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INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS Post-Release
#71
It's more of a Holocaust wish fulfillment movie.
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#72
The way I look at the ending has little to do with revisionism, so much as Tarantino using what we think will be the inevitable outcome (Hitler dies as normal) against the audience to create tension. He said in the first chapter this is a "once upon a time" tale. You don't think the basterds or Shoshana can pull it off. Instead they do.
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#73
It's weird...I fucking love the movie, but I feel like I was in on the joke the whole time since I read the script when it leaked...I need to see it again to separate myself from the script and just soak in the movie. QT is a genius, always has been, he just got sidetracked dicking around in the recording booth...now he's laying down tracks.
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#74
Quote:

Originally Posted by Andre Dellamorte
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The way I look at the ending has little to do with revisionism, so much as Tarantino using what we think will be the inevitable outcome (Hitler dies as normal) against the audience to create tension. He said in the first chapter this is a "once upon a time" tale. You don't think the basterds or Shoshana can pull it off. Instead they do.

Yeah, I'm not sure people in the audience realized this was truly a fantasy until Hitler is killed. And it works beautifully.
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#75
Saw it in an old-school, 1000 seat theater, with a pipe organ, and the organist played about 40 minutes of music from WWII movies and TV before the show started - everything from Der Blau Angel to Hogan's Heroes.

Easily QT's best since Pulp Fiction. Not a single dud in the cast - Waltz, Laurent, & Pitt were awesome. Denis Menochet as the dairy farmer was heart-breaking in the opening scene.

We were talking about the ahistorical parts of the ending afterward, and my kid pegged it - a film like Valkyrie has you waiting for everything to go to shit throughout, since you know the plot didn't come off from a historical perspective. You're constantly expecting the wheels to come off of Operation Kino throughout Inglourious Basterds, since we know Hitler didn't buy it in a Parisian movie theater. By ignoring the history, Tarantino manages to subvert your expectations and deliver a great ending. Really brilliant.
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#76
I'll also echo what's been said by a few others: the image of Shoshana's face burning up on the movie screen is the shot of the year so far. It's stunning. Also, the David Bowie song fit perfectly with the scene in which it was used.
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#77
Moon is still my #1 pic of the year, but this is a very close second. I got back from it two hours ago and I still feel like I've been on the biggest caffeine/sugar high of my life.

The ending was just awe-inspiring. I was shocked that Hitler died, but it worked magnificently.

I just hope the movie does well. The 7:15 p.m. show I went to was about half full, and really kind of reminded me of the opening night show of Grindhouse I went to. It seems like some of the people there really enjoyed it, but people were getting up and walking around like crazy throughout most of the film.

While I'm sure most of the people on this board (Princess Kate aside) will shower praise on this film to people they speak to, I have a bad feeling that the general audience's word of mouth might kill the movie. Once it leaks that there's a substantial amount of subtitles, a lot of people will keep away from it. Plus, I don't think the "fantasy" aspect of the film we be appreciated by a large demographic.

But fuck those people, Inglorious Basterds was amazing.
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#78

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#79
I seriously doubt this will get bad word of mouth...the subtitles don't seem to be an issue in any screenings.
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#80
Quote:

Originally Posted by Andre Dellamorte
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Masterpieces are films that have stood the test of time, this has stood the test of twenty-some hours. It's really good. Possibly great. Maybe even perfect. But, guys... Grammar police is pulling masterpiece over on this one.

No, CLASSICS are films that have stood the test of time. Masterpieces are the greatest work in an artist's oeuvre. Generally not decided on until the artist stops creating art, but of Tarantino's film work thus far, calling 'Basterds' his masterpiece may not be too much of a stretch.

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Tarantino is flat out telling us why and how cinema impacts him (and us), showing us first hand the motion picture's unique power for catharsis, for vindicating and empowering us, for bringing us together.

I love how, in Shosanna and Zoller's final moments, it shows us how film can distort our perception of reality. Throughout the entire movie we're led to believe that Zoller is this reluctant soldier, and more reluctant hero. There's an imagined tinge of regret when he says '68. The first day. 150. The second day. 32 the third day.' But then when he goes up to the projection booth, it's revealed that he's actually kind of an asshole, and he's proud of what he did for his country. He's not comfortable watching it dramatized, but it's something he'd probably do again if asked, and he deserves to be gunned down like he is. And then Shosanna looks out the window, and sees the scene of him looking pained and self-loathing, and she thinks that guy on the screen is the guy she just shot, and the moment of tenderness gets her killed.

And nobody else has mentioned it, but in a lot of ways, the whole thing works kind of like a con movie, but one where the audience is in on all the mechanics and players of the con, but the players themselves aren't. Watch Aldo and the Basterds, Landa, pay no attention to the woman who owns the cinema (and who we're pretty sure you know is the young woman who escaped from you three years ago).
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#81
I could be wrong, but is this the first Tarantino movie that does not include his signature "trunk POV" shot? I kept waiting for it, but it never showed up.
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#82
I'm still trying to process everything I've just seen....this is the only reaction I can muster at this point:

Jeezus H. Christ.

Christoph Waltz.....WOW. He was in a lengthy scene with Brad fucking Pitt and completely out-acted him. Like, handily. My jaw was agape in disbelief at how great his all-around performance was. My god. The consummate villian. A total and utter piece of shit of a human being, but damn it all to hell, I WANTED him to win at the end. What does that make me?
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#83
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ambler
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It's weird...I fucking love the movie, but I feel like I was in on the joke the whole time since I read the script when it leaked...I need to see it again to separate myself from the script and just soak in the movie. QT is a genius, always has been, he just got sidetracked dicking around in the recording booth...now he's laying down tracks.

I had this "problem" too. I still kick myself for reading the script, but Goddamn was this film great. I almost want to see it without having read the script, while at the same time knowing just what kind of movie I was in for (i.e. not a shoot out, wacky band of soldiers movie) really helped my viewing experience.

But a part of me does just really want to see a wacky, old school adventure with the Basterds before this movie's events. You know they had a heck of a lot of adventures here and there, but this movie's not about them.

Hans Landa...greatest villain ever.
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#84
I saw the first and last showings today. Friggin brilliant. Christoph Waltz was fantastic. His scene at the table with Shosanna had me bitting my nails. (Speaking of which, I loved Mélanie Laurent in this, especially that scene.) I'm curious as to what happened to the other Basterds though.


Jakespeare, was your showing messed up before the movie, and the end credits? I had to endure the Halloween II trailer twice, and the end credits shut off a minute into them. Its like our theater forgot how to work a film projector.
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#85
This film needs to go the way of Network, On the Waterfront and The Godfather: Part II and get a handful of acting noms.

Mélanie Laurent, Christoph Waltz, Michael Fassbender, and even Daniel Brühl and Diane Kruger all blew me away.

It's just under Reservoir Dogs and Jackie Brown as my favorite QT films, but it's my favorite of the year so far. Damned, damned excellent movie.

By the way: full theater, applause at the end. Everyone ate it up and loved it.
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#86
I think this film trumped Fight Club out of my #1 spot...my favorite QT movie ever!
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#87
This is one fucking crazy WW2 flick. The most earnest expression from QT so far. I actually want to see it again, just to see it without my high expectations. And now I'm keen on finding out what was cut, because it was so damn great.

Interesting to note how dark they took the Landa kills Hammersmark scene. Gives him real shading, even though he's so charismatic throughout, especially after he turns himself over.

Agreed with others that there are some classic shots in this film.
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#88
Quote:

Originally Posted by Fafhrd
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No, CLASSICS are films that have stood the test of time. Masterpieces are the greatest work in an artist's oeuvre. Generally not decided on until the artist stops creating art, but of Tarantino's film work thus far, calling 'Basterds' his masterpiece may not be too much of a stretch.

Semantically, you are correct. But if we're going to call it his best work, I still think it needs to settle more than first reactions. I guess I should have said hyperbole police. Make no mistake, I love this movie. But Jackie Brown got a cold reaction upon release, and now - arguably - it's his best film. I'm just saying.
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#89
Zoller's bursting in the projection booth was there for him to be suddenly unsympathetic enough for her to kill. It would have been more interesting for her to have to shoot him without that. My co-viewer said he was an asshole all along, and it was the inevitable outcome of his character. That's also true.

I pointed out that at least the film made the point of him disliking his violence depicted onscreen; my friend said he just wanted to have sex while people watched him kill people. Others said he was too heavy handedly a Good German, which I completely disagree with.

I don't think I can defend it against the accusation that it's just a collection of good tense scenes, or that more fleshed out detail outside of those scenes would have been cool. But the production being rushed seemed to be part and parcel of it getting made. As it was, it was immensely entertaining and flamboyant... all I can think of is Rod Taylor sitting in the corner of a empty room to say two lines... calling attention to itself constantly. Less handholding would have been nice (like the text identifying Shoshanna), and the voiceover explaining that nitrate film stock is explosive.

My audience clapped at the end, and cheered the climactic violence. The wonderful distance in the phrase "This is the face of Jewish vengeance" was touching and sad. Certainly an implication of the film is that Nazi bad guys (or any scapegoat, even as Hollywood uses Nazis) are a mental crutch and perhaps punishable by a Giant Face.
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#90
Maybe I'm being dense, or the awesomeness of the experience made me miss something, but why did Landa let Shoshanna go at the beginning of the film? They had a truck and two motorcycles, so they certainly could have caught her. Any ideas?
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#91
Quote:

Originally Posted by KungFuCornelius
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Maybe I'm being dense, or the awesomeness of the experience made me miss something, but why did Landa let Shoshanna go at the beginning of the film? They had a truck and two motorcycles, so they certainly could have caught her. Any ideas?

I think it's because to Landa, it's all a game. He enjoys the thrill, and isn't praticularlly for or against the Nazis. He's working for the people that let him do what he loves. I am sure he thinks he'll catch her eventually (and possibly recognizes her later, but again, does nothing)
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#92
Yes I haven't made up my mind whether he knew who she was or not. It seemed like he knew who she was at the restaurant, but then again probably not, because he talked so much about the Kino Plan with Pitt etc, but never spoke out loud of this potential other side of the problem. But maybe he thought the cinema owner/escaped girl was in on the Allied operation or something like that
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#93
I'm wondering if "Operation Kino" would have actually been a more appropriate title.

I think QT was playing with us a little bit with the restaurant scene. There's no particular reason he should recognize a girl he only saw from behind at a far distance. Certainly nothing she consciously does gives her away. It's more of a Columbo sixth sense at play in his subconscious is my conclusion.
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#94
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ambler
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I seriously doubt this will get bad word of mouth...the subtitles don't seem to be an issue in any screenings.

Yeah, they were probably not a big deal in the initial screenings, as most of the people seeing it last were diehard fans of QT. While I appreciated the use of subtitles in the film (I hate it when english is spoken by everyone in films taking place in foreign lands), I don't think there's any disputing that in general most Americans hate subtitles. As more than half of 153 minute run time is in subtitles, word of mouth from the few moviegoers that don't appreciate the use of them will have an impact on the outcome of the movie.
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#95
the only subtitle related issue I had was when the cinema girl's film broke in during the murderous screening, she was speaking English. She wanted to let the Germans know what for, so how come she didn't speak in German? Well obviously QT wanted that monologue in English for the impact on his own audience, even though it barely made sense not to do it in German.
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#96
Agree on the Michael Fassbender love. The bar scene was one of the most intense scenes I've seen in a recent film. He had a phenomenal German accent (He's German), but he also had one hell of a British one. Came off really smooth, was very impressed with him. Kinda sad that he wasn't in the film la lot more with Schwieger.
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#97
Another scene that I haven´t seen mentioned yet but deserves so is the QT foot-fetish scene. The cinderella allusion had me on the edge of my seat. And having sexy thoughts about feet.
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#98
So very, very glad I didn't read the script and stayed away from most reviews before going to see this. I'm still digesting the movie, but I was blown away last night. Shoshanna's spectral voice and image in the smoke...FUCK.

Good movie.
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#99
The most fun in a theater I've had all year. Hitler taking machine gun fire to the face... AWESOME.

My audience actually shouted "USA! USA!" at the bloody climax. Normally this would have annoyed the fuck out of me, but this audience was so into the film I can't begrudge them. Best audience I've ever had that wasn't a BNAT.
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I saw this in a crowd filled with stupid hicks. They ate it up.

I don't even know where to start with this movie. Actually, I do. The shot of the basterd running down the hall in slow-motion with the "punch gun." I loved how there were no set pieces, just a dozen quick moments of brutal violence or action.

I can't wait to see it again. And again. And again.

ETA: Drudge spoiled that they killed Hitler which bummed me out. But there were three amazing reversals I didn't see coming. Didn't see Kreuger's death coming. Didn't see The Jew Hunter deciding to be complicit in the plot to killer Hitler. And I really didn't see Shoshana getting killed in the projection booth.

Also, I know it's been said before, but it felt like QT decided to top his "eggplant scene" from TRUE ROMANCE twice, just to show he could. The opening and the basement scenes are some of the most intense dialogue sequences I've ever seen.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by John Galt
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I could be wrong, but is this the first Tarantino movie that does not include his signature "trunk POV" shot? I kept waiting for it, but it never showed up.

Both scenes of Aldo carving swastikas into foreheads used the "trunk POV".
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Quote:

Originally Posted by cfMC
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the only subtitle related issue I had was when the cinema girl's film broke in during the murderous screening, she was speaking English. She wanted to let the Germans know what for, so how come she didn't speak in German? Well obviously QT wanted that monologue in English for the impact on his own audience, even though it barely made sense not to do it in German.

Makes perfect sense: she's speaking the language of their enemies.
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She or Marcel mentions the use of English when they are about to film it. I think it's justified as she wants Landa to know that she has since learned the language the ignorance of which led to the death of her family.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Greg Clark
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Makes perfect sense: she's speaking the language of their enemies.

That and she doesn't speak German.
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It might not be a return to form, but its certainly his best written, most surprising movie since Jackie Brown. There's so much to take in I was literally leaning forward in my seat. I found my hand covering my mouth in the middle of that FANTASTIC tavern scene. I gasped when I first saw Landa in the "strudel" scene. I guffawed when Landa put his cigarette out in his cream. I reacted to this movie like I was in love with it. Because I was. The time flew by in a way that hasn't happened with one of his movies since Pulp Fiction (I think you're supposed to feel the time tick by in Jackie Brown). I got wrapped up in it. The movie tickled me. It made me squeal with delight. It made me clap like an idiotic chimpanzee. And it made me think...I was still talking about it for hours after. I loved Death Proof and Kill Bill, but in a lesser way.

Best film of the year. Fan as I am, I never thought I'd write that about a Tarantino movie again. Best film of the fucking year.
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