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The Racism & Social Injustice Catch-All
A white man from North Carolina lost his job after a video of him asking for the identification card of a black woman using a private community's cool went viral.  He also called police:

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/adam-bloom-...d=53966483

Quote:A white man who challenged a black family's use of a private community's pool has not only resigned from a homeowner's association board -- he also lost his job. Sonoco announced Friday that Adam Bloom is no longer employed by the packaging and industrial products company, saying it doesn't condone discrimination of any kind, even if it happens outside its workplace.

A video posted on the Facebook page of Jasmine Edwards on July 4, seen more than four million times, shows what happened after Bloom questioned whether she was allowed to be at the pool in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He also called police.

Bloom, Edwards and the responding officers all speak in measured tones in the video. She accuses him of singling out her and her young son as African-Americans by asking to see her ID. Bloom, who served as the chairman of the pool, responds that he asks residents to see their identification "a couple times" each week.

Officers then determined that Edwards, who lives in the neighborhood, did in fact have keycard access to the gated pool. An officer then apologized to her. When Edwards asked Bloom for an apology, he walked away.

"This is a classic case of racial profiling in my half a million $$ neighborhood pool. This happened to me and my baby today. What a shame," Edwards wrote on Facebook. "Racial profiling at its worst!"

The social media backlash was fierce, and soon targeted Bloom's employer. In a Twitter post, South Carolina-based Sonoco apologized to Edwards and said the situation doesn't reflect company values.
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No time like the present to remind people how racist senatorial candidate, Kelli Ward, is:

https://www.mediamatters.org/blog/2018/0...oup/220608

Quote:Republican Arizona Senate candidate Kelli Ward and her husband Michael Ward have been campaigning on a racist Facebook group with over 94,000 members called Tea Party that pushes conspiracy theories. The Wards are among the group’s administrators and moderators, along with some other Republican congressional candidates and extremist media figures. Some of the administrators and moderators have shared far-right conspiracy theories, fake news, and anti-Muslim, racist propaganda in the group.

A CNN KFile review of the social media activity of Kelli Ward’s husband found that Michael Ward has pushed far-right conspiracy theories on Twitter about Democratic National Committee staffer Seth Rich’s murder and the DNC’s supposed involvement in it, the Clintons’ supposed murder of their political rivals, and incumbent Republican Arizona Sen. John McCain’s alleged connections to ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. Zachary Henry, spokesperson for Kelli Ward’s campaign, called Michael’s tweets and retweets “obscure details of Dr. Ward's social media activity.”

However, since Kelli Ward’s previous Senate bid against John McCain in 2016, she and her husband have been promoting her posts in a Facebook group, Tea Party, that features conspiracy and racist content posted by other administrators and moderators.

Michael Ward regularly shares posts from his wife’s verified Facebook page to the Tea Party group. He has also previously requested donations from group members. Although most posts directly quote Kelli Ward’s social media and campaign positions, in a 2016 post, Michael Ward claimed that McCain is a supporter of the Muslim Brotherhood.
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Gov. John Bel Edwards of Louisiana, a Democrat, started off his term wanting to commute sentences.  He commuted 22 of them, but fear mongering took over soon after:

https://theappeal.org/this-red-state-gov...in-prison/

Quote:After campaigning in the deep red state on a promise to reduce its prison population, Edwards set his sights on changing Louisiana’s reputation as the incarceration capital of the nation. One of his first actions was to give relief to people like Myers serving long sentences for violent crimes. In his first six months in office, Edwards commuted 22 sentences out of 56 sent to him with positive recommendation from the state’s Board of Pardons. Sixteen of the offenders whose applications he granted were serving life without parole. 

Just a few days days before Christmas, the warden told Myers that Edwards had signed his application and had granted him immediate release. Four days later, he was home near Baton Rouge, celebrating Christmas with his mother, brother, daughter, grandchildren, and extended family. 

“It was amazing,” he said. “It was a fantastic reunion.” 

Edwards’s commutation spree stood in stark contrast to how his predecessors used their power. Neither Governor Mike Foster, a Republican, nor Kathleen Blanco, a Democrat, signed any commutations in their first year. (Foster waited almost three years to start signing pardons and commutations, but focused on nonviolent offenders.) Blanco commuted 129 sentences in four years, and Foster commuted 52 in eight years, but the majority came during their last few years in office. 

Governor Bobby Jindal, who served most recently, approved one clemency application in his first year but only three during his eight years in office. While the Pardon Board sent many applications with positive recommendations to his desk, Jindal, a Republican, ignored the vast majority. That included Myers’s, which the Pardon Board recommended in 2013.

Edwards has still made some big in-roads, though:

Quote:Criminal justice reform advocates credit Edwards for bringing long-needed change to Louisiana’s justice system—not just through his clemency push but also by spearheading a legislation package that lowered mandatory minimum sentences, expanded alternatives to prison, and made it easier for nonviolent offenders to get out of prison early. Thousands of people have since been released, and last year Louisiana lost its title as the state with the highest incarceration rate in the nation. Edwards’s renewed use of the clemency power made many of the lifers at the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola, the largest maximum-security prison in the United States, hopeful for the first time in decades. 

“I can tell you most certainly there was renewed hope,” said Andrew Hundley, the executive director of the Louisiana Parole Project. “For so long, there wasn’t hope. … There’s about 6,000 people at Angola and about 5,000 of them have life sentences or sentences akin to life sentences, so the majority of people who go to Angola won’t leave Angola.” 

But, yeah, that fear mongering...

Quote:In the last year and a half, since the end of 2016, Edwards has not signed a single commutation. The pardon board has issued at least 70 positive recommendations to people seeking commutations since December 2016, when Edwards signed his last commutation, according to an analysis by The Appeal. Representatives with his office did not respond to questions about why the commutations stopped.

Advocates like Norris Henderson, who leads the civil rights nonprofit Voice of the Experienced, say they understand why Edwards has put down his clemency pen. The governor is up for re-election next year, and they say it would be dangerous for him to do anything that could jeopardize his chances of serving another term.  

“I think he’s just being cautious,” Henderson said, pointing out that as the lone elected Democrat in Louisiana, Edwards has a long list of opponents who would capitalize on any misstep. “Some of these folks are trying to use any excuse possible to throw a brick at you.” 

“He’s doing his due diligence,” Myers agreed. “The political fallout could wreck someone who has an opportunity to do good. … You have to be there to do good.”

While his efforts have garnered praise outside the state, Henderson said it’s common knowledge in Louisiana that supporting criminal justice reform can be a politically dangerous position. Edwards is already facing pushback from the state’s district attorneys, who have said they need more time to consider each application. (E. Pete Adams, the executive director of the Louisiana District Attorneys Association, said the DAs respect the governor’s commutation authority, as long as victims and their representatives are given notice and the opportunity to be heard.) 

Two Republicans, U.S. Senator John Kennedy  and state Attorney General Jeff Landry—both considered potential opponents for Edwards in next year’s election—have already gone after the governor for being too lenient on crime, with Kennedy calling Edwards’s package of reforms an “unqualified disaster.”

If just one of individuals whose sentence Edwards commuted or who have been released were to violate their parole or get sent back to prison, Edwards’s ability to use his clemency power could be over. 

“People are looking for a Willie Horton,” Henderson said, referring to the man who was convicted of a rape and other crimes committed while on a Massachusetts weekend furlough program and may have cost the state’s governor at the time, Michael Dukakis, the 1988 presidential election. 
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Oh, man, this is bad:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post...9640c1cfef

Quote:The Los Angeles Fourth of July fireworks display was just beginning when Erik Mendoza realized his 91-year-old grandfather was missing. Thinking he might have gone for his daily walk, Mendoza wandered around the neighborhood searching for him.
What he found was a bloodstained sidewalk.

Mendoza, 22, told The Washington Post that Rodolfo Rodriguez, a permanent resident of the United States, had been attacked with a brick and taken to the hospital with a broken cheek bone and two broken ribs.

Misbel Borjas, 35, a South Los Angeles resident, saw the assault as it happened.

Traffic had slowed Borjas’s car at a corner in Willowbrook, Calif., around 7 p.m. on July 4. Rodriguez accidentally bumped into a young girl while walking on the sidewalk, Borjas told The Washington Post. Borjas watched the child’s mother push the elderly man to the ground and repeatedly bash him in the face with a concrete brick while yelling, “Go back to your country.”

“I tried to help him, but the lady said, ‘If you come over here I’ll hit your car with the same brick,’ ” recounted Borjas, who had attempted to pull over and rescue Rodirguez. Instead, Borjas photographed the mother and her child. Then she called 911.

Minutes later, however, the attack continued, Borjas said. A group of young men bounded down the street, accusing Rodriguez of trying to snatch the young girl. They kicked Rodriguez, who was already crumpled on the ground, and stomped on his head.

“ ‘Why? Why are you hitting me,’ ” Borjas recalled Rodriguez crying in Spanish. “ ‘Please get away.’ ”

Once the men fled scene, Borjas exited her car and waited with Rodriguez for the ambulance to arrive.

“It was terrible, terrible, terrible,” she said. “There was a lot of blood on his head and face. He looked like his mouth and teeth were broken.”
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This is bad too.  A white man harasses a woman who rented an area in a public park for a birthday party because she had a t-shirt of the Puerto Rican flag on; he wants to know if she's a citizen because he's really fucking stupid.  A nearby police officer refuses to do anything about it, but decides to confront the woman's brother for trying to get the man to leave.

https://twitter.com/TheRileyWilson/statu...0412404736

Hell, even Joe Scarborough went to Twitter to wonder just what type of officer this guy is.

https://twitter.com/JoeNBC/status/1016464439372124160

UPDATE: The incident took place in Cook County, Illinois on June 14, and the racist was arrested and charged with assault and disorderly conduct.  The officer has been placed on desk duty pending the outcome of an investigation:

https://twitter.com/FPDCC/status/1016443912133758981
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Very offensive picture and very NSFW (obviously), so beware of the sign this neo-Nazi was holding up in downtown Tampa today:

https://twitter.com/Kathy0727/status/101...4558035968
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A white man screamed racial slurs at a black Verizon employee because he couldn't get a new phone on his family's plan since he didn't have a PIN number or cash:

https://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/Un...56141.html

Quote:An unhappy customer was recently caught on video going on a racist tirade at a Bay Area Verizon store.

A man who who recorded the video is a manager at the Verizon store near Sanchez and Market streets in San Francisco. He claims the would-be customer in the video tried to buy a phone on his family's plan but did not have a PIN number or cash.

When the man did not get what he wanted, he went on a racist rant that spilled outside the store.

One witness who didn't want to be identified said hearing the N-word is hurtful.

"People still have that hatred in their heart for a person because of the color of their skin. I can't understand," the person said. "It hurts a lot, hurts a lot of people who see that video."

The video has been widely viewed on social media. And while it may be hurtful to many, authorities say hateful speech is not a crime.
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"They do it all around the country and you should see how they live," the woman says.

https://mashable.com/2016/06/28/teen-sel...800zEdAqqw

Quote:A kind stranger is gaining the support of thousands online after he stood up for a teenage girl who was selling candy outside of a store.

Andy Lizarraga stumbled upon the incident outside of a Target in Rowland Heights, California, where she witnessed a woman harassing a teenage girl for illegally selling candy. As the woman demanded to see the teen's license, a man, Jay Lopez, exited the store and stood up for the girl.

“She comes up to the little kid and is like, ‘Where is your license? Have you asked permission to be here?’ And then the kid is like, ‘No, I’m just selling candy. I’m trying to make some money,’ ” Lizarraga told CBS Los Angeles.

"You should be ashamed of yourself," Lopez said to the woman and offered to support the young woman."How much candy is that? I'm buying it all."

"I am not ashamed of myself I'm standing up for this young person," the woman fires back. 

"Yeah. You're really standing up for them yelling at them," Lopez says.

"They do it all around the country and you should see how they live," the woman says.

As the teen counts the candy Lopez tells the woman that she's ignorant.

"How dare you call me a racist, you have no idea," says the woman to Lopez who completely ignores her and leaves the scene to get cash. 
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Papa John's founder John Schnatter being a racist isn't exactly breaking news, but:

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/07/11/papa-joh...-word.html

Quote:Papa John's founder John Schnatter admitted to using the N-word during a May conference call and apologized for the comments after Forbes magazine detailed the incident in an article Wednesday.

“News reports attributing the use of inappropriate and hurtful language to me during a media training session regarding race are true," Schnatter said in a statement released by Papa John's. "Regardless of the context, I apologize. Simply stated, racism has no place in our society.”

Schnatter was on a call with marketing agency Laundry Service when he tried to downplay comments he made about the National Football League and allegedly said, “Colonel Sanders called blacks n-----s," and complained that the KFC founder never faced public backlash. The call was a role-playing exercise for Schnatter to prevent future public relations fumbles.

“The past six months we’ve had to take a hard look in the mirror and acknowledge that we’ve lost a bit of focus on the core values that this brand was built on and that delivered success for so many years,” CEO Steve Ritchie said in an internal memo obtained by CNBC that was sent Wednesday to team members, franchisees and operators. "We’ve got to own up and take the hit for our missteps and refocus on the constant pursuit of better that is the DNA of our brand.”
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" *I* used the N-word. MY racism has no place in society. MY pizza sucks."

Fixed that for ya, John.
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Resting before going to your yoga class?  Better think twice, apparently:

https://www.foxla.com/news/local-news/ma...long-beach

Quote:A man told his story about an experience he described as racial profiling in a neighborhood where he was parked in his car.

Ezekiel Phillips said if he weren’t black, a white woman would have never felt threatened by his presence.

“You don’t have to call 911 on me. Talk to me. Ask me my name,” Phillips said.

Phillips had just dropped someone off near 1470 Ramillo Avenue in Long Beach and decided to take a 30-minute break before going to his yoga class, which was around the corner.

He was listening to his bikram yoga CD in when a woman walked up to his car.

“You’re not supposed to be here. This is a good neighborhood. At that moment I’m like, ‘wait hold up’. Have a good day ma’am. Namaste. And I rolled my window up,” he told FOX 11 reporter, Leah Uko.

The verbal exchange escalated from there.

“She took her phone out; started taking pictures, filming doing whatever she was doing. Hey I went to film school. I can take film as well. So I got out the car, I started filming her as soon as I start filming her, ‘what are you doing?’ Leave me alone! I’m feeling threatened. Help! Help!’ It was one of those.”

The woman called for Long Beach police to come to her street.

In the 911 audio obtained by FOX 11, the woman is heard addressing the operator.

“I noticed him two houses up from my parents’ house and I’m like, you know and he’s waving to me. I don’t know who he is.“

She added, “I go ‘why are you sitting in your car in our neighborhood? And he goes ‘I’m resting’ and I’m like you weren’t two blocks back’’.”

As she walked to a neighbor’s house, Phillips followed her.  

“I can’t get away from him! Get away from me!” She yelled over the call.

Phillips said he was going to leave, but decided to stay.

“I thought about it. ‘If I leave, it’s looking like I’m guilty of whatever she’s talking about.”

We spoke with the neighbor whose house the woman went over to. He didn’t want to speak on camera, but said he only called 911 because the woman asked and was screaming for help.

Other neighbors, including Kelly Odom, agreed with Phillips that the woman’s actions were racist.

“We all don’t feel that way,” Odom said referring to white people.
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(07-14-2018, 12:07 AM)Iron Maiden Wrote: Resting before going to your yoga class?  Better think twice, apparently:

https://www.foxla.com/news/local-news/ma...long-beach

Quote:A man told his story about an experience he described as racial profiling in a neighborhood where he was parked in his car.

Ezekiel Phillips said if he weren’t black, a white woman would have never felt threatened by his presence.

“You don’t have to call 911 on me. Talk to me. Ask me my name,” Phillips said.

Phillips had just dropped someone off near 1470 Ramillo Avenue in Long Beach and decided to take a 30-minute break before going to his yoga class, which was around the corner.

He was listening to his bikram yoga CD in when a woman walked up to his car.

“You’re not supposed to be here. This is a good neighborhood. At that moment I’m like, ‘wait hold up’. Have a good day ma’am. Namaste. And I rolled my window up,” he told FOX 11 reporter, Leah Uko.

The verbal exchange escalated from there.

“She took her phone out; started taking pictures, filming doing whatever she was doing. Hey I went to film school. I can take film as well. So I got out the car, I started filming her as soon as I start filming her, ‘what are you doing?’ Leave me alone! I’m feeling threatened. Help! Help!’ It was one of those.”

The woman called for Long Beach police to come to her street.

In the 911 audio obtained by FOX 11, the woman is heard addressing the operator.

“I noticed him two houses up from my parents’ house and I’m like, you know and he’s waving to me. I don’t know who he is.“

She added, “I go ‘why are you sitting in your car in our neighborhood? And he goes ‘I’m resting’ and I’m like you weren’t two blocks back’’.”

As she walked to a neighbor’s house, Phillips followed her.  

“I can’t get away from him! Get away from me!” She yelled over the call.

Phillips said he was going to leave, but decided to stay.

“I thought about it. ‘If I leave, it’s looking like I’m guilty of whatever she’s talking about.”

We spoke with the neighbor whose house the woman went over to. He didn’t want to speak on camera, but said he only called 911 because the woman asked and was screaming for help.

Other neighbors, including Kelly Odom, agreed with Phillips that the woman’s actions were racist.

“We all don’t feel that way,” Odom said referring to white people.

Like seriouisly. Is it that hard to do?  Like, the easiest thing to have done is if she was that uneasy about it, just go up to him and be like "hey, are you doing okay?" Or, and this might be crazy talk--MIND YOUR GODDAMN BUSINESS!!!!
 I think all Marvel films are okay. This is my design.

Except for Thor 2: the literal worst.
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A 72-year-old Nazi in Florida was upset he was about to be evicted, so tried to burn the Jewish people inside:

https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/c...23050.html

Quote:A resident at a Miami Beach condo was angry after learning he was about to be evicted so he planned to burn down the building and had one group, in particular, targeted, police say. 

Along with gasoline and some of the materials he planned to use to fan the flames, detectives found artifacts with swastikas and books of Nazi ideology inside his apartment.

Miami Beach police said their quick action responding to a tip stopped a condo complex on Collins Avenue from going up in flames Thursday afternoon.

“We are confident the work of our detectives prevented an imminent crisis at 5601 Collins Ave.,” police said Friday morning after the arrest of Walter Edward Stolper on a charge of attempted arson in the first degree.

Police say Stolper, 72, was angry over being served eviction papers and had expressed anger and aggression toward other residents at the condominium on several occasions.

On Thursday, police say Stolper told witness Luis Diaz that he was “going to burn down the building with all the f------ Jews,” according to the arrest report. 
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The racism is the chaser - the slew of n-words - but the shot is "I voted for Bernie Sanders":

https://twitter.com/cltuprising/status/1...7353629699
home taping is killing music
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“I built this land...”. Ah the battle cry of mediocre white men glomming on to past glories they weren’t even a part of everywhere.
 I think all Marvel films are okay. This is my design.

Except for Thor 2: the literal worst.
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For my dude commodore - here's your best friend Mark Zuckerberg sticking up for Holocaust deniers as not knowing any better:

https://www.recode.net/2018/7/18/1758448...-news-feed
home taping is killing music
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Antonio Delgado, who used to be a rapper, is running for Congress in the New York 19th - my old district. This, of course, has led people in "liberal communities" up there, like New Paltz, to say shit that is racist af:

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/17/us/po...yrics.html

I'm really glad we get to have the "rap isn't real music" debate. Again.
home taping is killing music
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Roseanne Barr has more to say:

https://twitter.com/CharlesMBlow/status/...6023961601
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Okay. Not dismissing anything she's done or said, but there's something clearly wrong with her.

Also. How hard is it for her to just shut the fuck up? Because she's just proving people's point. Again and again and again.
 I think all Marvel films are okay. This is my design.

Except for Thor 2: the literal worst.
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Rosanne reminds me a lot of Oliver Stone, in that she's both been told for years that she "tells it like it is" and is "uncompromising and honest," but can't see how her own biases have affected her.
home taping is killing music
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Chase Bank wouldn't deposit a $169,876 check from a man wrongfully convicted for murder who spent 23 years in prison:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local...story.html

Quote:An attorney representing a man who spent 23 years locked up for a murder he didn’t commit says her client was turned away twice by Chase Bank when he tried to deposit a check from the state of Illinois to compensate him for his time imprisoned.

Chase Bank, meanwhile, said it made a mistake in turning him away once but denied doing it twice, calling the second incident this week a misunderstanding.

The exoneree, Darryl Fulton, said he was “proven innocent” and expressed frustration with the ordeal.

“I’m just trying to deposit my check,” Fulton said. “I just wanted to be treated like anyone else.”

Kathleen Zellner criticized Chase for not allowing Fulton to deposit a $169,876 check from the state at its bank branch on 79th and Cicero, questioning whether racism played a part. The first time Fulton tried to deposit the money, Zellner said, the bank said she would have to endorse the check because her firm’s name was under his, though Fulton’s name was on the “pay to the order of” line.

Zellner said the law firm’s name was on the check because it was mailed to her office.

The second time, Zellner said, Chase claimed Fulton signed above her name and the check would need to be deposited in her account. Zellner got on the phone with the bank but they wouldn’t deposit it, she said.
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Another in those "Trump voters are good people of faith who barely disguise their racism as faith!" articles features some choice examples:

https://twitter.com/jbouie/status/1021045518863134721
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Yeah...I made the right choice going atheist.


And of course fucking Alabama.
 I think all Marvel films are okay. This is my design.

Except for Thor 2: the literal worst.
Reply
The racism of Milwaukee has certainly been discussed in this thread before, but Brewers player Josh Hader recently returned to the mound after some racist tweets were unearthed and he was given a sustained ovation.  Black players protesting racial injustice?  They don't exactly get the same response, do they?

http://mlb.nbcsports.com/2018/07/22/brew...ve-tweets/

Here are the tweets:

https://mlb.nbcsports.com/2018/07/18/bre...from-2011/

Quote:Someone decided to dig through Hader’s Twitter history this evening and when they did they found some ugly, ugly stuff in there from back in 2011-12.* Hader was found to have used the n-word, liberally. He said “I hate gay people.” He said some super misogynistic stuff about wanting a woman who will cook and clean for him, among other pretty damn vile things. There were multiple references to cocaine. He said “I’ll murder your family” to one person and made some total non-sequitur tweet simply saying “KKK.” You name a social media etiquette line that one can cross and Hader not only crossed it, but he totally and gleefully trampled over. If you want to see that vile stuff you can see it over at The Big Lead, which screen-capped it. I presume Hader has deleted them by now.

The news of Hader’s old, unearthed tweets bubbled out as the All-Star Game was going on, and reporters met Hader in the locker room right afterward for comment. Hader owned up to them — there was no “I was hacked” excuses offered here — saying that the tweets were a sign of immaturity when he was 17 years-old. He said he plans to apologize to his teammates, saying they don’t reflect on him as a person now. His quote: “No excuses. I was dumb and stupid.” Which, well, yes, obviously.

I know I don't post much about what minors are/were doing, but this post has just as much to do with Milwaukee's response that it does Hader's vileness.
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Conservative comic artist/asshole Ben Garrison's latest comic about Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez is... something.

https://twitter.com/wheelswordsmith/stat...5692431362
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Wasn't sure where to post this, but I guess we'll go with here, mostly because the Josh Hader bit up there is mildly illustrative of my point.

I know we've got some real "Zero Tolerance/One Strike and You're Out/No Second Chances" folks here (or at least it certainly seems like it), but seriously...what's the statute of limitations on a statement made in the past, and at what point do we start giving the benefit of the doubt that someone may actually have become a better person despite never having their career ruined/been publicly shamed over it?

Is James Gunn now required to be in Director Jail for the rest of his career for horrible jokes he made years before he worked for the company that just fired him?

Is Josh Hader forever "vile" because he tweeted some vile stuff when he was a teenager?

What's the in even trying to become a better person if you're forever damned because say, you were a teenage "edgelord" in your youth (as an example)? If the "enlightened" will never accept you because clearly you're an evil hateful person because of these things you tweeted years ago, why WOULDN'T you retreat to the refuge of the vile? What can you do to earn your way back into society's good graces when tweets are involved? What's the "necessary penance" for stuff you did as a teenager that wasn't illegal but possibly hurtful or offensive?

Set aside the political double-standards, and yes, common sense still applies in that SOME actions certainly should not have much, if any statute of limitations and SHOULD always be cause for shaming at least and legal action where warranted. But we're talking about tweets here. Where is the line drawn?
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(07-24-2018, 06:18 AM)jmacq1 Wrote: Is James Gunn now required to be in Director Jail for the rest of his career for horrible jokes he made years before he worked for the company that just fired him?

Not if Roman Polanski can win a goddamn Oscar.
My karmic debt must be huge.

----------

My blog: An Embarrassment of Rich's
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At least several of Gunn's most egregious Tweets came while he was employed by Disney. I mostly agree with jmaq, but if we're going to argue about this in every single thread, Big Grin, let's get the facts right.

Also, Polanski winning an Oscar was FIFTEEN YEARS AGO. He hasn't worked with a major star in almost a decade - since Carnage, in 2011. I think the time for pointing him to as indicative of Hollywood's double standard has long passed.
home taping is killing music
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(07-24-2018, 06:18 AM)jmacq1 Wrote: I know we've got some real "Zero Tolerance/One Strike and You're Out/No Second Chances" folks here (or at least it certainly seems like it), but seriously...what's the statute of limitations on a statement made in the past, and at what point do we start giving the benefit of the doubt that someone may actually have become a better person despite never having their career ruined/been publicly shamed over it?

Hell, I'm not even one of those people... a bulk of my problem and argumentative reasoning against this stuff is "everything offends *someone* so who gives a shit if you're offended, what makes you so fucking special?"

But the answer is NEVER.

Okay, let's make it simple. Someone as a teen tweets/facebooks a racist joke. Something they find funny, on the sophisitication and level of Roseannes tweet. That's fine. Literally nothing else, no other Nazi behaviour or membership of dubious groups. Just a stupid joke meant to impress their dumbass eight followers at the time.

They go about their lives, end up in the movie business. End up casted for/working on a Black Panther sequel. It's announced at SDCC.

So, now the following things have to happen:

1) No-one out of the millions of people out there goes obsessively looking for the tweet, in order to score likes and reputation.
2) A huge chunk of the followers of person (1) to not retweet or bring it up, or offer a cheap opinion in response. If even 5 percent of the followers of (1) go for it, it'll launch into a tweetstorm.
3) A mainstream media to ignore the online kerfuffle because it is an easy article to write.
4) Every executive in a Disney boardroom (say twelve people?) all agreeing that they're happy that they can ride this out and it won't affect the bottom line at all.

How many years/decades before all of that is ever true?

I think the reason he survived in 2012 is step three didn't really happen. There was a bit of an online set-to amongst progressive nerds, but it never really got out beyond that in a huge way. The complaint was about the graphic sexual descriptions and homophobic mocking nature of a blog post about superheroes he wrote. Honestly, there was an element of pearl clutching, moral crusader stuff about that. Kids are a whole different ballpark.

There is a narrative amongst the right-on types that they forgave him at the time, but who knows if that's true and it wasn't instead that people were distracted? I suspect a significant amount of people were trying to learn Gangnam Style than being interested in a tweet mob. We could just as easily thank Psy for saving him the first time.
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The narrative is that Gunn apologized for the tweets in 2012. This is also factually incorrect. He apologized for an article about what he wrote in a blog about superheroes he wanted to have sex with. The tweets, as far as I know, did not come up then:

https://www.glaad.org/blog/director-jame...-blog-post

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/g...unn-395796

""A couple of years ago I wrote a blog that was meant to be satirical and funny. In rereading it over the past day I don't think it's funny. The attempted humor in the blog does not represent my actual feelings. However, I can see where statements were poorly worded and offensive to many. I'm sorry and regret making them at all," Gunn writes.

"People who are familiar with me as evidenced by my Facebook page and other mediums know that I'm an outspoken proponent for the rights of the gay and lesbian community, women and anyone who feels disenfranchised, and it kills me that some other outsider like myself, despite his or her gender or sexuality, might feel hurt or attacked by something I said," he continues. "We're all in the same camp, and I want to do my best to make this world a better place for all of us. I'm learning all the time. I promise to be more careful with my words in the future. And I will do my best to be funnier as well. Much love to all. -- James Gunn."

So no, he didn't ever actually apologize for the Tweets.
home taping is killing music
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That's what I SAID! Smile
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If only he'd promised to also be more careful with his words in the past.
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But yes, Disney were also hiring a edgy director for their big budget movie, in the time honored strategy that hired Peter Jackson and Sam Raimi. None of the stuff in that blog post really seemed major enough to start a pitchfork mob. It was offensive, but surivivable and probably went in with the narrative that this guy was wild and out there and not a corporate hire.
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(07-24-2018, 06:54 AM)boone daniels Wrote: Also, Polanski winning an Oscar was FIFTEEN YEARS AGO. He hasn't worked with a major star in almost a decade - since Carnage, in 2011. I think the time for pointing him to as indicative of Hollywood's double standard has long passed.

He still got a pass for THIRTY-FOUR YEARS.  Gunn doesn't deserve one second in director jail compared to that.
My karmic debt must be huge.

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My blog: An Embarrassment of Rich's
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I was busy looking for the movie 'Thirty-Four Years', until I re-read that.

Yeah, Polanski is a weird case. I think it says how much the elite can protect a guy like that though. But that's done. He's not getting any more time in the spotlight now #metoo is here, no chance.
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