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Welcome To Twin Peaks
#71
Didn't know that as well.

What did you guys think of Fire Walk With Me? I remember Chris Issac and a pre-24 Kiefer Sutherland in it.
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#72
Didn't Bowie play the Log Lady in the film?
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#73
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Originally Posted by felix natalya
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What did you guys think of Fire Walk With Me? I remember Chris Issac and a pre-24 Kiefer Sutherland in it.

I think it's aged very well. Removed from the context of fans realizing that it was the last look they'd get at the town (and subsequently being let down by the lack of quirky townsfolk), it's a seriously creepy sexual abuse drama.

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Originally Posted by Phil
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Didn't Bowie play the Log Lady in the film?

Bowie was Agent Philip Jeffries. And he's not gonna talk about Judy.
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#74
I thought the Heather Graham cameo in Fire Walks was a nice touch. Plus the last imagery of Cooper and Laura together. Haunting and nice.

I doubt we'll ever see the deleted footage though. Despite what Lynch says.
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#75
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Originally Posted by felix natalya
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I thought the Heather Graham cameo in Fire Walks was a nice touch. Plus the last imagery of Cooper and Laura together. Haunting and nice.

I doubt we'll ever see the deleted footage though. Despite what Lynch says.

...or find out how he did the baby in Eraserhead, but that's probably for the best.
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#76
I STILL find Audrey Horne's 'audition' at 'One-Eyed Jack's' one of the sexiest pieces of TV EVER!

...yeah, the cherry...
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#77
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Originally Posted by Jesse Custer
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5) The show's doing a good job of providing possible murder suspects all over the place. I have no idea whether Lynch and Frost knew going in who would end up being the killer - whether or not they ever planned to reveal it - but at this point there are a whole lotta suspects.

Dr. Jacoby, Benjamin Horne and Leo Johnson I remember were the most obvious to me. (Leo being so obvious that he just HAD to be a red herring.) Dr. Jacoby was an obsessive freak (his scene with Bobby especially) and Benjamin Horne is just full on cigar-chomping scuzziness. Then I had to look at the LEAST obvious suspects, those who appeared the most innocent. Josie Packard especially.

What I love about the show is that, even though only one person is guilty of killing Laura Palmer, the town is full of terrible terrible people.
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#78
I got the Gold Box set through DD's 25% off sale, and am anticipating watching it again over the holidays. I've had the entire series on vhs thanks to Hollywood Video liquidating it's vhs stock, but I'm glad that I finally have it on dvd.
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#79
If only the series ended with the resolving of Luara Palmer's murder in Season 2. All that Windom Earle stuff after that was weak.

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I STILL find Audrey Horne's 'audition' at 'One-Eyed Jack's' one of the sexiest pieces of TV EVER!

I so agree with that. In fact, Sherilyn Fenn was offered her own spin-off Audrey series but she refused.
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#80
On the original DVD of Fire Walk With Me, some well-intentioned sound engineer equalized the audio for the roadhouse scene, making the dialogue clearly audible and rendering the subtitles pointless. I hope that's been fixed since.

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Originally Posted by Jesse Custer
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7) I can sort of see how Season Two is going to derail (correct me if I'm wrong). There's an impressive balancing act here between whimsy, melodrama, and eerieness that could easily go awry.

As noted above, the TV-show-within-the-show was essential to maintaining that balance, reminding us the viewers that we were, after all, watching a nighttime soap. Its absence from Season 2 was unfortunate.

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Methinks the show will tip way too far into quirky small-town melodrama (that eye-patch lady already looks like a future offender),

You are correct, sir.

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9) Lara Flynn Boyle had a personality? And warmth? Why didn't anyone tell me? The Lara Flynn Boyle I know is a cold mannequin of a woman, prone to icy-bitch roles and (probably) eating the hearts of children to stay young.

Another casualty of Season 2...
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#81
Just finished the pilot (finally, I had to wait for Netflix after I discovered the copy I was watching was only the first half.

If I don't finish the whole first season tonight it'll show remarkable restraint on my part. I'm really liking this.

"Are you going to do this at every crime scene Andy?"

EDIT: I'm a sucker for Donna and James. I didn't know Lara Flynn Boyle was ever interesting.
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#82
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Originally Posted by Hammerhead
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As noted above, the TV-show-within-the-show was essential to maintaining that balance, reminding us the viewers that we were, after all, watching a nighttime soap.

Shit, I forgot about that! Why is THAT the tipping point that's going to make me rewatch Twin Peaks? I wonder about myself sometimes.
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#83
I noticed that too but I couldn't quite put my finger on it. There's a line in the season one finale, "What about the boating accident that killed your husband Andrew?", that really sealed the deal on what i'd been feeling throughout most of the show. It really is a televised soap opera, down the acting style and most of the plot elements. It's just also a soap opera with midgets and Bob (that scary fuck).

Ordered the Gold Box yesterday since it's half off on Amazon right now.
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#84
Twin Peaks, Season One: Episode Two

Random Thoughts:

1) The Horne Brothers. The Brie and Butter Sandwich. That whole opening scene. Demented genius. David Patrick Kelly! Where've you been, man? ...Probably wearing a gorilla outfit in a Richard Foreman play.

2) Our introduction to "Invitation To Love" arrives in this episode, even if we don't actually see any of the show itself.

3) One-Eyed Jacks manages the feat of being completely and utterly implausible, yet perfectly logical within the context of this series. A log cabin brothel wiith a large number of elaborately-costumed ladies of the evening....that apparently sit around waiting for Benjamin Horne to show up? Sure. Why not? Serves to add whole new levels of sleaze to the town's atmosphere and to the characters of the Horne Bros.

4) Audrey's Diner Dance (thank you, Sherilyn Fenn) cements my theory from episode one as fact: Those crazy teenagers love their spooky/sexy Jazz music. I imagine there being a whole alternate universe of beret-wearing, upright bass playing, Le Jazz Hot purveying musicians catering to the Audreys of Lynch's Alternate-Earth, and I love that.

5) In Twin Peaks no one, including the grownups, listens to anything resembling contemporary music. Leland's dance to Pennsylvania 6-5000 is a grostequerie of grief - simultaneously heart-rending and wince-inducing. The sight of him "dancing" with Laura's picture is a potent reminder of how important Lynch's personal vision is to this series. I don't think it's a coincidence that he directed this episode. Episode one was helmed by someone else and, while good, has a flat quality in comparison to both the pilot and this episode.

6) Do we ever learn the name of Bobby's lunk-head friend? The one that sort of looks like Anthony Rapp in Adventures In Babysitting? If we've already heard it, it hasn't stuck in my head. Their scene with Leo has a proto-Blair Witch feeling to it (the shots of the camera moving through the trees eerily capture the sensation of being deep in the woods late at night) and introduces yet another element I don't remember: The shadowy figure observing Bobby, Leo and (Insert Name Here) from behind a tree. Way to consistently creep me out during this episode, Lynch.

7) Maybe Nadine and her eye patch get annoying later on, but the end of her Quest For The Perfect, Silent, Draperunners was laugh-out-loud funny.

8) Had another one of those TV Deja Vu moments with Cooper's Tibetan deductive technique. I can remember exactly where I was the first time I watched that scene. And speaking of that scene: it's a corker, isn't it? From the way the Sherriff's Dept. all leans forward in their seats at the start of Coop's lecture, to the confusion over whether to put a check next to "the Jack with one eye," to Andy getting beaned in the head with an errant stone, this remains a marvelously off-kilter piece of acting and writing.

9) The Dream (or: David Lynch is channeling the devil)

At the end of a perfectly enjoyable episode, Cooper slides into bed at the Great Northern, settles in for a good night's rest, and promptly falls down a hellishly bizarre rabbit hole, dragging us along.

I'm completely unclear on the mythology of Bob and the one-armed man, but its weird, working-class mysticism ("we lived above...I think you call it...a convenience store"Wink adds to the sense of unease. Bob lived above a convenience store? So.....*spoiler* he's human? I thought he was a demon/spirit/boogeyman? Maybe he is now, but used to be human?*end spoiler* I like the suggestion that one-arm was just as vicious as Bob, but that there was some kind of conversion experience, leaving him to self-mutilate and rid himself of evil's influence. It's all very brief, which tends to add a lot more atmosphere than spelling things out.

And there's a LOT of atmosphere in this sequence. We cut from one-arm's eerie exposition to shots of The Dwarf shaking horribly with his back turned to the audience (that may be one of the more disturbingly nightmarish shots I've seen Lynch produce) and an aged Cooper in a Red Room. While I'm assuming that a lot of what the dwarf says to Coop is utter nonsense ("she's my sister"Wink, it's effectively bizarre and unnerving nonsense. Unlike the brief Bob appearances we've had so far (only Lynch and Frank Silva could make the line "I'm going to catch you in my death bag" sound like the worst fate in the world) the Little Man's first appearance isn't as much creepy/scary (barring that first, back-to-the-camera seizure shot) as it is surreal and off-putting.

Given that the episode ends with the Little Man dancing a slow groove to Audrey's prior Jukebox pick, and that the mood of the dance isn't so much creepy as unexplainably hilarious, I think it's safe to say that it feels as though Lynch is deliberately screwing with us at the end here. Here's a statement I'm utterly confident in making: At the time of this episode's airing, all over America, people turned to one another with enormous "what-the-fuck-just-happened" looks on their faces. I literally cannot believe that a major television network aired this. Was it ABC? CBS? NBC? I don't remember. What matters is, whoever greenlit this show has the sort of testicles ordinarily found on pachyderms.

All in all, a fantastic episode.
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#85
ABC. That episode was great!
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#86
I'm torn between starting either this, The West Wing or Mad Men what would be recommend.
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#87
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Originally Posted by Phil
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ABC. That episode was great!

Between this and Lost, ABC has my utmost respect for gambling on willfully obtuse primetime programming.
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#88
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Originally Posted by Jesse Custer
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6) Do we ever learn the name of Bobby's lunk-head friend? The one that sort of looks like Anthony Rapp in Adventures In Babysitting? If we've already heard it, it hasn't stuck in my head.

Mike. The two "Bob" and "Mike" duos are yet another example of the series' preoccupation with twinning/doppelgangers.

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9)I'm completely unclear on the mythology of Bob and the one-armed man, but its weird, working-class mysticism ("we lived above...I think you call it...a convenience store"Wink adds to the sense of unease. Bob lived above a convenience store? So.....*spoiler* he's human? I thought he was a demon/spirit/boogeyman? Maybe he is now, but used to be human?*end spoiler*

The mythology's never clearly explained, but there's a scene that takes place above the convenience store in Fire Walk With Me. Based on that scene, I don't think he's human. He's sort of an agent of the Black Lodge.

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While I'm assuming that a lot of what the dwarf says to Coop is utter nonsense ("she's my sister"Wink, it's effectively bizarre and unnerving nonsense.

Most of his lines are clues. Obtuse clues, but they're relevant. All this will be revealed, so don't swipe if you want to be surprised.

"She's my cousin. But doesn't she look almost exactly like Laura Palmer?" This foreshadows the arrival of Maddie, Laura's cousin, also played by Sheryl Lee.

"Where we're from, the birds sing a pretty song and there's always music in the air. " This is a reference to the cabin where Laura spent her last night. When Coop and Truman discover it, there's a record that's stuck, hence, "there's always music in the air."

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Given that the episode ends with the Little Man dancing a slow groove to Audrey's prior Jukebox pick, and that the mood of the dance isn't so much creepy as unexplainably hilarious, I think it's safe to say that it feels as though Lynch is deliberately screwing with us at the end here.

One one level, yeah. Especially his phone call to Harry ("I know who killed Laura Palmer."Wink On the other hand, I'm convinced that scenes like this are one of the main reasons Lynch was interested in doing the series in the first place.
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#89
It's interesting reading you guys try to analyze and decipher the show; I recall being deflated by the end because (again, as I recall) it became clear that it wasn't adding up to anything. I think I might just appreciate it as some kind of tone poem these days.
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#90
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Originally Posted by Phil
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It's interesting reading you guys try to analyze and decipher the show; I recall being deflated by the end because (again, as I recall) it became clear that it wasn't adding up to anything. I think I might just appreciate it as some kind of tone poem these days.

I'm taking the path of the unburdened tourist as I watch this: No expectations, no preconceptions (well, a few, but very few), and no demands.

I'm less interested in seeing whether the story hangs together/adds up than I am in soaking it all in and seeing what it provokes in me.

It's pretty liberating to watch the show this way. It helps that I'm prepared for a possible disappointment at the end, but it also helps that the show feels not unlike a tone poem, as you suggest.
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#91
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Originally Posted by Phil
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It's interesting reading you guys try to analyze and decipher the show; I recall being deflated by the end because (again, as I recall) it became clear that it wasn't adding up to anything. I think I might just appreciate it as some kind of tone poem these days.

Yeah, I haven't revisited the show, aside from a first season episode here and there, since the original run. I think it was largely because of the letdown of the second season. This thread inspired me to add the DVD set to the Christmas list, though.
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#92
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Originally Posted by Matt M
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Mike. The two "Bob" and "Mike" duos are yet another example of the series' preoccupation with twinning/doppelgangers.

Neat.

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Originally Posted by Matt M
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The mythology's never clearly explained, but there's a scene that takes place above the convenience store in Fire Walk With Me. Based on that scene, I don't think he's human. He's sort of an agent of the Black Lodge.

That's what I'd thought. Any ideas/notions as to where he was in the dream sequence? It looked like a boiler room. Does the 'death bag' ever come up again? Or is it a throwaway reference?

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Originally Posted by Matt M
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One one level, yeah. Especially his phone call to Harry ("I know who killed Laura Palmer."Wink On the other hand, I'm convinced that scenes like this are one of the main reasons Lynch was interested in doing the series in the first place.

Cooper saying "I know who killed Laura Palmer" at the episode's end really threw me for a loop (can't believe I forgot to toss that into my comments), because clearly that info can't come out yet. How will the show deal with this? When Cooper meets Truman is he going to say "I know, but for spiritual reasons, I can't tell you yet?" Because that would be lame.

And I agree with you - I think the show really comes alive when it gets the chance to be full-on weird. Without the dwarves and killer Bobs and sinister mysticism, the show would basically be Northern Exposure. I'm not interested (primarily) in small-town quirk. I'm interested in the inexplicable, and Peaks' best moments so far mine that territory with true élan.


ETA:

How could I forget the first appearance of Miguel Ferrer in episode 2? What a marvelously grating character, and what a perfect actor to pair that character with. His attitude, and Truman's uncommonly ticked response, made for a great moment. But Cooper's thumbs-up after the confrontation? Classic.
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#93
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Originally Posted by Jesse Custer
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That's what I'd thought. Any ideas/notions as to where he was in the dream sequence? It looked like a boiler room.

He's in the basement of the hospital. The part of the dream sequence dealing with Bob is a cut down version of the "wrap up" ending that Lynch shot for the pilot in order to sell it in foreign markets. You can watch the entire scene here:

Part 1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vCX9btvgR8o

Part 2 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ue-PwHC6oPQ

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Does the 'death bag' ever come up again? Or is it a throwaway reference?

Throwaway line, I think. As you'll see in the full scene, it's the last line of a poem.
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#94
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Originally Posted by Jesse Custer
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That's what I'd thought. Any ideas/notions as to where he was in the dream sequence? It looked like a boiler room. Does the 'death bag' ever come up again? Or is it a throwaway reference?

Cooper saying "I know who killed Laura Palmer" at the episode's end really threw me for a loop (can't believe I forgot to toss that into my comments), because clearly that info can't come out yet. How will the show deal with this? When Cooper meets Truman is he going to say "I know, but for spiritual reasons, I can't tell you yet?" Because that would be lame.

If I recall correctly the "death bag" reference and the other clues in this dream are revealed rather straight forward and definite for a Lynch project. Not to spoil anything but you will find out in one or two episodes anyway.

And for the "I know who killed Laura Palmer" mystery just wait for the beginning of next episode. The way they deal with that is so obvious and out of left field at the same time. It is glorious.
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#95
Just wait for the ending of Episode 4.
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#96
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Originally Posted by felix natalya
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Just wait for the ending of Episode 4.

Dammit. Now I am sold to rewatch it again right now. Just remembered that.

Wait for that indeed. But nothing tops the cliffhanger(s) at the end of the first season. I think they even admitted on the commentary that they screwed with the station deliberately by including as many cliffhangers as possible into to ensure a second season.
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#97
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Originally Posted by Syd
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What I love about the show is that, even though only one person is guilty of killing Laura Palmer, the town is full of terrible terrible people.

I love this too. I've been entertaining the notion that Bob, or the force Bob represents, has been 'sickening' the town for some time, and that's why the people behave as strangely and as terribly as they do - or that the town is 'sick' already as a result of its own misdeeds, allowing Bob to freely roam amongst its inhabitants and increase the weirdness exponentially.
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#98
See, you SAY you're not trying to "figure it out"...
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#99
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Originally Posted by Jesse Custer
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I love this too. I've been entertaining the notion that Bob, or the force Bob represents, has been 'sickening' the town for some time, and that's why the people behave as strangely and as terribly as they do - or that the town is 'sick' already as a result of its own misdeeds, allowing Bob to freely roam amongst its inhabitants and increase the weirdness exponentially.

True. James Hurley and Donna seem pretty untouched though.

P.S- Then again in Fire Walk With Me, you find out Donna isn't quite as innocent as we see here.
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I'm curious as to why you guys find BOB so scary. I'm asking this not as a skeptic, but as a fellow member of the BOB is scary club. What is it about his mojo that is just so damn freaky?
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Originally Posted by Devildoubt
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I'm curious as to why you guys find BOB so scary. I'm asking this not as a skeptic, but as a fellow member of the BOB is scary club. What is it about his mojo that is just so damn freaky?

I'd argue that a large part of his fear factor stems from both Lynch's use of sound in his scenes and in the disquietingly illogical placement of his appearances (see: the couch crawl, the 'hiding at the foot of the bed' moment, the sudden appearance as Laura's mom hugs Donna).

It's the juxtaposition of nightmare logic and fear-inducing soundscapes that triggers my Bob-fright.
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Bobby's friend's Mike's full name is Mike Nelson. No joke.

Also, what I love about that extended wrap up pilot ending is that we get a glimpse as to what Andy and Lucy do when they're alone together: Trumpets.

I always thought BOB was human at some point, and that his need for killing was so great that he continues to kill even after he is dead.
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Originally Posted by Syd
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I always thought BOB was human at some point, and that his need for killing was so great that he continues to kill even after he is dead.

I think at one point he's described as Mike's familiar. Of course, I don't think Mike's human, either. Otherwise, why would he need to possess Philip Gerard (the one-armed man's real name)?
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Originally Posted by Matt M
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I think at one point he's described as Mike's familiar. Of course, I don't think Mike's human, either. Otherwise, why would he need to possess Philip Gerard (the one-armed man's real name)?

Mike and BOB are not Human. They are spirits from the black lodge that feed on the pain and suffering of humans.
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Oh, invisotext, how you taunt me.

Must resist....urge to swipe....
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