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SpaceX and NASA send first private craft into space
#36

 Also the Moon is really a giant Egg as detailed in a recent "Dr. Who" documentary.

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#37
AWell, considering I went to school with a guy in space right now (Kjell) and talked to him yesterday, I guess I'm part of the conspiracy. Cool! Always wanted to be one of "Them."
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#38
A[quote name="Analog Olmos" url="/community/t/143621/spacex-and-nasa-send-first-private-craft-into-space#post_3935179"]I went to school with a guy in space[/quote]
Must've been a long bus ride.
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#39
Quote:

Originally Posted by commodorejohn View Post


Must've been a long bus ride.


Ha, no kidding.



Should have said residency, but NASA conspiracy folks drive me bonkers and I just dashed it off quick.  NASA has to be the least secretive and most transparent place I've ever worked - you can literally just walk 2 buildings over and knock on the door of the folks working on Orion, we just had a meeting TODAY with the guys from SpaceX who keep giving us pushback on our medical requirements, and every week the crew surgeons have a private conference with the on-orbit crew.  Not only do we not have the money to do ANYTHING other than what we're (very publicly) funded to be working on, but we couldn't hide anything if our lives depended on it.  Why?  Because NASA is basically made up of folks like me.  I get that from the outside NASA could seem like this spooky organization, but I wish folks would realize that in reality it's the last example of what government SHOULD be:  the pooling of resources to accomplish things beyond what any individual could accomplish on their own.  SpaceX and Boeing should be commended for what they're trying to accomplish, but let's also remember that the only way the commercial crew initiative is possible is because NASA is funding them to the tune of $6 Billion over the next 5 years.



Anyway, conspiracy dude you can ask me anything if you want, promise I'll tell you the truth.  If you don't want to believe it that's on you.

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#40

Yeah, all that and stuff, but NASA does nothing in space!

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#41
ADespite myself, now I want to hear what this person thinks NASA is really up to.
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#42
Quote:

Originally Posted by Reasor View Post

Despite myself, now I want to hear what this person thinks NASA is really up to.

One thing's for sure:  It's definitely nothing in space.

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#43
Quote:

Originally Posted by Analog Olmos View Post
 


Ha, no kidding.



Should have said residency, but NASA conspiracy folks drive me bonkers and I just dashed it off quick.  NASA has to be the least secretive and most transparent place I've ever worked - you can literally just walk 2 buildings over and knock on the door of the folks working on Orion, we just had a meeting TODAY with the guys from SpaceX who keep giving us pushback on our medical requirements, and every week the crew surgeons have a private conference with the on-orbit crew.  Not only do we not have the money to do ANYTHING other than what we're (very publicly) funded to be working on, but we couldn't hide anything if our lives depended on it.  Why?  Because NASA is basically made up of folks like me.  I get that from the outside NASA could seem like this spooky organization, but I wish folks would realize that in reality it's the last example of what government SHOULD be:  the pooling of resources to accomplish things beyond what any individual could accomplish on their own.  SpaceX and Boeing should be commended for what they're trying to accomplish, but let's also remember that the only way the commercial crew initiative is possible is because NASA is funding them to the tune of $6 Billion over the next 5 years.



Anyway, conspiracy dude you can ask me anything if you want, promise I'll tell you the truth.  If you don't want to believe it that's on you.



Sure, you'd say that.

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#44

The only thing NASA should be doing right now is building a space elevator.  Once we can get to orbit everything else is easier.

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#45
AYeah, definitely put all other research on hold until we do the space elevator. I'm sure the problems of engineering a stable structure that needs to be literally miles high, subject to mind-boggling forces as its top moves at least a dozen times faster than its bottom, and made out of materials we don't even have yet are mere trivialities. Surely we can spare a few indeterminately long periods of waiting for things that may not actually turn out to be possible while we hold off on actually doing stuff we have the capability to do that's interesting and useful!
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#46
AHere's a serious question, Analog Olmos: Why don't we return to the Moon before going to Mars? The Austronauts will be there for a while. Surely they need to practice living in a similar environment before heading off on a 9 month journey. It's a laudable goal but not realistic.

Chris Hadfield has implied the same in many interviews. He said "We are learning to run before we can walk".
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#47
A[quote name="Bluelouboyle" url="/community/t/143621/spacex-and-nasa-send-first-private-craft-into-space/30#post_3935342"]Here's a serious question, Analog Olmos: Why don't we return to the Moon before going to Mars? The Austronauts will be there for a while. Surely they need to practice living in a similar environment before heading off on a 9 month journey. It's a laudable goal but not realistic.

Chris Hadfield has implied the same in many interviews. He said "We are learning to run before we can walk".[/quote]I seem to recall at some point that it was indeed the plan to go back to the Moon (and establish a permanent presence there?) before going on to Mars.
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#48
AWe established pretty quickly that the Moon had no oil and our hearts moved on.
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