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Welcome To Twin Peaks
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Originally Posted by Jesse Custer
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Oh, invisotext, how you taunt me.

Must resist....urge to swipe....

Look, I'll let you in on it. Mike and BOB are not human...they're Dallas Cowboys Fans.

ZING!
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Devildoubt
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Look, I'll let you in on it. Mike and BOB are not human...they're Dallas Cowboys Fans.

ZING!

If this were anything other than a David Lynch production I'd immediately write off your 'Zing'-er, but it's Lynch.

At this point I wouldn't be surprised if they ended up being Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders.
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So... have you reached the "living room/couch crawl" yet? Or was that in Season 2?
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Originally Posted by joeypants
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So... have you reached the "living room/couch crawl" yet? Or was that in Season 2?

No....I got hung up at work this week, and my Peaks plans had to halt while I played catch-up. Next episode goes in tonight. I've no idea when Bob's crawl happens in the course of the show, but I'm hoping it's sooner, rather than later. I'd rather get it over with now and spend the rest of the episodes convalescing.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by joeypants
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So... have you reached the "living room/couch crawl" yet? Or was that in Season 2?

That was season two. It happens when Maddy, James, and Donna are recording some song. James and Donna leaves, and BOB just wanders in to scare the living shit out of everyone.
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Originally Posted by Devildoubt
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That was season two.

Crap.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Devildoubt
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That was season two. It happens when Maddy, James, and Donna are recording some song. James and Donna leaves, and BOB just wanders in to scare the living shit out of everyone.

That's right. What an amazing moment that is. Ugh. *shudders*

I flew up to Springfield, MO to visit family this past week, and when I stayed at my aunts, the guest bedroom was laid out very similar to Laura Palmer's, and had an IDENTICAL bed (with the white bars at the head/foot and all that). It was hard to turn the light off and go to sleep. I couldn't stop visualizing BOB/Frank Silva at the end of the bed.

And I'm a 27 year old man. Thanks, David Lynch.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by felix natalya
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I so agree with that. In fact, Sherilyn Fenn was offered her own spin-off Audrey series but she refused.

You SURE about that? Never heard about it.
So how does she [OBVIOUS SERIES 2 FINAL EPISODE SPOILERS] survive the bank explosion whilst being handcuffed to the vault gate?

...or is it a prequel?
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According to an interview with Sherilyn, her Audrey character was always expected to survive in the finale. She was offered a spin-off (Audrey in the Big City) but refused.
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Twin Peaks, Season One: Episodes Three and Four

Random Musings:

1) At this point in the series, Cooper is totally flirting with Audrey. There's not a man alive who'd blame him for this, but it occurs to me that in the world-of-the-show, Audrey's a high schooler, and Cooper is assumedly early-thirties.

2) Nice job explaining away Cooper's last-episode revelation about knowing the identity of Laura's killer. And by nice, I mean it's both effective and also a little frustrating (I keep having to remind myself that this show aired at a time when waiting a WHOLE SEASON for Cooper to solve the murder was WAY TOO LONG, at least according to the show's critics). We get the first connection between real life and Cooper's 'dream code' with the revelation that Laura had been bound with her arms drawn back ("sometimes, my arms bend back"Wink, and we get the sense that, however dreamlike the mythology of the show is, there's also a sense of purpose to it.

3) Albert's morgue fight is fantastic. Sad, funny, strange...all the things this show does best. Truman knocking Albert over the corpse was gruesomely satisfying, but the scene's best moment depends again on Cooper - whose tender handling of Laura's exposed arm reminds us that he is the calm and steady moral center of this show, predilection for young girls notwithstanding.

Albert line of the episode: "Why don't you return to your porch rockers and resume whittling."

4) Laura's cousin Madeline makes her first appearance. I'd remembered her looking like Laura (and how happy was Sheryl Lee when Lynch decided on this plotline?), but not that she looks like some SNL caricature of a 'nerdy girl'. With her enormous red glasses and her tangled-looking dark hair, she perhaps reinforces Lynch's ongoing preoccupation with doubles and twinning. She's the bookworm to Laura's prom queen.

So far. After all, she does get a makeover if memory serves.

5) "Look at that! Ducks! On a lake!" My Cooper love continues unabated.

6) Bobby appears to have one default setting: Surly, with a side of crazy.

7) And speaking of Surly/Crazy Bobby, Laura's funeral, which I remember being funny, is deeply sad to me now. Bobby's freak out moment here is both uncharacteristically poignant and righteous. By calling out the town and implicating them all in Laura's death - even himself - he pulls to the surface the underlying feeling that's been permeating the episodes so far: this town is sick, and getting sicker.

Leland's coffin jump remains firmly balanced between black comedy and real pathos - it's in the same willfully-weird vein as Bobby's car hood surfing routine. It goes on too long, veers from comedy to tragedy and back to comedy again, and contains this line, potent on many levels: "Don't you ruin this too."

8) We meet the Bookhouse Boys, a 'secret society' I have zero recollection of, but which cements the series' backwoods supernaturalism by evoking a twenty year tradition of standing against an acknowledged darkness - an opposite to the 'good things' Twin Peaks offers Cooper and the town's residents. I immediately want to know more about the Boys. How were they formed, and why? why is James involved with them, and yet keeping mum about Laura with another member (Truman)?

Do any of you know if the Bookhouse Boys becomes anything more than a throwaway plot strand?

9) Norma's incarcerated husband's up for parole - that can't be good for her or Ed. And speaking of Ed - the actor playing him conveys a world of frustrated isolation in the arms of his mad-pirate wife, Nadine. I have a growing sense that their storyline will end up going nowhere, but for now their relationship is strange enough, and brittle enough, to be interesting on its own emotional terms.

Do we ever find out how Ed and Nadine ended up together? Or what happened to Nadine's eye? Her speech to him about being the 'little brown mouse' that watched Ed and Norma at all the football games makes me think that only another man could have come between the two high school lovers - and that man was probably Norma's now-husband. So did Ed marry Nadine out of loss and spite, seeing the sort of devotion in her that he thought he couldn't get from Norma?

10) Mike, the one-armed shoe salesman, enters the plot. I'm admittedly confused about him - he seems to know nothing of what Cooper is talking about (though he could always be lying), but he's undoubtably the man from Coop's dream - complete with missing arm and former tattoo. And isn't it interesting that the tattoo said "BOB"? Given that the Bob it supposedly refers to is a harmless vet, and not the Bob of our collective nightmares, and given the way Mike relates Bob's current, comatose state and his breakdown when saying his friends' name, can we assume that they were lovers?

11) Norma's husband appears, and I suddenly remember his whole domino fetish. Clearly, the man ain't reformed, but the whole "I can change/I've changed" thing is such a classic Soap trope that it feels less like cliche and more like loving homage.

12) Invitation to Love continues to increase it's presence - we get to see a clip from one of the show's within the show, and it's an appropriately convoluted mishmash of threatened paternal suicide and seduction by identical twin (clearly referencing Laura and Madeline's duality, and the subject of dualism itself).

13) The Old Mill plot picks up some steam. One of the things I'm enjoying about the show: people, as a rule, talk to each other. When Josie suspects Piper Laurie of cooking the books and conspiring with Horne to kill her, she tells Truman. Another show might have her keep it all a secret for the sake of drawing out tension, but it feels more organic approached this way.

And it appears Norma's husband has a connection/attachment to Josie, as we see her opening a letter containing a pencil sketch of a domino moments before she gets a call from him asking if she's gotten his letter (nice timing, still-incarcerated hubby).

14) The noose draws tighter around Leo's neck as Bobby frames him with the bloody shirt that Shelly's been holding onto - and speaking of Shelly....good god. Her scene with Bobby in the kitchen is smokin' hot. Any red-blooded man would happily voluteer to teach her how to use that gun.

There's a lot of plot and character being stuffed into every episode, and I'm loving it. Can't wait to dig in more over the weekend.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Jesse Custer
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Twin Peaks, Season One: Episodes Three and Four

Random Musings:

1) At this point in the series, Cooper is totally flirting with Audrey. There's not a man alive who'd blame him for this, but it occurs to me that in the world-of-the-show, Audrey's a high schooler, and Cooper is assumedly early-thirties.

As will become more and more evident over the rest of season one, the plan was for their relationship to actually go somewhere. However, backstage politics took over when Maclachlan started dating Lara Flynn Boyle, and she supposedly put the kibosh on that. When you look at what happened to Coop in Season Two...well, she's kind of the Yoko of Twin Peaks.

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6) Bobby appears to have one default setting: Surly, with a side of crazy.

I think Bobby ends up being one of the more interestingly complicated characters on the show. I tend to think that he genuinely did love Laura, but that he was also an asshole who used her and cheated on her. He's also (as your next note points out) one of the more self-aware residents of the town. Plus, you've got to love his relationship with the Major.

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7)Leland's coffin jump remains firmly balanced between black comedy and real pathos - it's in the same willfully-weird vein as Bobby's car hood surfing routine. It goes on too long, veers from comedy to tragedy and back to comedy again, and contains this line, potent on many levels: "Don't you ruin this too."

Note too: a malfunctioning electrical device. This is a recurring thing.

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8)Do any of you know if the Bookhouse Boys becomes anything more than a throwaway plot strand?

It's a little more than throwaway, but you never get a ton of backstory. Sidenote: a bar in Atlanta just opened named the "Bookhouse Pub." Apparently, it's an explicit reference to the show. EDIT: A dessert on the menu is called "This is Where Pies Go When They Die."

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9)And speaking of Ed - the actor playing him conveys a world of frustrated isolation in the arms of his mad-pirate wife, Nadine. I have a growing sense that their storyline will end up going nowhere...

Luckily, you're wrong.

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Do we ever find out how Ed and Nadine ended up together? Or what happened to Nadine's eye?

Yes and yes. And you'll learn that there's one answer to both questions.

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14)...and speaking of Shelly....good god. Her scene with Bobby in the kitchen is smokin' hot. Any red-blooded man would happily voluteer to teach her how to use that gun.

I love Madchen Amick, and was always sorry her career didn't take off. She had a nice run of guest spots on Gilmore Girls, though. Plus, she was the Tattoo character on the mid-90s Fantasy Island revamp.
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Leland's "coffin jump" is one of my favorite moments from the series. That and the "somebody dance with me!?" that follows.

Like you said, the most amazing balance of true sadness/pathos and jaw-droppingly hilarious black-comedy I've ever witnessed. I had feelings at that point already, but those moments were when I knew that no matter what was going to happen the rest of the series, this was something very special.

And again, could not BELIEVE this was a prime-time, major network series.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Matt M
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you've got to love his relationship with the Major.

Yes. Yes you do. Their conversation before the funeral is all kinds of good. The Major's calm, rational manner and Bobby's increasingly erratic behavior make for good television. "aFRAID?!?!? I'm going to turn it...UPSIDE DOWN!"

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Originally Posted by Matt M
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Luckily, you're wrong.

Oh good.

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Originally Posted by Matt M
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Yes and yes. And you'll learn that there's one answer to both questions.

Even better.

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Originally Posted by Matt M
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I love Madchen Amick, and was always sorry her career didn't take off. She had a nice run of guest spots on Gilmore Girls, though. Plus, she was the Tattoo character on the mid-90s Fantasy Island revamp.

I love her too. Audrey's a knockout, but Shelly was the one to kick my tires and light my fires back in the day. Clearly that hasn't changed.

Didn't know about her and the Fantasy Island revamp - that's a show I'd be interested in seeing, as I never caught it the first time around. Apparently, it's not available for rent at blockbuster online, though.
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I think you'll love Audrey's Nancy Drew activities in the episodes to come.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by felix natalya
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I think you'll love Audrey's Nancy Drew activities in the episodes to come.

Oh, yes!
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Speaking as a man, I found Cooper's Hotel room reaction to her not just incomprehensible but unforgivable. (You know the scene I mean).
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So on the day I am getting this from netflix the fucking AV room is running an interview with a star of the show which spoils shit for me from the hyperlink.
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That sucks (and I know just what headline you're talking about). But if it's any consolation, you'll never ever be able to figure out the how and why of it until the revelation is given in the show.

EDIT: Speaking of the AV Club, over the summer they did an episode-by-episode breakdown of the series over at the TV Club that those watching it may find interesting.

http://www.avclub.com/content/tvclub/show/Twin%2BPeaks
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Well that's good to know. I've watched the first three episodes so far and I'm enjoying it thoroughly. I love the music and MachLachlan is brilliant. I'm just amazed this show made it onto Network Television in 1990.
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Jesse, this is great.

I just started watching the Gold Box this week myself, and I'm skimming a little bit so as not to be drawn into any invisotext spoilers. I watched the first season when it originally aired and loved it but something happened with my schedule because I didn't return for season 2, not even to have the mystery solved (sadly, I later learned the killer's identity, at least I THINK I did).

I'm with Syd, Miguel Ferrer seems to be having a great time with this and is fun to watch. My wife has never seen Twin Peaks and as we got started I winced at some of the cheesier soap-opera aspects. But it has pulled her right in so I guess the formula still works, at least for someone as twisted and black-humored as my wife.

The dvd has a "Log Lady Intro" for each ep. and I don't remember those from the original airing. Were they always part of the show?
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The Log Lady intros were written and shot for Bravo when the show reaired there in the late 90s.
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Can you watch the eps without the Log Lady intros?
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Aha. Thanks. I actually recorded at least some of the Bravo eps on VHS but moved and lost the tapes before I ever had a chance to revisit them.

ETA: Phil, I have been. My wife has some kind of hate-on for poor Log Lady.
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I've made it just past the reveal of the killer and sadly I've found myself not so motivated in going forward. Is it worth it cause there are a lot of episodes left?
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The episode immediately following the reveal is great. Then it's going to be pretty thin gruel until the last episode (Lynch was off doing Wild at Heart around this time). But that episode is worth getting to.
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Ok, when you guys talk about Bob's couch crawl is this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_B5pE1DEHyk

SPOILERS in the video title.

what you guys are talking about? Because a friend sent me that and if that's not the most terrifying infamous moment I'm not sure I want to see the one that beats it.
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Yep, that's good old Bob. From now on, whenever I see something moving in the distance out of the corner of my eye, I assume it's him.
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Kenneth Welsh is so over the top as Windom Earle. He may as well have been literally chewing the scenery. His introduction when he meets Leo is some fabulous entertainment. He makes the last half of season 2 interesting when he's on.

The Donna/James/Evelyn Marsh storyline? Pure crap.
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Bob will have to work hard to out-terrify the baby in Eraserhead to earn the Most Horrifying Lynch Creation award but Jesus, that clip shot him up in the rankings a bit.

It's irrational I know but I can't wait to dig into the second season when I get home on Sunday and finally get my copy of the Gold Box.
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Yeah, so I got the Gold Box for Christmas. I had only seen bits and pieces of the show before (I was only 6-7 years old when it originally aired), but I am huge Lynch fan. Now I'm a even bigger fan. This has to be my favorite hour long of all time. I even like the episodes after Laura's killer is revealed. There is a drop off in quality, and a couple of really dumb subplots (James' milf, Joan Chen turning into a wooden knob) but it's still better than most TV. I don't know how I feel about the film though. I like it, but I really wish it had a bit more "new" material in it that wasn't already covered in the show. Ok, now I'm gonna get into a bit of spoiler territory so if you haven't seen the entire series and movie don't read on.





So I guess at the end of the series, that's Cooper's doppleganger that made it out of the Black Lodge? Which is why in episode 2 when he has the first Black Lodge Dream it's 25 years later...he apparently never gets out of it. This would also go along with what Annie says to Laura in her dream in Fire Walk With Me, about the good Dale being trapped in the lodge. She also asks Laura to write this in her diary, I'm guessing so that when Dale reads it, he'll know not to go into the Lodge in the first place?

While I'm rambling on, I'd like to see if anyone here has any idea who the hell "Judy" is? David Bowie's character says he's not gonna talk about Judy, then the monkey says Judy at the end of the movie...but I don't recall there being a Judy in the series or the film.

Anyways, I know this is a pretty incoherent post, but I guess I just needed to get some of the crap that's been going around in my head the last couple of weeks out.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Jakespeare
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Ok, when you guys talk about Bob's couch crawl is this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_B5pE1DEHyk

SPOILERS in the video title.

what you guys are talking about? Because a friend sent me that and if that's not the most terrifying infamous moment I'm not sure I want to see the one that beats it.

I really upset that this sequence still freaks me out. I'm a grown-ass man...some freaky-deaky, Wavy Gravy-lookin Motherfucker climbin over the furniture like some damn drunken retarded teenager should not freak me out.
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Ugh. Longest hiatus from a show ever - I hate traveling during the holidays and not being able to take my dvds with me (I suppose I could, but it'd be a real pain in the ass). So glad to see that the thread has inspired some others to go out and check this show out.

If you're interested in following along as I resume my inane episode commentaries, I'd love to continue discussing.

And Matt, thanks for that link to the AV Club. I'm not going to read it until I've finished for spoiler reasons, but I love their commentaries generally, so now I've got that to look forward to.
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No, Devildoubt...MUCH freakier.


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Anyone link this intro to Season 2, hosted by Alan Thicke?
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Twin Peaks, Season One: Episode Five

In some ways, this episode was a letdown - zero Bob, no visions, no long dissertations on Tibetan clue-throwing - and in others it was unexpectedly rich.

It concentrated on moving all the various characters and their storylines forward (an impressive feat, in and of itself. If you count anyone with a significant subplot as a 'main' character, then by my count there are approximately thirty 'main' characters running around this town), and it did a pretty excellent job of it.

Random thoughts:

1) Invitation to Love gets better and stranger with each installment. This week's clip features the oddly-nebbishy 'hero' getting thrown around by someone with a killer mullet and Steve Dallas-style sunglasses. As hilarious as that is, there's also something to the way Mullet-Dallas rears back and yells after pushing Nebbish Man to the ground that's discomfiting and primal.

2) Which brings me to my next thought: There's a conflict going on in this show between animalistic and civilized behavior that's pervasive enough and creepy enough to deserve noting. Evil doesn't shout or yell on this show - it roars.

3) Shelly! Not only are you gorgeous, you're also a stone-cold gunslinger. I don't believe that her shot killed Leo, but it was still unexpected. I anticipated her being convinced to slowly lower the gun. Of note: When she shoots him, we get another spooky shot of an overhead light, and a repeat of that skin-crawling drone on the soundtrack from Bob's first appearance. Signifying Shelly's act as evil? Signifying Bob/Evil's presence? Signifying nothing?

4) Good to know that Audrey meets the legal age requirements for consent. Cooper seems pleased about this as well.

5) Leyland is officially insane by way of grief. How many times has he done this whole 'dancing with myself' thing, now? It's at least the third iteration. I'll be pleased if the repetition is revealed to have a deeper meaning. What's interesting is how the people around him react to each of these episodes. His wife screams at him the first time, and seems frightened by his dancing with Laura's picture. His second solo-dance was brief, public, and concluded with warm understanding and sympathy from the onlookers. This time, he's an embarrassment to be swept under the rug as everyone around him pretends really hard to normalcy. Catherine's dance with him, where she turns his unsettling habit of crying with his hands poised like antlers into a kind of party joke, is genuinely upsetting in its coldness.

If it's intentionally a commentary on how human beings tend to deal with real, raw grief, it's pretty f'ing brilliant. If it's not, it works as one anyway.

Audrey's reaction to all of this is priceless, and heartbreaking.

6) The singing Icelanders continue to prove the show's profound gift for off-kilter oddity. There's nothing twee or precious about the sort of strangeness this show courts. We spend no time with these businessmen and "Sons of Odin" (Jerry Horne, you are a great character), and they aren't given any personality or backstory. They're simply an obstacle for Cooper and Horne to overcome.

7) I'm not sold on Norma's returning husband. The show feels jam-packed with incident and character, and his addition feels unnecessary. He's Leo, v2.0, just older and more soap-y looking. Although his return does instigate a nicely poignant exchange between Norma and Big Ed, where they both reveal a self-damaging capacity to put others before themselves, and Norma tells Ed that she loves him - only to have Ed's response be silence.

8) If I get this right, the Log Lady's cabin is not too distant from Jacques Reno's. Is that why they approach it with guns drawn - in the mistaken belief that it's Reno's place? The Log Lady stuff is both close-to-too-cutesy and bracingly bizarre. I like that her nonsense sentences feel like they should have a payoff down the line (and from memory, I already know that any talk about Owls should be heeded). I have little recollection of the character from when the show first ran, but it occurs to me now as I 'm rewatching the show that the Log Lady may have some kind of connection/relation to the force for Good in this show, if such a force actually exists.

The question for me is this: Is it the sort of connection that genre writers conventionally engineer: that of the imbalanced/insane/troubled individual given insight into higher matters? Or is it more of a Mike/Bob thing, where the Log Lady is some physical manifestation of the White Lodge?

9) Reno's cabin was surprisingly uncreepy.

10) Back on page one I'd said that I'll probably be itching to hit fast forward whenver Josie's story came to the fore, but her thread was the biggest shock for me last night. It's revealed that Horne and she have some sort of understanding behind Catherine's back, and that Horne has led Josie to Catherine's concealed book. Is this because Horne is laying a trap for Josie? Is he playing both sides? Are he and Josie sleeping together? Why do I sound like a fifty year old housewife with too many cats as I ask these questions?

11) Bobby's therapy session was disturbing, and not in the typical, Lynchian, 'show a dwarf talking about creamed corn' disturbing way. There was a profound sense of violation to the proceedings - from the way Jacoby somewhat-inexplicably forces himself into Bobby's roiling guilt, anger and fear, to the confessions they both utter about Laura. That Laura's soul-sickness drove her to 'corrupt' others isn't exactly a revelation, but the hints of the past few episodes are made explicit here, and the actor playing Bobby does his best work so far on Jacoby's couch. We get the feeling that Laura has fundamentally 'rotted' some portion, if not all of, Bobby's innocence. And in the final moments of the scene we get a glimpse of the Bobby that might have been, had Laura not worked her black magic on him. It's sad, and moving, and weird (what's with those glasses, Jacoby? One's rose-colored, and one's blue. Is this a purely quirky, asthetic choice? Or are we being told that the character is half optimist, half pragmatist?).

12) That final shot: Egads. "Please don't make me leave," coupled with a sheet-covered Sherilyn Fenn, was enough to make me want to watch the next episode immediately - but that'll have to wait for tonight.

A solid episode, made more impressive by the fact that, despite my (albeit somewhat-waning) dislike for the soapier elements, the storylines and characters were compelling throughout.
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