatic, cheezy fashion. The dying character watching this gets this priceless look on his face like "Hey...that's now how it happens..."
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#53
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Originally Posted by joeypants
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There is more to her and her log, but it's left somewhat mysterious and really only hinted at through other characters.

For whatever reason, I can't remember if she played a part in the film. I want to say she did, but maybe I'm just thinking of the last few episodes. I just remember at some point they allude to what her deal is, so to speak.

I'll say this: she has something in common with a few other characters that gets touched on towards the end.

For the record, episode 1 isn't her first appearance. She's in the pilot episode as well, at the town meeting where Cooper is introduced.

Cooper: "Who's the lady with the log?"
Truman: "We call her the Log Lady."
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#54
Man, all this Twin Peaks talk is giving me a Gold Box itch. I know where any Christmas gift cards/$$$ are going.
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#55
That's right - Truman does point out the log lady in the town meeting. Good recall on that.

I'm liking the notion that Peaks is commenting on the conventions of melodrama. The examples you all have given seem to give a lot of credence to that view.

Meant to spin ep. 2 last night, but ended up getting drunk with a buddy instead.

Matt, the Gold Box is worth it for the sheer time-travel nostalgia alone (not to mention the opportunity to walk through the series with a knowledgable crew like all of you). Highly recommended. I'm saving the extras for last (minus the SNL sketches, which I felt compelled to watch immediately), and there are a number of them - including a 35 minute interview between MacLachlan, Amick, and Lynch that I'm excited to watch when I finish the series.

On a tangential note - the score for the show has been floating in my head all week - alternating between the dreamy theme and the acid jazz bass-walk number. I loved that when Ben Horne walks in on Audrey in ep 1, she's just standing there, grooving to the trippy bass lines, and we see Horne go to the radio and shut it off - implying that the teenagers in Twin Peaks all listen to avant-garde freakout jazz for their kooky dance parties.
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#56
Quote:

On a tangential note - the score for the show has been floating in my head all week - alternating between the dreamy theme and the acid jazz bass-walk number. I loved that when Ben Horne walks in on Audrey in ep 1, she's just standing there, grooving to the trippy bass lines, and we see Horne go to the radio and shut it off - implying that the teenagers in Twin Peaks all listen to avant-garde freakout jazz for their kooky dance parties.

Angelo Badalamenti is the absolute bomb. His jazzy, trippy, surreal scores and ability to skip among various genres make it worthwhile to pick up any Lynch soundtrack. From "Fire Walk with Me" to, especially, "Lost Highway", it's always a fascinating listen.
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#57
Is Bob still the scariest motherfucker in the world?
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#58
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Originally Posted by BobClark
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Is Bob still the scariest motherfucker in the world?

You tell me.
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#59
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Originally Posted by BobClark
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Is Bob still the scariest motherfucker in the world?

YES.

ETA:

Mattioli - Why, man? Why'd you have to do it?
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#60
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Originally Posted by Jesse Custer
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On a tangential note - the score for the show has been floating in my head all week - alternating between the dreamy theme and the acid jazz bass-walk number.

Any self-respecting Twin Peaks fan should own both Badalamenti's soundtrack and Julee Cruise's Floating Into the Night, music by Badalamenti and lyrics by Lynch.
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#61
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Originally Posted by Jesse Custer
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[B]Mattioli - Why, man? Why'd you have to do it?

For the same reason, I bring you this: Happy Christmas Bunnies!!! No really, I promise.
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#62
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Originally Posted by Mattioli
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You tell me.

Fairly well-known story, but here's how that shot happened:

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Question: How did you become BOB on Twin Peaks?

Frank Silva: It was an accident. I was hired as the the on-set dresser for the pilot, we were shooting in Everett, Washington where the Palmer house was and we were shooting the interiors, and exteriors, and we were shooting in Laura Palmer's bedroom. It was basically the scene in the pilot where previous to the scene where we see her Mother downstairs yelling for her. Basically the shot we were getting ready to do, was Lauras's mother's POV of her daughter's room after her wanting her to come down to breakfast. So, the camera was in the doorway, David was out in the hall, where the ceiling fan is. I was tweaking the bedroom set, getting everything ready to go, making sure everything is in it's place. David jokingly said, Frank, you better get out of there, you're going to get caught in the camera. And then suddenly he said - wait a minute!! Frank, get down to the base of the bed, crouch down, look through those wrought iron bars, and act scared! And then they shot the POV, with me at the base of the bed. And it just sort of snowballed from there.

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#63
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Originally Posted by Matt M
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Any self-respecting Twin Peaks fan should own both Badalamenti's soundtrack and Julee Cruise's Floating Into the Night, music by Badalamenti and lyrics by Lynch.

In 1990, there was no soundtrack to buy, so I would be driving around listening to that Julee Cruise tape.

Interested in revisiting; is there a Blu-Ray version coming?
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#64
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Originally Posted by Mattioli
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For the same reason, I bring you this: Happy Christmas Bunnies!!! No really, I promise.

Stupid enough to click it, fast enough to get the hell out as soon as I saw the title.

I have an ongoing "one walking nightmare a day" policy, and viewing that would clearly violate it.
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#65
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Originally Posted by BobClark
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Is Bob still the scariest motherfucker in the world?

Hell yeah. That is exactly the reason I put him as number three on the CHUD TV All-stars list. Last time I revisited the first season he still scared the shit out of me. I was one of those poor souls that bought the season one set. And then left out in the cold waiting years for the release of the second season. When it came finally around the gold box was the plain better and cheaper deal. Unfortunately I can´t afford neither of those right now.

But I´ll try to catch up with you Jesse cause I love me some Twin Peaks.

And the Soundtrack is pure gold. I am still listening to these enchanting tunes after all these years.
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#66
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Originally Posted by Phil
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In 1990, there was no soundtrack to buy, so I would be driving around listening to that Julee Cruise tape.

Interested in revisiting; is there a Blu-Ray version coming?

I bought her tape also. Damn, I'm old.

No Blu-ray of the series announced yet. You will be able to get the first season though, apparently.

If you've got Netflix/Blockbuster online, you can rent the Gold Box through them. Order them up and hop on board - it's been a blast thus far.
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#67
Benjamin Horne is one of my absolute favorite characters, EVER.

Right from that first moment when he spits in the fire, the deal was done. I nearly pissed myself from laughter at that one little moment.

Other favorites:
-The bread + butter sandwich and his reaction/enjoyment of the whole thing.
-Civil War (supervised by Jacobi)
-His dancing on the desk for Leland's song

What an awesome, awesome character.
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#68
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Originally Posted by Mattioli
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You tell me.

Good lord, it's Frank Miller.
Terrifying.
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#69
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Originally Posted by BobClark
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Good lord, it's Frank Miller.
Terrifying.

Heh.

On a somber note, RIP Frank Silva.
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#70
Bob had the AIDS?? Damn.
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