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The Chewer Work Thread
Interviews are absolutely two way streets.  I need to convince you that I'm the right person for the job, and you need to convince me that I would want to work here.  I've had job offers from places where the interview went fine but the vibe was all wrong, and I ended up passing on the offers.

Good on you, Brad.  I've had bad interviews before too but I never had the gumption to just end them.  I suspect that having two job offers in your back pocket helped with the 'don't-give-a-fuckitude'.
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I accepted one of the offers this afternoon, so I technically have a job again.

Whew, the nightmare is over. Or it's just beginning.
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Congratulations!
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Judas, any developments?
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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Everything worked out fine.
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This week I learned:

A) Don't check your work email while on vacation.

B) If you ignore 'A' then don't answer any questions, no matter how well intended they are...because...

C) Your less than perceptive co-worker might start sending you files to 'look at', despite myself not having any  computer outside of my phone.
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Having a weird experience at work this week.  About a year ago I moved from administration to accounting.  On Monday my admin replacement was sick and I was asked to do her work, a full on paperwork emergency that took almost all day to finish.  I did not say no, but in my head I was wondering how long I am going to be on the hook for my old job duties.

Requesting clarification of the boundaries of my job accomplished nothing.  I learned that from management perspective anything they ask me to do, whether its 'my job' or not is fair game.  Especially when I am not busy.  For the time being I will abide but this bodes ill for my longer term future with the company.  Apparently everything is supposed to be peachy because I just got a paltry 3% raise.

Why do managers think its okay to treat people this way?
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(03-20-2019, 09:45 PM)Rylander Wrote: Having a weird experience at work this week.  About a year ago I moved from administration to accounting.  On Monday my admin replacement was sick and I was asked to do her work, a full on paperwork emergency that took almost all day to finish.  I did not say no, but in my head I was wondering how long I am going to be on the hook for my old job duties.

Requesting clarification of the boundaries of my job accomplished nothing.  I learned that from management perspective anything they ask me to do, whether its 'my job' or not is fair game.  Especially when I am not busy.  For the time being I will abide but this bodes ill for my longer term future with the company.  Apparently everything is supposed to be peachy because I just got a paltry 3% raise.

Why do managers think its okay to treat people this way?

Someone got sick and you helped out cause you knew what you to do.

Unless this happens all the time, just chalk it up to taking one for the team.
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(03-20-2019, 09:45 PM)Rylander Wrote: Why do managers think its okay to treat people this way?

Short answer: because most of them are getting treated the same way by their managers.

Ancillary short answer: American business culture is toxic and happily grinds souls for profit.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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I oddly agree with both Overlord and MM.
If you're happy, you're not paying attention.

Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny: 
Glad that you guys worked that out amongst yourselves.

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It's already happened twice in the last 6 months.  I was hoping for closer to 1-2 times a year.

Anyway, I have chosen to stand on the principle and see what happens.  I didn't do anything wrong, I did what they needed and just asked for boundaries afterward.  If they can't handle that, then fuck them.  Still waiting to hear the result of my actual supervisor going to bat for me.
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Need some of that greasy union protection. A lady in the office was sick, so the managers asked someone to come in early and hand out keys to some inspectors. The keys technically could only be handled by the peeps in the office worker's union, we are in the electrical union. Someone bitched and there was a shit storm rained down upon the managers. If someone asked someone else to cover for A WHOLE DAY someone would probably be fired.
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Update:
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It took three agonizing weeks but I have a feeling that tomorrow will be my last day employed there.  Don't want to say any more until tomorrow.  But I am certain they checked my browsing history or in and out times from my parking card, and found whatever they needed to have cause to terminate me.
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And nothing happened today, so glad to have been wrong
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I had been searching for another job, had a few interviews, but nothing clicked. This project we are on is into month 14 and we still have 4 more months to go, and it's been a grind and a half, especially with the other 3-4 additional projects they've stuck in along the way. I just went on vacation for a week, and then came back to getting a retention bonus. So I guess I'm here until this time next year. Lol.
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Update--this past week I was shown the new org chart for our company when we split later this year. I have been a manager since I came to the company 4 years ago (which is why I came to the company in the first place). We had a team meeting with who will be my new boss, and in the meeting...I found out that it looks like I will no longer be a manager. I have a one-on-one with my new boss tomorrow to discuss my role, and then with the CIO in the afternoon. As long as my pay structure isn't changing, I think I'm ready to do less and get paid the same, buff up my skills, then quit the day after I get my bonus next year.
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So I've been a working adult for many years now, and I don't think I've ever really had a bad experience with a co-worker before. Some people I didn't really take to, some people were useless but mostly stayed out of my way or were dealt with by management, but really the most difficulty I've ever had was one guy with just no grasp of office etiquette at all, and even he was actually a pretty stand-up guy in terms of buckling down and getting shit done, he just had zero self-awareness and was prone to quasi-Tourette's outbursts. Even my issues with management have been overall pretty minor in the grand scheme of things (minus that first minimum-wage job back when where my boss would rather I blow out my knees because he thought that sitting comfortably to put things on shelves at floor-level made me too slow.) Unfortunately, it seems I've finally found myself in a genuinely dysfunctional workplace. Which is a bummer, because the work's not bad, the job pays decently, and the training opportunities are good. But all it really takes sometimes is one guy. Specifically, one guy who combines a few problematic traits into a nice little cocktail of toxicity and drags the whole workplace down with him.

See, the big thing with this guy is that he's obviously in tech support because he craves validation and likes to look like a hero - or rather, he thinks he looks like a hero, as you can tell from his emails to clients in which he explains at length everything that he's doing for them, then finishes up with an entire paragraph of fawning best-regards. In reality, however, he's a lazy ass who fills most of his day picking up trivial shit that any of the rest of us could knock out in ninety seconds and spending fifteen goddamn minutes on it, or making extended phone calls to other companies' support lines trying to pass the buck, while being perfectly content to leave genuinely important stuff hanging for days or weeks at a time without so much as updating the client.

Additionally, he never, ever makes any meaningful notes for the rest of us, or reads the notes that we leave on our work. I've been working at this place for over three months now, and in that time we've had multiple fairly substantial client-facing fuck-ups that can be traced directly to the fact that he either said he was going to do something and then didn't, or did something and then didn't tell anyone. There've also been multiple instances where I or one of my other co-workers will pick up a case he was stringing the client along on for days on end and end up resolving it in an hour or two, because on top of everything else he's not nearly as good at his job as he thinks he is; he's strictly a checklist troubleshooter, and probably the most singularly incurious person I've ever seen in a field that revolves around problem-solving and analysis. Present him with an issue he doesn't already know how to fix, and it's only a matter of time before he falls back to suggesting bringing the client's computer in so he can wipe and reinstall it.

All of which would just be an amusing little sideshow, except for the part where the balls he keeps dropping inevitably end up dropped in the laps of the rest of us - usually just because we have something vaguely resembling a work ethic and a professional conscience and end up taking his cases on ourselves in an attempt to mitigate the hassle that our clients have to suffer (which, of course, he gets all territorial and pissy about,) but sometimes we get handed things by the boss, who on some level realizes that things that actually really need to get resolved promptly have to be handled by anyone else. In effect, all of his workload that isn't trivial shit winds up involving one or more of the rest of us at some point, and now that we're getting out of the slow period between New Year's and the end of tax season, it's starting to really affect our ability to keep up on our own work.

Which is a problem for us, because it means we look like a problem to the boss, because as much as he clearly does have some awareness of this guy's issues, it's an elephant that he really, really does not want to acknowledge is in the room. Because, of course, with Problem Guy's tendency to fawn over people whose approval he craves and the boss's own ego issues, they have a sort of sycophantic quasi-friendship going, presumably bonding over their mutual love of bloviating at length on subjects they could cover in a fifth of the time. Which means that the boss is highly receptive to the persecution complex Problem Guy has developed over the difficulties his own inadequacies cause for the rest of us. Boss already thinks that my one co-worker who butts heads with Problem Guy the most straight-up has it in for him, and any time any of the rest of us hint at the issue, he demands that we back up our claims. Even in the morning meetings, when it becomes apparent that Problem Guy fucked up yet again, and even he's on the verge of admitting to it, the boss will jump in and offer him some excuse to latch onto. If the simpler answer of their mutual ego-tripping didn't present itself so obviously, I'd honestly think that Problem Guy had kompromat on him or something.

It sucks, because the rest of my co-workers are all pretty solid, professional dudes with a broad collective skillset, and the overall work environment is pretty good. With one more decent tech on the team in place of the dead weight we currently have, we'd probably be in a pretty good place. I'd been hoping to get a few years out of this job and take advantage of the training/certification opportunities before moving on. But it's super, super obvious by now that this is only going to get worse from here, and it's only a matter of time before this blows up and one of us ends up quitting in disgust - and when that happens, it's only going to make things that much worse for the rest of us. Three and a half months in, and I'm already planning my exit strategy; oy vey.
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There was someone similar to that working at my company--luckily they quit at the end of last year. Never actually wanted to do work, but give it to other people, and then blabber endlessly with managers and higher-ups to show that they were better than other folks. I reported that person to HR (which I think I posted about in here) and eventually some other people did too and that's why they quit.

On my current front, I talked to my new boss this morning and feel better about my "new" position. And that meeting I have with the CIO? Oh yeah, she resigned today. Lol.
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I'm kind of hoping I can line up some other job before the boss makes me haul out to Orlando in June and blow a perfectly good weekend attending a conference about internal software that I could just read the documentation for instead.
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Best time to search for a new job is when you have a job. The hardest part I've found about looking for a new/different job is to not get caught up trying to find exactly the same job you're doing now. Look for stuff that interests you--a friend once told me a quote (I don't remember who from) that essentially said, even if you're not sure if you're qualified, get the job first, then learn what you don't know about the job. Fake it 'til you make it, basically.
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(04-15-2019, 02:44 PM)martianman Wrote: Best time to search for a new job is when you have a job. 

1000x this.

Plus, employers, right or wrong, heavily pre-screen based upon whether you are currently employed.
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Last day at my current job, starting a new one on Monday. Going to have better pay and better hours so I'm looking forward to the change. Had my exit interview yesterday which went well. Never had that opportunity before, more companies should utilize these as I felt it was a good process. I gave fair and balanced feedback which I feel HR appreciated. It would be easy for it to turn into a rant but I touched on the good and the bad without launching into personal attacks.

I had told my manager months ago that I was looking for new work. They were very understanding about my wanting to leave, but there was an odd moment. About a month ago we had a sit down where they asked if I would be better at my current company with lower responsibilities. I feel like I was doing a good job and asked if the company wanted me in my current position. They stumbled over their words and made it clear they didn't want me in my position, but they weren't going to out right demote me. I told them this just re-enforced my desire to seek alternative employment. A few weeks later I gave my notice. I've never heard of that strategy before where an employee wants to leave and the company counters with the offer of a demotion.
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Exit interviews can be great. If nothing else, you can reinforce the 'leaving on good terms' aspect of the job transition and verify that they'll provide a good reference for you in the future. They're also good for planting a seed that you'd be willing to come back to the company under different circumstances.

I'll never forget one exit interview where they kinda made a counter-offer on the spot to try and keep me. 'Thanks, but you had the opportunity to do this when I submitted my notice.' They then claimed that they didn't know the reasons why I was leaving until that moment, which was bullshit. It was flattering, though.
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(05-31-2019, 11:56 AM)Judas Booth Wrote: Exit interviews can be great.  If nothing else, you can reinforce the 'leaving on good terms' aspect of the job transition and verify that they'll provide a good reference for you in the future. 


Ha haa haaaa! NEVER! BURN THE BRIDGES AND SALT THE EARTH SO NOTHING EVER GROWS AGAAAIIIIN!


[he typed, from his desk at the company he's worked at for 19 uninterrupted years]
If you're happy, you're not paying attention.

Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny: 
Glad that you guys worked that out amongst yourselves.

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Is getting fired like an exit interview? If so, I've had a few.
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(05-31-2019, 11:56 AM)Judas Booth Wrote: Exit interviews can be great.  If nothing else, you can reinforce the 'leaving on good terms' aspect of the job transition and verify that they'll provide a good reference for you in the future.  They're also good for planting a seed that you'd be willing to come back to the company under different circumstances.

I'll never forget one exit interview where they kinda made a counter-offer on the spot to try and keep me.  'Thanks, but you had the opportunity to do this when I submitted my notice.'  They then claimed that they didn't know the reasons why I was leaving until that moment, which was bullshit.  It was flattering, though.

The one exit interview I've had went well. It was funny, they asked about my supervisor and I said "well, although I wasn't direct to him until a month ago, I've been dealing with Ken for over a decade and he is fair and a tremendous asset to the company - his guys love him, and he will never hang you out to dry." 

"Well, Ken has only been in that position for a month. You worked under Erik for a couple years prior to him, what about him?" 

I may have asked "do you really want me to answer that?" and after they said yes, I told them he was without a doubt the worst supervisor I'd ever had and should have never been in that position. The HR person kinda smiled and said "well, that isn't the first time we've heard that." So natch, he'd been PROMOTED out of his position and is probably still fucking up things at that company to this day.

A Hawaiian shirt is like a cash gift - always appropriate
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So the printer ran out of toner last week.  We went to the receptionist to ask where the spare toner is kept, she said "you have to log a ticket with IT for that."  (The IT dept. is now contracted out to a 3rd party.)

So we log a ticket.  The IT guy (back east) gets back to us, and says they don't have anybody working on-site in our office right now, and that we have to change it ourselves.  However, the room where the toner is kept, is locked, and IT took the key when their last guy quit.

There's a maintenance guy here that has the key, but he won't let us in because he "can't interfere with IT policy."

SO instead they're shipping a replacement toner cartridge out from a thousand miles away.  Should be here next week.

This is where I work now.
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(08-29-2019, 03:05 PM)somewhere Wrote: So the printer ran out of toner last week.  We went to the receptionist to ask where the spare toner is kept, she said "you have to log a ticket with IT for that."  (The IT dept. is now contracted out to a 3rd party.)

So we log a ticket.  The IT guy (back east) gets back to us, and says they don't have anybody working on-site in our office right now, and that we have to change it ourselves.  However, the room where the toner is kept, is locked, and IT took the key when their last guy quit.

There's a maintenance guy here that has the key, but he won't let us in because he "can't interfere with IT policy."

SO instead they're shipping a replacement toner cartridge out from a thousand miles away.  Should be here next week.

This is where I work now.

Are you trapped in the script for Joe vs the Volcano?

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Things have been escalating in absurdity since our different offices consolidated into one building, under corporate rule. The toner incident is the most surreal so far.
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There is so much value in being geographically separate from management. My coworkers and I deal with so much less shit than the folks in the home office, just because we can ignore the unimportant and focus on getting actual work done...
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I have a 2nd interview at this other company this afternoon. I get to meet some execs and see how that goes over. According to the recruiter it's down to me and another guy, who he said "is probably asking for too much money." Which makes me wonder, am I asking for enough money? Lol. The main guy in finance here yesterday sent out this outrageous declaration and included all the heads of finance and the controller in it. It's a requirement that was never brought up during the 18 months of this project but now is the most important thing ever in the history of the company (according to him). And I'm 99.9% sure it's a user education thing and not an "issue". One of the many reasons I want out of here. Finance is in over their heads so they're trying to dump anything they can on other teams.
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