Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Depression
#1

Such a motherfucker.

Reply
#2

Seriously. Condolences and good thoughts for you Mr.Merriweather.

Reply
#3

Tell me about it.

But on the flip-side, Pills: so fucking awesome.

I might have been born yesterday sir, but I stayed up all night!
Reply
#4

Yup. When it comes to depression, going to a doctor and getting some medication cannot be overestimated. It's ridiculous how much proper treatment helps.

Reply
#5

Oh, I have the little magic things. Just having a down day.

Reply
#6

You went into the spider-cricket thread, didn't you?

I might have been born yesterday sir, but I stayed up all night!
Reply
#7

;__;

Reply
#8

sorry to hear that, mate.

hope you´re feeling a bit better by now... just don´t let it get to you. I went through a serious bout of this last year, lost about 14kg (28 pounds, give or take), but got treated and now I´m doing great.

we´re here for you, man!

cheers!

Reply
#9

It's been five months now. I haven't had the money to seek treatment, though I have seen random free support suppliers. When I was younger I thought I knew how it felt, but I had no idea. It's like your heart has a bottom floor, and you only feel it during depression because you sense it completely fall down an elevator shaft. Almost nothing makes me smile anymore.

Get well, Andrew.

Reply
#10

It's something I've been living with for a looong time - the shitty days just ebb and flow like the tide. I can't believe the state of mental healthcare in the U.S. This is the primary issue that the Democrats should be hammering healthcare opponents with. Forget broken legs and whatnot for a second - there is no strong, stable, well-funded system in place to help anybody suffering from mental illness. Unbelievable.

Reply
#11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Merriweather View Post

It's something I've been living with for a looong time - the shitty days just ebb and flow like the tide. I can't believe the state of mental healthcare in the U.S. This is the primary issue that the Democrats should be hammering healthcare opponents with. Forget broken legs and whatnot for a second - there is no strong, stable, well-funded system in place to help anybody suffering from mental illness. Unbelievable.

Might be a lost cause. Convincing politicians that something that's always been around is actually a problem is impossible, given the fact that they toss words around like "entitlements." God knows I have a hard enough time convincing the people around me that what I feel is a genuine condition.

Reply
#12
AFor some weird reason even though a number of other mental illnesses have been popularly accepted as such, depression seems to still be widely considered as something that you can grind your teeth and get through. Which, once you see someone close to you both suffer and then get better with proper treatment, is complete bullshit.
Reply
#13

I had a running diagnosis of chronic depression for 12 years. I know how it feels, and I'm so sorry, man. Best of luck to you, and stelios is right: medication helps a lot.

I'm proud of myself for working through it without medication, but I'll be the first to say it's a fluke, and look how long it took going without. I still struggle with it from time to time, but I've found that meditation helps a lot. It's not for everyone, obviously, but hey.

Reply
#14
APills are fine and dandy, but until we fully understand just what they are doing to our brain chemistry over time, I would consider them a last resort.

One of the main problems with depression is that is feeds on itself, sapping your energy and making you feel inert. I have seen people in these "ruts" that last for months, if not years. It sounds like you're just having a down day, which is a different beast entirely, but if you are ever in the downward spiral, it is vitally important to try to take ONE small step to change your daily routine. It doesn't need to cost anything. Go to a library, volunteer somewhere, call a help line, but DO something different. Small, incremental steps can help tremendously.
Reply
#15


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron W View Post

Pills are fine and dandy, but until we fully understand just what they are doing to our brain chemistry over time, I would consider them a last resort.

One of the main problems with depression is that is feeds on itself, sapping your energy and making you feel inert. I have seen people in these "ruts" that last for months, if not years. It sounds like you're just having a down day, which is a different beast entirely, but if you are ever in the downward spiral, it is vitally important to try to take ONE small step to change your daily routine. It doesn't need to cost anything. Go to a library, volunteer somewhere, call a help line, but DO something different. Small, incremental steps can help tremendously.


Yeah, unless your speaking from own personal experience with depression, this is a pretty tangential grasp of the problem. You speak as if resolving the underlying issue is a matter of will. It isn't. You really think people who are dealing with this problem aren't trying, incrementally, to function normally to the best of their abilities every day?

Granted, diagnosable depression is wide spectrum of varying severities & I can't speak to the individual cases you've had contact with. But I've been wrestling with 'severe clinical depression' since the age of 10. After years of denying the problem (while still suffering the effects of it) & doing everything I could to retain daily normality, the only thing that allowed to me any sort of positive traction was meds. Specifically, SSRI's.

In my experience, the big 'D' is akin to being stuck on the shear side of a mountain face, holding tight as much as possible by the tips of my fingers. Daily activity, work, relationships, life in general is like bellowing wind that constantly threatens to blow you off. The function of meds is to provide you with better crevices with which you can better pull yourself up the face toward functionality.

Reply
#16
AYou are absolutely correct when you say there are varying severities of the disease, and no, I don't mean to imply that any true depressive can just "get over it." My apologies for not being more clear. I would not deign to speak on the issue without having had my own personal struggle with it.

As far as meds go, in some cases they are exactly what is called for, but some people with depression approach them as quick-acting panacea, when in fact it can take months of trial and error to find the pill that will help them. The danger then is that the patient expects too much too fast and becomes even more discouraged when the treatment does not show immediate results.

My point is that depression sometimes leads us to withdraw from the world at large, and in extreme cases, from the very people who can help us most. It is a constant struggle to get up and keep moving. In a sense, I guess that aspect of it is a matter of will.
Reply
#17



Quote:
Originally Posted by Art Decade View Post



Yeah, unless your speaking from own personal experience with depression, this is a pretty tangential grasp of the problem. You speak as if resolving the underlying issue is a matter of will. It isn't. You really think people who are dealing with this problem aren't trying, incrementally, to function normally to the best of their abilities every day?

Granted, diagnosable depression is wide spectrum of varying severities & I can't speak to the individual cases you've had contact with. But I've been wrestling with 'severe clinical depression' since the age of 10. After years of denying the problem (while still suffering the effects of it) & doing everything I could to retain daily normality, the only thing that allowed to me any sort of positive traction was meds. Specifically, SSRI's.

In my experience, the big 'D' is akin to being stuck on the shear side of a mountain face, holding tight as much as possible by the tips of my fingers. Daily activity, work, relationships, life in general is like bellowing wind that constantly threatens to blow you off. The function of meds is to provide you with better crevices with which you can better pull yourself up the face toward functionality.



I have to say, I agree with you. Last year there were a couple weeks when I couldn´t even muster the energy to go to work. I only started bouncing back up when I began proper chemical treatment (read: pills). However, I don´t think pills alone do the trick. In my opinion, they are an absolutely crucial part of the treatment, but with me they were more like a way to cure the symptoms so the disease could be properly treated. But yeah, they´ve done me loads of good and still do.

Reply
#18

Was diagnosed with Major Depression in high school, and have been battling rapid cycling bipolar disorder since 2005, and its a fucking BITCH. I see both a psychiatrist and a therapist every month, and am on a few different medications. There are days where I feel fine, days where I dont want to see the sunlight I'm so depressed, and manic days. The medication I'm taking helps make the mood swings not so bad, but they still do happen.

Reply
#19

I’ve had some form of depression since I can remember, and it progressed as I got older.  I’ve been on several forms of medication, but I never stayed on them long enough for them to take effect or I’d abuse them.   About a year ago, I began having problems that I knew were beyond depression; I was eventually diagnosed as having a milder form of disorganized schizophrenia.  I was told the illness could have been brought on by years of untreated depression and anxiety.   Mental illness runs rampant in my mom’s family so I could have picked up a gene somewhere.   

Reply
#20

I'm undiagnosed and not on meds, but about 95% sure I'm bi-polar to some degree. Depression is indeed a motherfucker, and outweighs the manic to a large degree.

Problem with meds for me, is I can't take pills with any sort of regularity. I've tried pretty much everything(alarms, sticky notes, etc), but I just can't remember to take them at a scheduled time. Of all the times I've taken antibiotics, I think I've correctly taken them maybe 3 times.

Reply
#21

Mine's more of an anxiety (which can end up depressing) issue, but I (as an allergy sufferer) read this article recently that made a bit of sense...


Sad in the spring? Allergy-mood link is real


Reply
#22


Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Merriweather View Post

Such a motherfucker.



Motherfucker, motherfucker I may be but the mother I've been fucking ain't kin to me.  That cheer you up? Probably not but it's a shitty hand to be dealt and I commiserate right there with you.  I went through the same thing recently but it can and does get better. I'm not saying that will happen for you (mostly because I'm not a lying asshole) but it does happen and all things do pass eventually.

Depression is a tricky bitch goddess of gloom and there were times I honestly wanted to just drive my car to the ocean and walk out into the water but I found things that helped me overcome a bit.  I know a lot of this is biochemistry, genetics and sciency stuff but what helped me (in addition to my family and friends) was finding solace in the fact that somewhere out there was some poor, sorry bastard worse off than me and I should truly appreciate what I had in my life no matter how shitty things got or how much I seemed to fuck up things around me or myself.

Maybe that works and maybe that doesn't. Every person's gotta find their own answers eventually but you're not alone Andrew.  Good luck.

Reply
#23

If I didn't have a daughter, I probably would off myself.  I'll always feel alone and disappointed with life.

It blows to feel like your life is so inexorable.

Reply
#24

Drown yourself in what you love. That's all any of us can do.

Reply
#25


Quote:
Originally Posted by C.S. Lewis Jr. View Post

If I didn't have a daughter, I probably would off myself.  I'll always feel alone and disappointed with life.

It blows to feel like your life is so inexorable.


I don't struggle with chronic depression or other mental illness, but your first sentence really struck a chord. The low point of my life came in January,  2009, and the biggest reason I didn't walk off a 15 story roof was my daughters' faces in mind.

I've since climbed up and out, and as I said, it was a situational thing, not a constant condition. But know you're not alone, even if you feel it. Reach out. Find support groups. Find a therapist with a shitload of experience in dealing with depression and/or schizophrenia.

We want you around, man.

Reply
#26

battling this bitch at the moment.

Winston Churrchill described his as a black dog.  Mine is like a small version of me on my shoulder constatntly whispering 'you're not good enough'

fucking hate, hate, hate it.  It  brings all my insecurities to the fore which pushes my nearest and dearest away.

Reply
#27

Andy, the one on my shoulder pretty much says "YOU SUCK" all the time, then occasionally flip-flops to "YOU SIR, ARE A BADASS!".

I took a giant road trip, by myself, to get away from depression, basically. One I'm still on and has lasted about twice as long as I had planned on. Now I have a ton of debt to look forward to, yay!

Plus column? I feel great. Hopefully this isn't a short-term remedy(most likely it is), but I can't recommend a vacation of sorts enough, even if it's not everyone's cup o' tea. The new perspective you get on things when you're away from them for a while can be great. Now if only I could have stuck to my plan of not using my cell and staying off the internet, it would have gone even better, I feel.

I'm lucky though, in the sense that I'm not tied down with work or family at my "old" age(I'm 33). I realize not everyone can do something like that on a whim.

Reply
#28

Depression is something I've tangoed with for the past 9 years.  I've have a mild form that I've been able to deal with, with counseling and exervise, but the last year has been hell.  I started having strange health problems with my stomach, and due to my shitty ass health insurance I was never able to get the treatment I needed at the time.   I've also struggled with anxiety my whole life, and when my health issues started, my anxiety took off.  I started having panic attacks, and my depression got worse.  There was probably a two month period earlier this year where I couldn't leave the bedroom except for work.  I'd go to work, come home, and just lay in my bed.  Anytime I would be forced to do something, I'd have a panic attack and beleive I was dieing.  Couldn't breathe, felt like I was having a heart attack, the only thing that would make me feel fine was just laying in my bed.  Shit got so bad, that even driving to work and back would become as frightening as going off to war for me.  I'd sweat, and my heart would race.  I sometimes had to pull over 5 or 6 times just so I could get out of my car, and walk around (my job is 16 minutes from my house).  All this just added to my depression.  I would sometimes get so mad, I'd just yell at myself, telling myself to knock it the fuck off.

Finally, I sucked it up, and went to my doctor and told him about what I was dealing with.  Besides depression, I was diagnosed with GAD (generalized Anxiety Disorder).  After trying some drugs, like Lexapro and xanax (for panic attacks), I found prozac was the best solution for me.  Mixed with counseling, my depression has been brought back down to managable levels.  I still struggle with the occasional panic attack and sense of unreality, but it's not daily like it was, maybe once a month at this point.

I used to be one of the jackasses that would get annoyed when people would talk about depression and other mental illnesses.  Telling them to just suck it up, and get over it, but it is not that simple.  It's almost like a patch of quick sand, the more you kick, and struggle to get out, the more you become sucked in

Reply
#29

Yeah anxiety is a bitch and a half too. A lot of people don't understand them and think they can just be willed away. Mind over matter and all that, but it's just not the case. I got so bad a few years ago that I was in a similar state, where it crept into my daily routine(driving being the worst). Luckly they went away for a good long while but now I have them again occasionally. No idea what changed to make them go away or come back.

Tried a few drugs, but with some the side-effects were too annoying, so I ended up on valium. They do the trick 95% of the time and I don't need to stay on a set "pill(s)-a-day-at-a-certain-time" schedule, which I'm awful at.

Reply
#30

Panic Attacks are a bitch to figure out.  The best method I was taught to deal with them, is to accept it.  For the longest time, i would "fight" an attack when i felt it coming on, and that's the thing that fuels panic attacks.  By fighting it, you are releasing adrenaline, and turning your body over to the "flight or fight" response.  When you think about what a panic attack is, it's basically your body going into "flight or fight" mode, but you are unable to end it.  So fighting it, just makes it that much worse.  What I do now, when one comes on, is I'll turn on calming music, and just let it happen.  It will last 20 seconds or so, and pass.

The worst thing though, worse then panic attacks, is the sense of "unreality".  Where everything seems "unreal" to you, almost like you are walking in a dream.  Best cure for that, I found... go for a quick jog... ussualy slaps it out of my system.

I can't express how much exercise helps depression and anxiety.  It's not a cure all, but it's a big step in getting your body to where it should be. .

Reply
#31

Sorry for all your troubles, guys. Hope they clear up soon... 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NickP View Post

The worst thing though, worse then panic attacks, is the sense of "unreality".  Where everything seems "unreal" to you, almost like you are walking in a dream.  Best cure for that, I found... go for a quick jog... ussualy slaps it out of my system.

Yeah, that's called derealisation. It's actually something I've been suffering from full time for the past 5 years. Just came one day and never left. Sucked like hell but i've learned to live with it and even discovered a few advantages.

I might have been born yesterday sir, but I stayed up all night!
Reply
#32

Full time?  Give you credit man, there is no way I could handle that.  It's frustrating to the 10th degree.  Mine comes and goes..... but never lingers more then a few hours.

Reply
#33



Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexus-7 View Post

Andy, the one on my shoulder pretty much says "YOU SUCK" all the time, then occasionally flip-flops to "YOU SIR, ARE A BADASS!".



yup same for me.  Horrible.  The people that think they know me probably think I'm an arrogant twat but the people that really know me know that this is a million miles from the truth.

Dug out the skateboard in a bid to get over it but damn I'd forgotten how fit you need to be to skateboard.

At the moment my wife and kids are being legendary.  Have had some real deep chats with the wife, since my insecurities can feed hers, which helped no-end and the kids have just excelled themselves with giving their Dad the cuddles and love he needs.

Thankfully I've never suffered panic attacks, just crippling self doubts and hatred.

Reply
#34

All it took was a girl canceling a date and now I just want to jump from a tall height. I've been depression free, or close to it, for like a month, and it just came rushing back. I feel like any satisfaction I could've gained from the next few days (I'm very busy with a number of projects) just went out the fucking window. Joylessness returns.

Reply
#35


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gabe T View Post

All it took was a girl canceling a date and now I just want to jump from a tall height. I've been depression free, or close to it, for like a month, and it just came rushing back. I feel like any satisfaction I could've gained from the next few days (I'm very busy with a number of projects) just went out the fucking window. Joylessness returns.



Heh. Been there. Maybe I am there.

Girls cancelling dates is part of life. Or ignoring you, or declining to go out with you after hitting it off (these are all part of everyone's life, right?). I can pretend none of it's happening and not even care about meeting girls and just throw myself into work, but all these lingering feelings don't go away. Or it'll take just one small thing to trigger a bad memory and I'll get depressed. And most likely you'll be a guy who does that kind of thing to girls, too, and you'll have your reasons.

I'm just curious, why'd the girl cancel? Is the date cancelled or just delayed?

Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)