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The Cabin in the Woods - Post Release
#36

I'll hopefully be seeing this again on Monday at another screening.  I'm hoping for a kick-ass crowd.

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#37

Just saw it... SWEET MOTHER OF GOD I LOVE THIS MOVIE!!! SO.....FUCKING...GOOD!!

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#38

This film is an UTTER DELIGHT!

AGAIN!

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#39

Whenever I want to feel good about movies, I come to this thread. Smile

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#40
AI HAVEN'T SEEN IT A SECOND TIME YET BUT YYYYEEEESSSS!!!!!!
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#41
AI'm itching for this thread to take off...
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#42

I was ready for the film to start again right as the credits rolled. You know how people say, "Don't expect the movie to give you a blow job or anything." Well, if you are a horror geek, you can basically expect this to give you a blow job in the last act.

My personal favorite part:

The trio of goddamn scarecrows that burst in and rip that one dude apart, followed by the Merman and the blood spout.

But yeah, maybe I can see someone not totally loving this if they aren't a horror geek.

Fuck that, this movie's great. Something for everyone.

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#43

It's great.

The puppeteers playing "dial-a-trope" in service to the Old Ones feel like a hilarious commentary on frustrated horror filmmakers - they're forced to do the same old redneck zombies and J-horror ghost girl shit, and poor Bradley Whitford just wants to make his goddamn Merman movie.

As such, I want to hear what pigeonholed guys like Romero and Carpenter have to say about this movie even more than, say, Sam Raimi.

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#44


Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebastian OB View Post

I was ready for the film to start again right as the credits rolled. You know how people say, "Don't expect the movie to give you a blow job or anything." Well, if you are a horror geek, you can basically expect this to give you a blow job in the last act.

My personal favorite part:

The trio of goddamn scarecrows that burst in and rip that one dude apart, followed by the Merman and the blood spout.

But yeah, maybe I can see someone not totally loving this if they aren't a horror geek.

Fuck that, this movie's great. Something for everyone.

I loved

Whitford's reaction to the Merman. Priceless. And the scarecrows are great, too, but what I love most is the big reveal that Marty and Dana are surrounded by cages upon cages of monsters, demons, spirits, enormous animals and insects, zombies, and more. It reminded me a bit of watching the Cantina scene in Star Wars the first time; my eyes were going berserk just trying to soak in the different creatures and killers.



Even for people who aren't huge horror buffs, this is definitely a treat. Only those with the strongest of aversions to horror should stay away; if you occasionally stay up late to giggle and titter at random horror films (so as to hide how freaked out you are), you'll like this. That's basically what I've been telling people.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil View Post

It's great.

The puppeteers playing "dial-a-trope" in service to the Old Ones feel like a hilarious commentary on frustrated horror filmmakers - they're forced to do the same old redneck zombies and J-horror ghost girl shit, and poor Bradley Whitford just wants to make his goddamn Merman movie.

As such, I want to hear what pigeonholed guys like Romero and Carpenter have to say about this movie even more than, say, Sam Raimi.


Well, that black box is so nice, I'm going to post it twice.

I think my favorite beat in the whole movie is Jenkins consoling Whitford over the conch. Sitterson just wants to see a Merman! Is that so much to ask? The real magic to that whole thing though is that I immediately wanted to see an alternate version of Cabin where Hemsworth does blow the conch, or finish the puzzle, or where the little ballerina figure does whatever it needs to in order to summon the sugar plum fairy. I'm dying to know what those movies look like, and I know I'll never see 'em-- so I've just got to put my imagination to work.

Easily a best of the year for me. I have plans to see it this weekend and next Thursday, already.

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#45

People!  Go see this with a crowd!  As much as you can!

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#46

The crowd I saw it was with great, but I'm in LA and the crowds here are better than average I think. Movies are a big deal here and people take them seriously. However, there was a woman next to me who was literally on the edge of her seat -- leaning forward -- and everytime there was a scare she would practically fall off of it and then she would look back at the audience self-conciously. It was weird and a little distracting. I thought she was going to grab my arm at one point. Thankfully she didn't. By the last act I was so giddy with glee there could have been rabid grizzly sitting next to me and I wouldn't have noticed.

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#47

"We've replaced the person sitting in the seat next to Sebastian with Brody the Bear. Let's see if he notices."

...

My own screening was...well, it was kind of low key. Boston's crowds are fairly hit or miss from my own experience, and while people really got into the movie before the last thirty minutes roll around-- they were lively during the comedic moments for sure-- they all seemed subdued once Cabin started hurtling toward its end. Don't know if it was good subdued or bad subdued; they were just quiet.

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#48

Oh man, I grew up in Boston and was there all through my 20s. Tough crowd all around.

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#49

No joke, either. I think the only movie I've seen in theaters this year that got a consistently positive response from the crowd was Jump Street. They laughed at Silent House, booed The Grey, and talked through John Carter. The people I saw Cabin with at least seemed to like the movie even if the ending sobered them up, but man. Boston theater audiences can be brutal.

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#50

I'm seeing this Friday and Saturday night with the biggest, most perfect crowds I can possibly find.

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#51

I am so not a horror fan.  The genre pumps out more schlock than anything this side of porn (not coincidentally I think), and I pretty much gave up on it as a kid.  But every now and then a horror flick will charm me, and this one was pretty great.  I don't know that I am prepared to call it an instant classic, but it is a really fun, funny, smart movie.

Was it just me or was the opening title a nod to Funny Games?

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#52


Quote:
Originally Posted by JuddL View Post

Was it just me or was the opening title a nod to Funny Games?


Not just you!

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#53

I immediately thought of Funny Games when the title came up, too.

Absolute perfection.  It might not be for everybody, but I can't think of anything the film does wrong.  It accomplishes every goal it sets out to achieve, and this is not an unambitious film.

Something makes me think that in a few years we'll be quoting this as much as Anchorman.  I think my favorite 'line' was...

Jenkins' "Fuck you!  Fuck you!  Fuck you!  Fuck you!" to the Japanese school girls who defeated the long-haired ghost.

Horror's my favorite genre and this thing was just so tuned in to what I like.  I smiled when Hemsworth played with the obvious Hellraiser-inspired puzzle, but when the

Pinhead clone

showed up in act three, I completely lost it laughing.

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#54


Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dark Shape View Post
 I think my favorite 'line' was...

Jenkins' "Fuck you!  Fuck you!  Fuck you!  Fuck you!" to the Japanese school girls who defeated the long-haired ghost.


So good.  And it's so applicable for our everyday lives!

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#55

Sebastian OB and agracru: Glad to see two more Bostoners chiming in.  Just got back from the midnight AMC Fenway screening and, yes, loved CABIN IN THE WOODS.  Terrific stuff!

I haven't had that much fun in a theater since I convinced a couple of 16 year olds that THE HUNGER GAMES was a remake of SOLARBABIES.

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#56

Jesus fucking Christ, this was amazing. Saw it with a packed crowd last night, and it just ... KEPT ... GETTING ... BETTER.

Its landing nice and solidly as my favorite flick of the year thus far, and you know what? This is in my top-10 favorite movies of all-time. This is a goddamned love-letter to horror fans and fans of movies in general, and I'm really glad that something so perfect actually got made and (eventually) released.

I'm in the middle of making a short film with a fuckton of monsters in it, and this fucking movie just inspired the shit out of me.

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#57

The "fuck you" line got a huge laugh from the audience I saw this with last week, too. I imagine it'll get the same when I see it again this weekend and next Thursday.

My brother's a huge Hellraiser fan so the very clear reference to the series as Hemsworth plays with the little puzzle ball got him pretty giddy. But that's nothing compared to

how he reacted to the payoff of that particular bit of set-up. During the elevator scene when Dana and Marty stop in between the sugarplum fairy and Fornicus, Lord of Bondage and Pain, you'd have thought he'd won the fucking lottery or something.

But I think that's exactly what makes Cabin such a great movie for horror fans. No matter what you like, it's going to give you exactly what you like.

And yes, the more Bostonians on CHUD the better!

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#58

Something I'll bring in for the sake of discussion because I thought it was worth noting -- one of the less retarded guys over at AICN wrote a decent review, but in it he expresses concerns that this movie creates a "now we've seen it all" effect in horror where we now have nowhere to go. It's like he felt like CABIN IN THE WOODS pulled the curtain back too far and too cleverly, the way SCREAM did in the 90's but even moreso. The weird thing is that I had the opposite feeling, like the movie was just the sort of shot in the arm the genre needed. IMO mainstream horror has sort of devolved into this purely base entertainment; I mean the PARANORMAL ACTIVITY movies are literally nothing but scares. I barely qualify them as movies. CABIN IN THE WOODS is a smart horror film that almost puts the genre in the same playing field as an INCEPTION or something. It raises the bar. If there were more horror movies like this, the genre wouldn't be so ghettoized.

Anyway, intersting topic I felt was worthy of discussion. What do you guys think?

Can't wait to see it again, going Sunday.

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#59

I agree. The movie suggests that the genre's possibilities are endless, really. That a razor-witted horror film with twists that are earned and laughs that aren't cheap is a more satisfying experience than just another by-the-numbers dead teenager movie.

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#60

Great movie.

SPOILERS

SPOILERS

I wonder how the logistics of the Japan scenario work out, given how Weaver explained everything.  But then I guess it's different for every culture.  Jenkins' "Fuck you!" to all the girls got the biggest laugh at my showing this morning.

I also howled like crazy when Thor's motorbike ate it.

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#61

I've also reading some reviews claiming that Whedon and Goddard's intent here is to "nuke the genre". I just find that a baffling read on the film. It's a goddamn love letter. It's telling you why we NEED the genre. I feel like that's the whole meta-textual point --  we need horror films to 'appease' our need for blood, but man, isn't it fun doing it?

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#62


Quote:
Originally Posted by Rando View Post

Great movie.

SPOILERS

SPOILERS

I wonder how the logistics of the Japan scenario work out, given how Weaver explained everything.  But then I guess it's different for every culture.  Jenkins' "Fuck you!" to all the girls got the biggest laugh at my showing this morning.

I also howled like crazy when Thor's motorbike ate it.


I was laughing during the whole buildup to that jump, because it was obvious what was going to happen.  Knowing about the force field really heightened the cheese of his ostensibly heroic machismo in that moment.

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#63

What's funny about that macheesemo scene is that for a moment, I actually forgot about the field because the movie allowed it to build up so earnestly.  That made it even funnier as a punchline.

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#64


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike's Pants View Post

Genuine apologies if I've missed a pre existing thread. I just really need to talk to someone about this.

See it immediately and come back here. It's just phenomenal and I know there are some folk here (Spoiler: *****edited out ) who will lose their collective shit.

Scary, clever, very funny, uncompromising and brave.

I just can't say another fucking word and it's killing me.

2012 is shaping up nicely.



Spoiler question about the spoiler in this.

 Not a fan of Supernatural.  What was the tie in?

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#65


Quote:
Originally Posted by Anyawatchin Angel View Post



Spoiler question about the spoiler in this.

 Not a fan of Supernatural.  What was the tie in?

Was it the murderous Unicorn?


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#66


Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebastian OB View Post

I've also reading some reviews claiming that Whedon and Goddard's intent here is to "nuke the genre". I just find that a baffling read on the film. It's a goddamn love letter. It's telling you why we NEED the genre. I feel like that's the whole meta-textual point --  we need horror films to 'appease' our need for blood, but man, isn't it fun doing it?


At the same time, though, it's also all about the stagnant state of the genre. Phil's comment on page one rings incredibly true for me;

here we're presented with myriad possibilities of what the threat at the cabin could be, and yet Sitterson and Hadley are stuck making yet another fucking redneck zombie flick while their Japanese counterparts are churning out another spooky ghost girl yarn.

I'm pretty sure I've used the phrase "nuke horror from orbit" in some of my own Facebook/comment thread/Twitter discussions of Cabin-- I won't have a full review until Monday-- but speaking for myself, I don't mean to say that Cabin's on a seek-and-destroy mission here. Like Joseph Kahn does with the innumerable tropes and ideas delved into with Detention, Cabin's intent is to take the mores of horror and break them down to their most basic strands of DNA for two purposes: one, to show just how arid and stale horror has grown of late as an entire category of cinema. Two, to remind us of the things about horror that we love as fans, and to issue a challenge to horror filmmakers to do better.

I don't think anyone here will deny just how much of contemporary horror fare is ultimately just disposable, cheap, and plain old rotten. Cabin very slyly displays that to us in a way that's smart, scary, witty, and entertaining. And at the same time, it's very clearly a movie made by people who absolutely love horror films. It's a movie that could only have been crafted by a couple of guys who dig on watching teens and adults get dismembered, melted, eaten, slashed, stabbed, immolated, crushed, liquified, broken, and otherwise lethally manhandled by a designated supernatural antagonist. It's a movie that's pointing out what's stymying the genre today and also what draws us to it in the first place.

I think anyone just citing Cabin as a criticism of horror without acknowledging that it's also a clear love letter is somewhat missing the point. It's both of those things.

EDIT: it just occurred to me but would you be referring to a comment by Film Crit Hulk?

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#67


Quote:
Originally Posted by agracru View Post


At the same time, though, it's also all about the stagnant state of the genre. Phil's comment on page one rings incredibly true for me;

here we're presented with myriad possibilities of what the threat at the cabin could be, and yet Sitterson and Hadley are stuck making yet another fucking redneck zombie flick while their Japanese counterparts are churning out another spooky ghost girl yarn.

I'm pretty sure I've used the phrase "nuke horror from orbit" in some of my own Facebook/comment thread/Twitter discussions of Cabin-- I won't have a full review until Monday-- but speaking for myself, I don't mean to say that Cabin's on a seek-and-destroy mission here. Like Joseph Kahn does with the innumerable tropes and ideas delved into with Detention, Cabin's intent is to take the mores of horror and break them down to their most basic strands of DNA for two purposes: one, to show just how arid and stale horror has grown of late as an entire category of cinema. Two, to remind us of the things about horror that we love as fans, and to issue a challenge to horror filmmakers to do better.

I understand reading the film that way, but I think your misinterpreting Phil's point (though he may chime in to disagree). Stitterson and Hadley can be seen as "directors" and their frustrations could be seen as commercial limitations of the genre, but I don't think the film has an agenda to challenge filmmakers to make better horror films, aside from just being a better horror film itself. I think it is challenging you to think about WHY these tropes exist, WHY they work, WHY we love them. I feel like the character of Truman is there to literally ask, "Why are we doing this?" and "Why are we enjoying this?" And in the end, there turns out to be a real fucking reason. That's what I feel the real message and intent of the film, not to "skewer" or "nuke" the genre, but to revel in it and take a few well aimed but loving pokes at it. And in doing so, it elevates it.

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#68

I don't think my analogy is necessarily a summation of the film's themes as a whole; I just think the poor guy stuck doing hackwork, who yearns to make his merman opus, is a great little bit of commentary served up along with everything else going on in the film and its subtext.

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#69

Going to see this later tonight.  I hope to God I have a decent audience, and not the kind of people who will make "SAW was better" remarks at the end.

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#70

Can we ditch spoiler tags given that the movie is now out? It's impossible to discuss ANYTHING in this movie without spoiling it.

Anyway, just got back. I had a great, great time, but I feel like most of that comes from the surprise and unpredictability of the film. I can't imagine I'll enjoy a rewatch all that much - the whole thing is one big wink, and I can't imagine being all that thrilled to spend more time with these characters and their world(s).

What I had issue with is the stridently academic viewpoint of the horror genre as OPPOSED to the idea of what's scary. Obviously you can view the agency that Whitford and Jenkins work for as filmmakers whose job it is to keep producing scares and deaths to appease the Ancient Ones. But you have that one shot (which leads into the free-for-all at the end) where you've got rotating blocks, each featuring a monster and/or boogeyman - clever, because it looks like one big candy machine, pop in a dollar and order a monster.

But then Amy Acker's character corrects Brian White when he says, "It's like something out of a nightmare," and she says they are what CAUSES nightmares. Essentially, each year these guys pick innocents to face the wrath of whatever boogeyman, because it stokes fear much like how screams/laughs power the generators in Monsters Inc.

Except that we're not all scared of boogeymen or monsters. We are scared of death, and of reminders of our own morality. But what of non-horror-movie scares? I can only speak for myself, but monsters and killers have only factored in maybe 20% of my all-time nightmares. Sometimes people get scared of mundane things. Losing a child. War. Not being prepared for their final test. Look at the lists of all-time scariest movies - stuff like "Come And See" and "Requiem For A Dream" often rank with boogeymen-fueled films like "Hellraiser" or something.

Of course, I know "Hellraiser" isn't necessarily a boogeyman-fueled film, and a good example of what I'm talking about. But the public's perception of that film stems from their recognition of Pinhead. And so the film uses a Pinhead-alike as the popular avatar of this specific horror, when anyone who has actually seen "Hellraiser" would find Pinhead one of the least-scary aspects of the film. But I would imagine more people have been terrified, or have ended their lives, from the thought or reality of, say, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome than a ballerina with a face full of teeth.

This bummed me out a bit, because the film seemed like it was confusing "what's scary" to "what's accepted as scary to people who watch a lot of movies." In other words, they're just exploring the horror genre, but they're not exploring why people respond to it, or why people get scared for these films. Is Freddy Krueger scary on his own? Obviously not, given the diminishing returns of the sequels. But in the right context, Freddy is scary as fuck. This movie doesn't really care about said context. It just pops out one monster at a time. Particularly surprised they went with redneck zombies, as zombies are the most played-out boogeyman of the last decade. I suppose that's part of the joke. The joke goes on for like half the movie, though.

On that level, "Cabin In The Woods" is fun as far as being a movie-about-movies, even to the point where we see the same shortcut used two years in a row - Sigourney Weaver geek-cameoing as a big-bad exposition machine ("Paul"). And I had a great time with it, especially near the end during that big monster-mash. Good casting, some funny gags, Jenkins and Whitford are a hoot, and my Times Square audience seemed into it. Just thought it was a little undercooked.

"Detention" is the better, and crazier balls-out ridiculous movie this weekend, but this was okay.

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