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I see that BAD LIEUTENANT: PORT OF CALL NEW ORLEANS is on Amazon Prime.

To the break of dawn.
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Filmstruck Friday:

- Movie of the Week: "Out of the Past" (maybe THE prototypical noir?)
- Star of the Week: Lena Horne (12 films)
- Director of the Week: Jean-Pierre Melville (11 films, including Le Cercle Rouge, Le Samourai and Bob Le Flambeur)
- Theme: "Stewart & Mitchum: Two Faces of America" (13 films, including the only film Stewart and Mitchum starred in together (the 1976 remake of THE BIG SLEEP) as well as a 2017 documentary on the actors)
- Cinema Passport: Colombia (4 films)
- Today's Criterion Double Feature: The Seventh Seal / Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey
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OK, I watched How It Ends.

I really shouldn't have.

Mostly because of how it ends.

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"FYI - Altman’s 4 hour TV version of VINCENT & THEO is on Prime right now. as of @NoelMu’s 2015 Dissolve piece, it hadn’t been released in the US."

https://thedissolve.com/reviews/1475-vincent-theo/


"When The Player came out in 1992, it was greeted as a welcome comeback for director Robert Altman, who spent much of the previous decade working small—making filmed plays instead of the ambitious, character-heavy genre reinventions he’d been known for in the 1970s. But Altman actually reclaimed his critics’ darling status two years earlier with Vincent & Theo, a luminous biopic about painter Vincent Van Gogh (played by Tim Roth) and his art-dealer brother (Paul Rhys). Unlike The Player, Vincent & Theo doesn’t have the teeming cast or overlapping dialogue that were hallmarks of Altman classics like M*A*S*H and Nashville. But compared to the limited sets and light population of 1980s Altmans like Fool For Love and Secret Honor, the decade-spanning, multi-location Vincent & Theo feels refreshingly full. The film made inroads into arthouses—representing the first significant distribution for an Altman project since 1980’s Popeye—and it served as a kind of overture for the themes Altman returned to in his later years.

Originally shot as a four-hour TV miniseries, then cut almost in half for theaters, Vincent & Theo covers most of Van Gogh’s professional life, from the moment at age 29 when he told his brother that he was going to become a painter, to his death by his own hand at age 37. (Theo’s death from syphilis a few months later serves as a coda.) The film opens with one of Altman’s most inspired sequences, taking documentary footage of a Christie’s auction where one of Van Gogh’s paintings sold for millions, then running the audio from that sale faintly under a scene of Vincent living in squalor. For the next two hours, Altman and screenwriter Julian Mitchell contrast Theo’s life—which mostly consists of him guiding rich people through galleries and selling them paintings he despises—with Vincent’s gradual development of his own voice and style, through hard physical labor. Vincent & Theo also shows both men as warped by a similar madness, torn between their lusts for sex and alcohol, and their yearnings for social respectability and religious connection."


The “Theo” half of Vincent & Theo is decidedly weaker than the “Vincent” parts, primarily because Rhys’ performance is abrasively anxious, while Roth’s magnetism overcomes even his character’s rotting teeth and paint-spattered clothes. There’s a looseness to the film, typical of Altman, that sometimes makes its narrative sprawl feel like a lack of focus. Vincent & Theo is more interested in physical spaces and interior lives than in serving as a proper biography, so while it includes the major pieces of the Van Gogh story—his friendship/rivalry/obsession with Paul Gauguin, his relationships with prostitutes, his severing of his own ear, his earnest attempt to improve his mental and spiritual health, and him shooting himself in the chest—the movie tends to treat these as no more or less important than the scenes of Theo trying to be an upstanding family man for his wife Johanna (played by The Vanishing’s Johanna ter Steege), or of Vincent roaming from brothels to cow-pastures in a drunken stupor, struggling to transfer the vivid colors of nature to the drabness of his pauper’s quarters.

Vincent & Theo is less chatty than Altman’s best-known work, but it does bear some similarities to his quieter, more experimental 1970s films like Images and 3 Women. (Gabriel Yared’s discordant score is especially reminiscent of Altman’s more aggressively arty movies.) Visually, Vincent & Theo makes excellent use of Altman’s restless camera, zooming in and out on scenes to catch the little details of human behavior and natural wonder that captivated Van Gogh. The film dwells on women scratching themselves, and the wonderfully ordered chaos of a wheat field. And throughout, it shows canvases that would one day be worth a fortune being kicked around like used furniture. Altman’s production-designer son Stephen—the unsung hero of his later films—could almost be credited as the co-author of Vincent & Theo for how well he recreates late-19th-century Europe in both its tactile grime and its old world quaintness. The Altmans bring Van Gogh’s subjects back to life.

In the wake of The Player, Altman returned to directing films more like the ones he was known for, some sublime (Short Cuts) and some ridiculous (Prêt-À-Porter). But he also followed up on Vincent & Theo’s mature exploration of art, in A Prairie Home Companion, The Company, and parts of Kansas City. And Altman’s earlier Nashville and A Perfect Couple share some of the same fascination with how professional artists make something out of nothing. In many ways, Vincent & Theo is more of a linchpin in Altman’s filmography than The Player, because it’s one of his most direct engagements with what ended up being a careerlong fascination with the creative process. When Gauguin teaches Van Gogh a lesson in composition by assembling a perfect plate of Caprese salad, or when Vincent smears paint on the face of one of his favorite tavern girls, Vincent & Theo masterfully illustrates the way artists enjoy the power to transform real life into a thing of beauty."
 


"Some people never go crazy. What truly horrible lives they must lead."


"We're not gonna make it, are we? People, I mean.

"It's in your nature to destroy yourselves."
 
"Yeah. Major drag, huh?."


"Mind if I do a J?"

 








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Filmstruck Friday:

Movie of the Week: ARSENIC AND OLD LACE
Star of the Week: Max Von Sydow (16 films, including his work with Bergman, THE EXORCIST and STRANGE BREW)
Director of the Week: Peter Hyams (including OUTLAND, 2010 and CAPRICORN ONE)
The Cinematography of John Alcott (including CLOCKWORK ORANGE, BARRY LYNDON and GREYSTOKE: THE LEGEND OF TARZAN)
"Hitler's Hollywood" (a documentary on film production during the Third Reich, as well as works by Reifenstahl and films produced by the Nazi regime, including TITANIC (!) )
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Filmstruck Friday:

- Film of the Week: Pride and Prejudice (1940)
- Director of the Week: William Wellman (20 films)
- Star of the Week: Frank Sinatra (20 films)
- Emerging Filmmaker: Jim Cummings
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A show called Insatiable arrived on Netflix today, and it's getting a backlash over "body-shaming" and "triggering" and assorted other eyerolling-yet-well-intentioned adjectives - https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-f...ys-1133787

The pop-up trailer (which I hate, by the way... PLEASE STOP DOING THIS NETFLIX) seemed kind of awful to me, but there's one line in this article that should be a huge red flag:

Quote:Creator Lauren Gussis, an eight-season veteran of Showtime's Dexter,

ohhhh no.
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(08-10-2018, 02:47 PM)Mangy Wrote: A show called Insatiable arrived on Netflix today, and it's getting a backlash over "body-shaming" and "triggering" and assorted other eyerolling-yet-well-intentioned adjectives - https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-f...ys-1133787

The pop-up trailer (which I hate, by the way... PLEASE STOP DOING THIS NETFLIX) seemed kind of awful to me, but there's one line in this article that should be a huge red flag:

Quote:Creator Lauren Gussis, an eight-season veteran of Showtime's Dexter,

ohhhh no.

Yeah I heard about this. Between this and I feel Pretty....oh boy it's been fun.
“I call upon you to stop this musical now,” she said to the board. “You tear a community apart if you don’t.” -Prachi Ruina                                                            
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HOSTILES is now up.
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Watched two Netflix originals over the weekend...

To All the Boys I Loved Before is a fairly standard teen rom-com elevated by a bunch of really winning performances and some good writing.  It's just one of those movies where everyone (well, aside from the designated mean girl) is just so nice, you want things to end up well for them.

Extinction starts of making you think it's a pseudo-They Live hidden invasion kind of story, then curveballs a pretty huge twist at you about two-thirds of the way through that maybe belongs in a slightly better move.  The twist elevates it from meh to not bad for me.  And hey, How It Ends, this is how you do an unresolved ending that's still satisfying.
My karmic debt must be huge.

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My blog: An Embarrassment of Rich's
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Wow, a new Jeremy Saulnier joint around the corner!




 


"Some people never go crazy. What truly horrible lives they must lead."


"We're not gonna make it, are we? People, I mean.

"It's in your nature to destroy yourselves."
 
"Yeah. Major drag, huh?."


"Mind if I do a J?"

 








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Filmstruck Friday:

- TCM Select Movie of the Week: "North by Northwest"
- Star of the Week: Cary Grant (13 films)
- Director of the Week: Michael Crichton (4 films, including WESTWORLD, COMA and THE GREAT TRAIN ROBBERY)
- Theme: "Double Takes" (actors playing dual roles . . . 9 films, including DEAD RINGERS!)
- Theme: "The Soviet Perspective of WW2" (5 films, including THE CRANES ARE FLYING and COME AND SEE)
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(08-20-2018, 10:40 AM)Richard Dickson Wrote: To All the Boys I Loved Before is a fairly standard teen rom-com elevated by a bunch of really winning performances and some good writing.  It's just one of those movies where everyone (well, aside from the designated mean girl) is just so nice, you want things to end up well for them.

My younger daughter (21 YO) has watched this at least three times in the past week and is pretty obsessed with it.

Based on that and your recommendation (since we're about the same age and all), I plan on checking it out.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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(08-17-2018, 10:19 AM)Alt-molt Wrote: HOSTILES is now up.

Just watched this and thought it was fantastic.  How did this get overlooked last year?
My karmic debt must be huge.

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My blog: An Embarrassment of Rich's
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Filmstruck Friday! This looks like a pretty quirky week, including:

TCM Select Movie of the Week: "Captains Courageous"
Star of the Week: Paul Newman (14 films, from "Somebody Up There Likes Me" to "The Hudsucker Proxy")
Director of the Week: Alejandro Jodorowsky (5 films, including El Topo and The Holy Mountain)
Theme: Behind the Music (3 music mockumentaries: Spinal Tap, Mighty Wind and Fear of a Black Hat (!) )
Theme: Movies for Math Lovers (4 films, including Pi)
Theme: Cartoon Roots (15 animated shorts from 1907-1932)

EDIT: I forgot the two new Criterion Channel things:

- Friday Double Feature: Some Like it Hot / Insignificance
- New Criterion Edition of the Week: "Army of Shadows"
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Very excited about the Jodorowsky films.
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(08-25-2018, 03:32 PM)Richard Dickson Wrote:
(08-17-2018, 10:19 AM)Alt-molt Wrote: HOSTILES is now up.

Just watched this and thought it was fantastic.  How did this get overlooked last year?

Think it was mainly because it was released by Byron Allen's new studio and they aren't quite there yet in generating buzz for their films. It did alright business-wise, by western standards at least, but it never got much end of the year heat.
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"Horror fans: Check out #Ghoul on Netflix: supernatural horror from India set in a dystopian future. It's billed as a mini-series but would be best in one sitting. And a woman lead! "

https://twitter.com/TananariveDue/status...3877250048

"Ghoul is my favorite streaming horror discovery since The Girl with All the Gifts. (And if you haven't seen that, now is the time.) Newcomer @sennialn holds her own with Oscar nominee Glenn Close. (On Amazon, YouTube.) Similar imprisonment themes."

"To clarify, #Ghoul is on Netflix, based in India, starring Radhika Apte.
The Girl with All the Gifts is on Amazon and YouTube, starring Sennia Nanua and Glenn Close. Both are good. Both are driven by women. Both have social issues woven into the storytelling."
 


"Some people never go crazy. What truly horrible lives they must lead."


"We're not gonna make it, are we? People, I mean.

"It's in your nature to destroy yourselves."
 
"Yeah. Major drag, huh?."


"Mind if I do a J?"

 








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I've also heard good things about Ghoul, just haven't taken the time to check it out.

I'll have to watch both of them.
My PSN ID - electrichead72-----------------------------------------I'm not dumb! I'm smart! and I want respect!
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Head's Up: Jeremy Saulnier's first film MURDER PARTY is up. A bit different from his later stuff, but I love it. Blackly funny and delightfully nasty.
 


"Some people never go crazy. What truly horrible lives they must lead."


"We're not gonna make it, are we? People, I mean.

"It's in your nature to destroy yourselves."
 
"Yeah. Major drag, huh?."


"Mind if I do a J?"

 








Reply
Filmstruck Friday:

- TCM Film of the Week: "The Shop Around the Corner"
- Star of the Week: Julie Christie (9 films, including MCCABE & MRS. MILLER)
- Director of the Week: Ernst Lubitsch (14 films...Lubitsch is one of my blind spots (save, coincidentally, for "Shop Around the Corner") so I'm pretty excited)
- Telluride Guest Director Jonathan Lethem programs 6 films - ODD MAN OUT, STROSZEK (!), LETTER NEVER SENT (really great), THE HIDDEN FORTRESS, LA COLLECTIONNEUSE and MIKEY AND NICKY

EDIT: I always forget the Criterion stuff:

- Friday Double Feature - "Barry Lyndon / Tom Jones"
- Criterion Blu of the Week - "Dead Man"
- Adventures in Filmgoing with Paul Feig (6 films, including RASHOMON, WHAT'S UP DOC and PLAYTIME)
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Filmstruck Friday:

TCM Film of the Week: "The Yearling"
Star of the Week: Debbie Reynolds (12 films, including SINGIN' IN THE RAIN and THE UNSINKABLE MOLLY BROWN)
Director of the Week: H.C. Potter (9 films, including MR. BLANDINGS BUILDS HIS DREAM HOUSE)
Theme: "Nordic Noir" (Element of Crime/Insomnia/The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo Trilogy)
Theme: "Moments of Truth: The Best of Cinema Verite" (now this looks AWESOME. 10 films, including CHRONICLE OF A SUMMER, PORTRAIT OF JASON, and several works by the Maysles)
Criterion Friday Double Feature: THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN ARM / PALE FLOWER

Just learned that THE WORLD'S GREATEST SINNER is now on Amazon Prime. Looks like my Friday night plans have been decided.
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Mother! is up on Amazon Prime.
“I call upon you to stop this musical now,” she said to the board. “You tear a community apart if you don’t.” -Prachi Ruina                                                            
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Watched the first two episodes of Maniac last night, liking it a lot so far. Much funnier than the previews led me to believe.

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Netflix's October lineup: https://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2...ign=180927
“That which doesn't kill you wasn't done right.”—Khaya Dlanga
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Filmstruck Friday!

TCM Select Movie of the Week: "Random Harvest" (1942) (I've never even heard of this one!)
Director of the Week: Roberto Rosselini (23 films! Including ROME OPEN CITY, GERMANY YEAR ZERO and JOURNEY TO ITALY)
Star of the Week: Greer Garson (16 films, including GOODBYE MR. CHIPS and MRS. MINIVER)
Cinema Passport - Taiwan (5 films: A TOUCH OF ZEN, A BRIGHTER SUMMER DAY, YI YI, MIAO MIAO and EAT DRINK MAN WOMAN)
Theme: Outbreaks (Epidemic-themed films, including THE SEVENTH SEAL, THE DEVILS (!) and THE OMEGA MAN)
Criterion Friday Double Feature - FOX AND HIS FRIENDS / MULTIPLE MANIACS

EDIT: Also, Jeremy Saulnier's new movie, HOLD THE DARK, is now on Netflix.
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Whoa, The Devils!
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Another rare X-rated gem is now on Amazon Prime: the original cut of Robocop! https://bloody-disgusting.com/movie/3524...t-robocop/
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Filmstruck Friday:

- TCM Select Movie of the Week: "The Great Escape"
- Star of the Week: Steve McQueen (10 films from 1958-1973)
- Director of the Week: Mike Newell (5 films, including FOUR WEDDINGS AND A FUNERAL and DONNIE BRASCO)
- The 3 previous versions of "A Star Is Born," along with an extended interview with Bradley Cooper
- Criterion Double Feature: MCCABE & MRS. MILLER / DEAD MAN (ooooo!)
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If you’re looking for something light to relax and unwind with, Paul Greengrass’ 22 JULY is now up.
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It looks like the Criterion Channel is posting the original KING KONG tomorrow, along with a rare alternate commentary track.
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(10-11-2018, 11:09 AM)Mangy Wrote: It looks like the Criterion Channel is posting the original KING KONG tomorrow, along with a rare alternate commentary track.

Correction: This is actually the TCM Select movie of the week.

Filmstruck Friday!

TCM Select - "King Kong"
Director of the week: Jerry Schatzberg (4 films including SCARECROW, HONEYSUCKLE ROSE and STREET SMART)
Star of the Week: Lon Chaney (15 films, including PHANTOM OF THE OPERA, THE UNKNOWN and a '96 documentary about the man)
Theme: "The Young and the Restless" (5 films including QUADROPHENIA, TRAINSPOTTING and LA HAINE)
Spotlight: Women Directors (A new series updated every Friday, showcasing female filmmakers throughout history. This opening selection includes dozens of films)
Criterion Friday Night Double Feature: SEVEN SAMURAI/THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN
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