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current reading & recommendations
AThat Tucker dialogue. Pretty much nailed it.

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Read Ellis' Ocean as well. With a bit of rejigging that would make a great Dr Who 2 parter. Want Ellis to script a Who, now.
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AEllis is currently doing great work with James Bond, rejuvenating a character who once again seemed in danger of fading into irrelevance.

Vargr was a brisk, exciting, and smart introduction. So far, Eidolon is even better.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post

Ellis is currently doing great work with James Bond, rejuvenating a character who once again seemed in danger of fading into irrelevance.

Vargr was a brisk, exciting, and smart introduction. So far, Eidolon is even better.

 Good to hear.  I loved Vargr.

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This week:



Preacher vols 4 - 9


League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Vol 2 and The Black Dossier

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AAs a lifelong War of the Worlds fanatic I am absolutely loving LoEG vol 2.

First pic of a fighting machine is beautiful.

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Been reading the classic Nixon Agnosites. Everyone knows Tom Wolfe and Hunter Thompson from The New Journalists, but Gary Wills was on par with them.



Here he tracks the 1968 Campaign and aftermath, pointing out (among many other things) that while the Democratic Convention in Chicago got all the attention as an Apocalyptic event, it was the GOP convention in Miami where 3 people got killed (no one died in Chicago), and that is likely due to the facts that 1) Journalists got the shit beat of them at Chicago and 2) Blacks were the majority of protesters, and victims, in Miami.



There's lots more of course; Wills spent some time with Nixon and other politicians of that time, and offers some great character studies. The later half of the book bogs down as Wills tries to inject Deep Thoughts On The American Experiment, but the first half is straight up Journalism of a high caliber.



Wills subsequently became a Stereotype of the self consciously contrarian Academic Intellectual (he stopped going out into the world and now just deconstructs speeches and texts), but back in the day he was truly an Original.

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I recently cleared out my podcast list and looked for some worthy replacements.  I had no idea that there was a 2000 AD podcast, and a pretty damn good one!  The 2000 AD Thrill-Cast.  Well-written and produced, made by people with no moral axe to grind but love and understand Dredd and the other 2000 AD creations deeply.



The guests include not only those you would expect, like John Wagner and Pat Mills and other writers and artists, but hard-core 2000 AD/Dredd fans like director Ben Wheatley.



Highly recommended - for 2000 AD fans.



http://2000adthrillcast.podomatic.com/

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Ahttps://londonhollywood.wordpress.com/2016/09/22/if-you-read-only-one-alan-moore-jerusalem-interview-make-it-this-one/
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AThis week:

Decided to go down the Hellblazer path, so got the first 3 vols out.

Ellis' Orbiter

Nemo - Heart of Ice
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Tomasi's Superman has quietly turned into one of the biggest highlights of DC Rebirth, and this week's issue - Escape from Dinosaur Island - was an incredibly lovely tribute to Darwyn Cooke and The New Frontier. Worth checking out, including for the Doug Mahnke artwork.

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AThis week:

Hellblazer : Family Man. Wasnt too impressed with the first 2 Hellblazer collections, but the Fear Machine was great, so trudging on.

More Moore:

Complete Future Shocks
Fashion Beast
Tomorrow Stories
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AI found Mike Carey's run, while less iconic, to be the best of the Hellblazer run. Very well written - he nails all the characters - and it is strongly plotted, unsurprising given his career as a novelist.

Spoilers - The ending to that run is a heartbreaker.
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Just finished the first trade of CHILLING ADVENTURES OF SABRINA. Fantastic stuff. 

Next up is probably FATALE VOL. 2 and finally reading the last two trades of SANDMAN, so I can finish that series after 15 years trying.

home taping is killing music
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AUnimpressed with Hellblazer: Family Man, and the library didn't have all of Carey's run so given HBlazer the flick.

Fasion Beast and Future Shocks were great but tomorrow stories was a little too on the nose meta commentary.

Have started getting 2000ad weekly again (NZ is 10 weeks behind though so cant listen to the Thrillcast). Have been massively impressed with Scarlet Traces so imagine my joy when I found these at the library

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And it ticks my WotW infatuation!
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Catching up on the current run of Astro City. There's nothing quite like the joy of this series of catching up with even one-off characters from the original run (e.g., seeing what Marta - the POV character who introduced Shadow Hill in the original six-issue miniseries - is up to nowadays, having aged in real time since then).



When Astro City is on, there really is nothing else like it. Busiek's love of superheroes and optimism just bleeds through. And the world he creates is so vital that it's just wonderful to check in with Samaritan, or Steeljack, or Crackerjack and Quarrel, or discover the stories of Beautie and American Chibi after their initial joke introductions, or see another adventure of The Hanged Man, or see the really cool "sentient music" being that protects Astro City by taking a form of the popular music of the time.



Barring a miracle, it'll never top The Nearness of You (one of the five or so finest single issues of any comic ever written IMO, and maybe the most moving), and the Confessor arc is still a high watermark for its longform storytelling, but it's just great that this series is still going strong nowadays.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Dent6084 View Post
 

... and American Chibi...



Nooj is a superhero now?

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Lucked into getting all 20 volumes (!) so I guess be dwelling amongst the mutant scum of Mega City One for the next little while. I've read bits and pieces of Dredd over the years but to read it from the beginning is a real treat.

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Garth Ennis on Steve Dillon's passing.



Quote:

Steve liked a drink or two, and if the truth be told that’s how most of us knew him. Or it might be more accurate to say that Steve liked the pub, because that’s where you go to meet up with people, and Steve loved people. He found them endlessly interesting, he was happy to talk to anyone.



Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon, about 15 years ago. Photo courtesy Garth Ennis

Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon, about 15 years ago. Photo Courtesy Garth Ennis



He changed my life in a couple of ways. The first was with a phone call, somewhere towards the end of ’91: “All right, mate, I’m thinking of heading over to New York in the new year, maybe for a long weekend. Fancy it?” The second was with two decades plus of brilliant artistic collaboration, where he took whatever lunacy I threw at him and made it work flawlessly, every single time.



We met in London in the summer of ’89, but it was about a year later in Dublin that something audibly clicked. After everyone else had passed out, we sat up ‘til dawn and killed off a bottle of Jameson, talking about what we wanted to do in comics- what we thought could be done with them, what the medium was for. I can recall a sort of mutual “Oh yes, you. You’re the one. You get it.” This was to pay off handsomely in the years to come.



The last time I saw Steve was late last Saturday night in New York, walking down fifth avenue to his hotel after saying goodnight outside Foley’s. It could have been the end of any one of a thousand nights. It’s not a bad last memory to have. Steve was best man at my wedding and my good and dear friend. I think he probably taught me more about what that word means than anyone else.



I drank with Steve Dillon from Dublin to Belfast, from London to Glasgow, from San Francisco to New York City. I have not one single complaint. Cheers, mate.



— Garth Ennis


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So you guys know Mario Puzo, the guy who wrote the novel The Godfather? (reportedly he wrote it in the basement of his house in Connecticutt to pay off soem gambling debts).



Well I recently finished "Fools Die", about Gambling in Vegas and life in general.



It's certainly Pop Lit, but you can really feel Puzo stretching for that Literary credibility that he didn't really get from Godfather (he did get an Oscar for the screenplay though).



It's a good read, though the middle of the novel (when the protagonist is part of a boring Fraud against the Army, then goes to Hollywood) is a slog. The bookends in Las Vegas are dynamite.



Now reading "The Fourth K", a real trash pulp novel that posits a Kennedy nephew becoming President in the 1992 election (the novel came out in 1990).



I'm only one chapter in, but so far I've been introduced to the titular Kennedy asking his advisors why he shouldn't resign after 1 term, Italian Communist Terrorists masturbating each other as they gear up to murder The Pope, and President Kennedy's nubile daughter and the commercial airliner she's one getting hijacked.

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Oops, posted in the wrong thread!

home taping is killing music
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I'm not really a nostalgia kind of guy, but recently Dan Jurgens has brought back the "original" Superman (the 1986-2011 version), revealing that he and Lois have been hiding in the New 52 all along. So when the New 52 Superman and Lois die, and may have been clones created by Watchmen's Ozymandias (Jesus God, so complicated), the post-Crisis Superman and Lois, now with a son, basically resume their old lives and...I kind of love it?



DC has concurrently started releasing Jurgens's '90s work on the Justice League, when Superman joined up with the "bwa wa wa" crowd, along with re-releases of the Death through Return run, and it's really made me realize that's my Superman. That's the era I most strongly associate the character with, so the fact that he's alive and kicking as written by Jurgens pleases me to no end.



It's unfortunate he's surrounded by whatever ridiculous complications are going on right now at DC with Rebirth and Wally West and Doctor Manhattan and all that. Over in the Batman comics, by Tom King and Scott Snyder, Batman just goes on adventures that could basically be a continuation of the story that's been going on since the Denny O'Neill days. So why do Superman comics always need to be about alternate Earths and re-jiggering the Kryton origin? Sigh.

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ANot just Jurgens, but Tomasi is killing it in the main Superman title as well. Ol' Supes is one of the characters best served by Rebirth.
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AChristmas pressie from the wife

Very happy Smile

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ABirthday pressie

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It hit me about half way through, that one of the characters who goes on to become a cadet (at about age 6) had a familiar name. Then I realised it was Judge Beeny, recently graduated cadet who I'd read about in the recent Tour of Duty/Day of Judgement series.

Mind blown at the awesomeness that is 40 years of "real time" Judge Dredd. 40 years of world building, character growth, continuing stories. No reboots that stop this timeline (the IDW stuff has no impact on it and is in fact great in its own way). Just continuing greatness.

What with this and Dr Who the brits sure as hell know how to do long term sci-fi.
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Latest arc of Superman is a straight up sequel to Morrison's Superman Beyond/Final Crisis/Action Comics/Multiversity saga and it is extremely my shit. Tomasi edited a lot of that stuff, so it doesn't feel so out of step. I like Action too, and the Superman line as a whole is in pretty damn good shape right now.



The only other book I can afford to follow is Green Arrow, and right now that book is doing some pretty upper echelon stuff. A lot of great possibilities for that character.

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I'm starting to think I'm the only Chewer not reading comics or graphic novels exclusively Smile



Recently read Brian Aldiss's Dracula Unbound, the sequel to Frankenstein Unbound.



the later novel was published in the 60's-70's and reflected the New Wave phenonenom of that time. I read it years ago and recall it was tough to get through. Roger Cormen made a film of the novel with John Hurt starring. Both were pretty incoherent.



THIS novel apes the action adventure/horror vibe of Bran Stoker's novel, with the advantage of having Bran Stoker in it!



In this novel Dracula has mastered time travel to gather all vampires for a gathering at both the end of time (when the Sun is dying) and the Pre Cambrian Era to conquer Humanity.



If I understood Higher Mathematics better I could give a better review.



Suffice it to say, the narrative and characters are worth a read. And if you DO get higher math please explain the Time Travel Train to me! It's great as a narrative (and Spooky) device. If there is a basis in SCIENCE I'd love to know!

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Quote:

Originally Posted by D.S. Randlett View Post
 

Latest arc of Superman is a straight up sequel to Morrison's Superman Beyond/Final Crisis/Action Comics/Multiversity saga and it is extremely my shit. Tomasi edited a lot of that stuff, so it doesn't feel so out of step. I like Action too, and the Superman line as a whole is in pretty damn good shape right now.



The only other book I can afford to follow is Green Arrow, and right now that book is doing some pretty upper echelon stuff. A lot of great possibilities for that character.


Tomasi's Superman has been a joy. Would probably be my favorite superhero comic of last year, if not for the greatness that was Tom King's The Vision.

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AJust read all of Brubaker's VELVET.

Pretty brisk, exciting read.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post

Just read all of Brubaker's VELVET.

Pretty brisk, exciting read.


This is a concept and  a writer that is tailor made for me, but I couldn't get into it! 


This weekend, I read: 

Hellraiser Vol. 1 - pretty good - a little cheap with all the child death, but nobody gets under my skin like Barker, and this was pretty excellent epic horror
Bitch Planet Vol. 1 - A most excellent work of fully realized SF that deserves to stand alongside the Handmaid's Tale. Also, it makes me want to watch Rollerball again.
Princess Leia Vol. 1 - I really enjoyed this, my first sojurn into the new Marvel Star Wars comics. Particularly after her death, Leia the character and Carrie Fisher the performer have kind of been conflated in a lot of people's minds, and I thought this did a great job of once again separating the two. It really feels like a Leia origin story.



I was impressed by the general quality of the Star Wars comics enough that I picked up the first volume of Darth Vader and their Lando trade.

home taping is killing music
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Based on the Rebirth issue, Steve Orlando's JLA is probably going to be the best Justice League title in years (I lasted two issues on the current Hitch run on Justice League - so, so boring). It's just getting the team together, but he nails every character's voice and sets up a number of interesting dynamics and relationships (his take on Lobo is clearly going to be a scene-stealer, especially since it's not that godawaful Nu52 Lobo but the original one). He's been absolutely killing it on Midnighter and Midnighter & Apollo, so psyched to see him get this much bigger canvas.



Also, no Cyborg.

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ATrees vol2 by Ellis & Howard.

There's always at least one page in a Warren Ellis written book that haunts me.

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Been catching up on the new run of Astro City. It's some fun inventive stuff for sure (today's issue w/ G-Dog is adorable and looks to kick off a heartbreaking-for-dog-owners issue next month), but my jaw hit the floor when I read in an interview today that Issue #50 of the current run is going to kick off a three-part sequel story to The Nearness of You:



https://twitter.com/Newsarama/status/905563292025987072



Forget Doomsday Clock, Legacy, or even Busiek himself finally doing the Batman-themed "follow-up"/thematic sequel to Superman: Secret Identity - this is simultaneously the most exciting and terrifying comics sequel to a beloved classic this fall. I mean... that bar is astronomically high. Nearness of You is maybe one of the top 10 single issue stories in any comic ever. Busiek must have a rock-solid concept to be committing to this, but still, holy shit.

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There's a slew of recent and classic Marvel comics being offered for free until May on the Marvel Unlimited reader app and webpage. Today I dove into some Thanos and Spider-Man, and Fantastic Four story arcs from recent years that I hadn't known about. Classic stories on the free page include the Dark Phoenix saga, the Kree/Skrull War, and the return of Bucky as the Winter Soldier.
Please consider lending a hand if you can, or posting my gofundme link elsewhere in Social Media Land.

http://citizens.trouble.city/showthread.php?tid=162311&pid=4721386#pid4721386
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My daughter has been watching Supergirl for a while now, and has expressed interest in reading the comics. Are there any writers or collections you guys would recommend to start with?
If I could change to liquid, I'd fill the cracks and bend the rocks.
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