Thread Rating:
  • 3 Vote(s) - 3.67 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
The Republican Party Going Forward v 2.0
(05-31-2021, 07:27 PM)Iron Maiden Wrote: https://twitter.com/samthielman/status/1...9456905217

[Image: E2wMGrlXEAAcg1n?format=jpg&name=small]

No no no . . . they knew who he was and what he did and the appreciations were genuine.
If I could change to liquid, I'd fill the cracks and bend the rocks.
Reply
Well, that didn't take long:

https://www.bloodyelbow.com/2021/6/2/224...c-mma-news

Quote:Tito Ortiz’s rocky stint as a Huntington Beach city council member has come to an end, just six months into his term. The Mayor Pro Tem made his announcement on Tuesday, claiming he’d been a victim of “character assassination” that now involves his family.

.....

Ortiz has been a controversial figure even before he was elected into office in December. The UFC Hall-of-Famer had been vocal about his stance against mask-wearing and his support for far-right extremist groups. He’d also done his fair share of spreading conspiracy theories about the COVID-19 pandemic.

Most recently, “The Huntington Beach Bad Boy” filed for unemployment despite his Mayor Pro Tem job and a couple of business endeavors.
Reply
Making government function properly is just not in the cards for Wisconsin Republicans - and everywhere else for that matter.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/...d=msedgntp

Quote:Republicans who control the Legislature's budget-writing committee scrapped Gov. Tony Evers' plan Wednesday to hand the Department of Workforce Development $15 million to improve how it administers unemployment benefits.

The agency has been plagued by lengthy delays in getting checks to people who have lost their jobs since the COVID-19 pandemic began last year. According to the nonpartisan Legislative Fiscal Bureau, the department was taking two weeks to adjudicate applicants' eligibility details as of mid-May, up from nine days in the first week of March. Appeals were taking an average of 78 days to process as of mid-May, up from 74 days in the first week of March.

Evers' 2021-23 budget would have given the department $15 million to bolster administrative efforts and would have made the appropriation permanent going forward.

Republicans on the budget committee erased the proposal Wednesday. Committee co-chairman Rep. Mark Born told reporters before the vote that if Evers wants to improve unemployment benefit administration he should use federal aid. Wisconsin is in line to receive about $2.5 billion in pandemic relief funds under the federal American Rescue Plan Act of 2021.
Reply
A never-Trumper wondering just what the GOP even stands for nowadays:

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archiv...on/619036/

Quote:American conservatism once meant something definite and tangible. You could fight those beliefs and policies; you could argue with them, admire them, or hate them. But they existed. Strom Thurmond, Ronald Reagan, Howard Baker, and Edward Brooke were not necessarily deep thinkers, and they didn’t all agree on everything. But the GOP held clear lines of thought that stood as alternatives to liberalism.

.....

The self-assurance of the Republicans who emerged from the post-Watergate wilderness might seem impossible to comprehend now that the modern GOP is rife with know-nothings and apocalyptic hysterics. But their confidence in their own ideas was unassailable—indeed, often to an unhealthy degree.

All of that is gone. Today’s Republicans exist only to stay in power, not least so that their elected officials can avoid what they dread most: being sent home to live among their constituents. The conservative writer George Will is right that the Republican Party in 2021 has become “something new in American history,” a “political party defined by the terror it feels for its own voters.”

Republican legislators should be scared. Their base is an angry white minority that cares nothing about government; its members want their elected officials to rule by hook or by crook, the Constitution and democracy itself be damned, and they don’t want any guff about namby-pamby ideas or policies. They want the elections controlled, the institutions captured, and the libs owned. The rest, to them, is just noise.

The survival instinct that this white-minority rage has triggered in craven Republican politicians is how the GOP mutated from a party championing individual liberty into a movement pushing monstrously statist authoritarianism. It is how the party of limited government began agitating for government truth ministries. It is how the party of exuberant free marketeers became a cabal of crony capitalists and knee-jerk protectionists. It is how the party that once fought Kremlin expansionism provided top cover for Russian intelligence attacks against U.S. institutions.

Republicans have tried to argue that if they are not in power, the Democrats and their ultraliberal allies will destroy our system of government and create a majoritarian nightmare. We must stay in power, they mewl, so that democracy itself will survive long enough to outlive the encroaching authoritarianism of the left.

These defenses are risible nonsense in the wake of Trump’s constitutional mayhem and the GOP’s descent into conspiratorial lunacy. But even on their own terms, Republican excuses are little more than lightly veiled defenses of minority rule. The GOP long ago abandoned any effort to convince women, people of color, immigrants, and others that the party had a place for them. Instead, Republicans in Congress have surrendered to the ignorance and racism of their most extreme voters in exchange for a continued life of privilege inside the comforting embrace of the Capital Beltway.
Reply
(05-31-2021, 07:28 PM)commodorejohn Wrote: Gonna be honest here, if 101 Dalmatians was a cornerstone of your sexual identity, you've probably got a lot bigger issues.

[Image: 4hqm.gif]
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
Reply
(06-03-2021, 10:49 PM)Iron Maiden Wrote: A never-Trumper wondering just what the GOP even stands for nowadays:

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archiv...on/619036/

Yeah I read that and it's summation of why the Republicans do what they do is fucking perfect: They're terrified of having to live with their constituents.  That is the hilarious irony of watching Fucker Carlson rail against the "elite," and you know damn well that motherfucker would slit his own wrists than to eat at a Denny's.  If it ain't for publicity, Republicans want nothing to do with their stupid, dumb, ignorant, white base.  And I take a nihilistic glee knowing that no matter what happens, Repubs are fuck.  Nothing they do will be enough to satisfy their voters, and eventually they're gonna be eaten by them.  

Here's hoping I'll be in Japan by the time that happens.
"God moves in mysterious ways," they said. Maybe he is on your side, the way it all worked out. Remembering other Christmases, wishing for something, something important, something special. And this is it, baby boy Frankie Bono. You're alone now. All alone. The scream is dead. There's no pain. You're home again, back in the cold, black silence
Reply
It's adorable that these clowns still labor under the delusion that Reagan was some kind of revolutionary thought leader for their party. He was asleep at the wheel due to his own senility issues, downplayed an entirely different deadly disease, sold weapons to Iran of all places, raised taxes on the middle class, and implemented economic policies that to this day have flatlined the minimum wage.

He was just proto-Trump.

It's time to turn off "Stranger Things" and reexamine the '80s through a lens that's unclouded by nostalgia for a decade you either don't remember or know very little about.
Reply
To reuse the Forbidden Planet analogy I vocalized years ago....

DJT is the republican 'monster from the id'. He is all the gross things that republicans actually are, given flesh.

It could be argued that FoxNews is the Krell machinery that brought the form to life.

I hope we don't have to set the planetary reactor to overload to stop it.
I used to be with "it", but then they changed what "it" was. Now, what I'm with isn't "it", and what's "it" seems weird and scary to me.   -Grandpa Simpson
Reply
(06-04-2021, 11:39 AM)bradito Wrote: It's adorable that these clowns still labor under the delusion that Reagan was some kind of revolutionary thought leader for their party. He was asleep at the wheel due to his own senility issues, downplayed an entirely different deadly disease, sold weapons to Iran of all places, raised taxes on the middle class, and implemented economic policies that to this day have flatlined the minimum wage.

He was just proto-Trump.

It's time to turn off "Stranger Things" and reexamine the '80s through a lens that's unclouded by nostalgia for a decade you either don't remember or know very little about.




Should be played in every high school history class.  The amount of people's whose sole understanding of the 80s is through fucking 80s action films is astounding.  And don't forget that his "War on Drugs" completely devastated the black community.
"God moves in mysterious ways," they said. Maybe he is on your side, the way it all worked out. Remembering other Christmases, wishing for something, something important, something special. And this is it, baby boy Frankie Bono. You're alone now. All alone. The scream is dead. There's no pain. You're home again, back in the cold, black silence
Reply
There's a two-part Dollop podcast, with special guest Patton Oswalt, about Reagan that's pretty disturbing but also further proof that the GOP always has been this bad.
Reply
Those governors don't care, sadly:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/...d=msedgntp

Quote:In addition to stripping a key lifeline from millions of jobless workers across the country, Republican governors' plans to prematurely cut off emergency unemployment benefits could cost local economies an estimated $12 billion as previously covered individuals and families lose the extra $300 in weekly federal aid they were using to buy groceries and other necessities.

According to a report (pdf) released Wednesday by the Joint Economic Committee, a congressional panel chaired by Rep. Don Beyer (D-Va.), the decision by dozens of Republican governors to cut off the $300-per-week boost to unemployment insurance "will take over $755 million from UI beneficiaries and their families on average."

"These numbers, while rough estimates, nonetheless probably understate the extent of the economic loss caused by this decision," the report reads. "By ending these programs early, states are refusing billions of already appropriated federal dollars that could be spent in local groceries, restaurants, and retail shops."
Reply
It's almost like the current conservative movement of the U.S. GOP is full of shameless self-promoters or something:

https://twitter.com/MattMackowiak/status...2601920517

Quote:It is now clear that @AllenWest’s entire tenure as @TexasGOP chair was intended to do only what many suspected: Provide him a platform for his political future, not an opportunity to build the party.

Allen West inherited a strong party passed down from the heroic efforts of Steve Munisteri, ably transitioned and sustained by the work ethic of successor @jamesdickey after Tom Mechler’s failed reign.

Now, the party is in the weakest financial position in at least 10 years.

For 7+ months, our state chair has been unconscionably attacking our statewide officials, rallying with Alex Jones at the Governor’s mansion, attacking our new Speaker, and doing the rhetorical work of Texas Democrats.

Now we are locked in to an obscene and wholly unnecessary security contract at TX GOP.

Our field effort is decimated.

We’ve done NOTHING to continue our massively effective voter registration effort.

And RPT lost its finest executive director in Kyle Whatley.

Allen West has always been all about himself, leaving disaster in his wake: military career, Congress, NCPA, now RPT. 

Our next @TexasGOP chair should be focused, serious, selfless, hard working, strategic & disciplined, unlike our soon to be former chair.
Reply
"...focused, serious, selfless, hard working, strategic & disciplined."

These are not terms used to describe a Republican. Accurately anyway.
Reply
Here's the reason for Mackowiak's post:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/...d=msedgntp

Quote:Allen West, the chair of the Texas Republican party who branded the party with a QAnon-sounding slogan, announced his resignation suddenly on Friday.

“Lt. Col. Allen West will take this opportunity to prayerfully reflect on a new chapter in his already distinguished career,” read a release from the party. “We know that wherever he goes next, he will continue to be a bulwark against progressive socialism and a champion for the principles of Texas and our American Republic.”

He will remain at the helm of the party until July 11th when a new chair will be chosen, the release added.

West took over the chairmanship about a year ago, after making his political name in the U.S. House of Representatives on Tea Party politics and inflammatory comments including calling former President Barack Obama a “low-level Socialist agitator” and accusing vast swaths of the Democratic party of being communists.
Reply
(06-04-2021, 10:41 PM)Iron Maiden Wrote: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/...d=msedgntp

Quote:Allen West, the chair of the Texas Republican party who branded the party with a QAnon-sounding slogan, announced his resignation suddenly on Friday.

“Lt. Col. Allen West will take this opportunity to prayerfully reflect on a new chapter in his already distinguished career,” read a release from the party. “We know that wherever he goes next, he will continue to be a bulwark against progressive socialism and a champion for the principles of Texas and our American Republic.”


Knowing absolutely nothing else about the man or this situation, holy shit is that not language that follows around anyone that has done anything remotely defensible at any point, ever.
Reply
A great read on everything the GOP is doing on the state level throughout the U.S.

https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/arc...ce=twitter

Quote:This surge of polarizing legislation is being driven largely by a combination of confidence and fear. Many observers believe that Republican legislators feel emboldened after Democrats in the 2020 election failed to record the state legislative gains they expected. In 2018, as part of the recoil from Trump, Democrats made significant gains in state legislatures, winning control of six legislative chambers and netting more than 300 seats nationwide, many in the white-collar suburbs of major metro areas. But despite unprecedented investment in local races, and Biden’s win at the presidential level, the party did not flip any additional chambers last year; Republicans, on net, gained back about half as many seats as they had lost two years earlier and came out of the election with control of both legislative chambers in 30 states, compared with just 18 for Democrats (with one additional state divided and Nebraska officially nonpartisan).

Democrats’ failure at the state level in 2020 has encouraged GOP legislators to pursue a more aggressive agenda, many observers say. The dynamic is perhaps most visible in Texas. After Democrats won several suburban seats and narrowed the GOP advantage in the Texas State House in 2018, the diminished Republican majority largely muted social issues and focused on bread-and-butter concerns, such as education, during the 2019 session. The GOP’s focus shifted back toward cultural issues after Democrats failed to make the further gains both sides anticipated in November. “All the expectations in Texas just didn’t happen, so the Republican Party emerged with a kind of renewed confidence,” says James Henson, who directs the Texas Politics Project at the University of Texas at Austin.

Republicans’ confidence, Henson adds, was also “bolstered” by a practical consequence of their 2020 success at holding both of Texas’s legislative chambers: In that state, as in virtually all of the states turning right this year, Republicans will control the decennial redistricting process. The ability to draw districts that favor them next year reduces their concern about a general-election backlash against their moves even in swing suburban areas. Carisa Lopez, the political director of the Texas Freedom Network, which works to organize young people there, told me, “For progressive organizations … [Republicans] have been coming at us from all angles, and it has been exhausting. They have done almost everything they can.”

GOP legislators appear to be operating more out of fear that Trump’s base of non-college-educated, rural, and evangelical white voters will punish them in primaries if they fail to pursue maximum confrontation against Democrats and liberal constituencies, particularly on issues revolving around culture and race. “Very few of the districts are competitive [in a general election], so all they are worried about is being primaried,” says John Geer, a political-science professor at Vanderbilt University in Tennessee, one of the states that have advanced the most aggressive conservative agenda this year. Glenn Smith, a longtime Democratic operative in Texas, notes that the state’s militantly conservative Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick has pushed legislators toward his priorities this year in part by persuading them that any moderation risks infuriating “an aggrieved Trump base who feels that the election was stolen from them, are fired up, and love the red meat on every issue.”
Reply
Not all is well in the Bush camp over George P. Bush's embrace of Trump.  Dad Jeb is "heartbroken," reportedly:

https://www.mediaite.com/online/jeb-is-h...gn-launch/

Quote:The recent campaign launch by a Bush family scion has upended their longstanding unity, causing heartbreak behind the scenes and even a rare public rebuke from a longtime Bush loyalist.

The Bushes have long been known for their conservative politics and loyalty to their inner circle. Political consultants and advisers for former President George H.W. Bush, former President George W. Bush, and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush often worked with them for a decade or more, remaining in close contact years after the time in elected office had come to an end.

George P. Bush, Jeb’s son, was elected as Texas Land Commissioner in 2014, his first elected office, and he easily won reelection in 2018. He was a frequent sight on the campaign trail for his father’s 2016 presidential campaign, as pictured above. This week, he announced that he would challenge incumbent Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton in 2022.

Bush’s campaign launch was notable in at least two ways: the lack of other Bushes and the direct appeal to former President Donald Trump. Neither of Bush’s parents, Jeb or Columba Bush, were present at his announcement speech, nor was his presidential uncle GWB. Jeb and Columba had attended a number of his previous campaign events. This reporter spoke with Jeb at George P.’s 2018 election night party in March 2018, and he had made comments about being a proud father seeing his son succeed.

Another noteworthy absence from George P. Bush’s campaign is other Bush alumni. Karl Rove, who served as W’s chief of staff, continues to advise GOP campaigns from his Austin-based consulting firm, but he is not involved in GPB’s AG campaign, and other recognizable names of still-active Republican consultants who worked for other Bushes have not been hired either.

.....

Rove dropped his own comment on the family divisions on Twitter Friday, tweeting a photo of the latest book he’s reading. “The perfect beach read…warm, deeply personal,” was Rove’s review of Jean Becker’s The Man I Knew: The Amazing Story of George H. W. Bush’s Post-Presidency.

Rove is not a prolific tweeter, posting something new usually only once every few days, and is known for being very deliberate and strategic in his communications.

“There is an enormous disturbance inside the Bush family” regarding George P.’s support for Trump, said one longtime Republican consultant who spoke to Mediaite on condition of anonymity. “Jeb is heartbroken,” he said, adding that he had heard the word heartbroken “repeatedly” in conversations this week with various Bush family insiders.

This consultant and another Republican strategist based in Texas (again speaking on condition on anonymity) both remarked that Rove’s tweet, about a book honoring the late patriarch of the Bush dynasty, should be viewed as a rebuke of George P.’s schism from the family.
Reply
Ahahahaha! What a bunch of dopes.
Reply
(06-04-2021, 12:24 PM)bradito Wrote: There's a two-part Dollop podcast, with special guest Patton Oswalt, about Reagan that's pretty disturbing but also further proof that the GOP always has been this bad.

I looked this podcast up and it's both horrifying and laugh out loud hilarious.

Reagan was a high order asshole but he is so much worse than you would think.

https://allthingscomedy.com/podcast/the-...t-part-1-1
I used to be with "it", but then they changed what "it" was. Now, what I'm with isn't "it", and what's "it" seems weird and scary to me.   -Grandpa Simpson
Reply
I’ve been planning on listening to that tomorrow morning.
If I could change to liquid, I'd fill the cracks and bend the rocks.
Reply
We were all so drunk on the '80s at the time that we overlooked so much of what Reagan was doing. Plus so many people wanted a rah-rah president after how shitty a decade the '70s were.
Just this guy, you know?
Reply
There's another Bush? Lord help us. Like Gremlins those guys.

Reply
(06-05-2021, 03:15 PM)vtran Wrote:
(06-04-2021, 12:24 PM)bradito Wrote: There's a two-part Dollop podcast, with special guest Patton Oswalt, about Reagan that's pretty disturbing but also further proof that the GOP always has been this bad.

I looked this podcast up and it's both horrifying and laugh out loud hilarious.

This is also true about pretty much every episode.
Reply
He finally got served:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/andrewsolen...4c3b5321bb

Quote:Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-Calif.) successfully served Rep. Mo Brooks (R-Ala.) with a lawsuit holding Brooks and other top Republicans “responsible for the injury and destruction” on Jan. 6 after initially failing to locate him – but Brooks alleged the server committed criminal trespassing, which Swalwell’s attorney denied.
Reply
Wait, the guy who's being sued for January 6th suddenly is concerned about criminal trespassing?

These fuckin' guys.
Reply
I don't think this will matter much, personally.  Republicans didn't even bother with a platform last year, and still got tons of votes:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/trumps-grieva...38084.html

Quote:Republicans are fighting to seize control of Congress. Just don't ask what they'd do if they win.

Look no further for evidence of the GOP's muddled governing agenda than battleground North Carolina, where party leaders packed into a convention hall Saturday night to cheer former President Donald Trump. Even with a high-stakes U.S. Senate election looming, the Republicans there were united not by any consistent set of conservative policies or principles, but by Trump's groundless grievances about the 2020 election and his attacks against critics in both parties.

The lack of a forward-looking agenda stands in stark contrast to successful midterm elections of past years, particularly 1994 and 2010, when Republicans swept into power after staking clear positions on health care, federal spending and crime, among other issues. Without such a strategy heading into 2022, Republicans on the ballot risk allowing themselves to be wholly defined by Trump, who lost his last election when he drew 7 million fewer votes nationally than Democrat Joe Biden and who has seen his popularity slide further, even among some Republicans, since leaving office in January.

“I’m unaware of a GOP agenda. I would love to see one,” said Texas-based conservative activist and former tea party leader Mark Meckler.

“Nobody knows what they’re about,” he said of today's Republicans. “They do this at their own peril.”

The GOP’s embrace of Trump’s self-serving priorities has almost completely consumed the party’s long-standing commitment to fiscal discipline, free markets and even the rule of law. That leaves Republican candidates from North Carolina to North Dakota unwilling or unable to tell voters how they would address the nation’s biggest challenges if given the chance.
Reply
TFW your entire platform is, "I'm a Trump supporter!"
Reply
It's hard to top Greene demanding stuff on a date that doesn't exist, but Mo Brooks posting a photo of his computer where his email password is clearly visible is certainly in the running for "dumbassery of the week."

https://twitter.com/RepMoBrooks/status/1...4220861453

Quote:@EricSwalwell Well, Swalwell FINALLY did his job, served complaint (on my WIFE).

HORRIBLE Swalwell’s team committed a CRIME by unlawfully sneaking INTO MY HOUSE & accosting my wife!

Alabama Code 13A-7-2: 1st degree criminal trespass. Year in jail. $6000 fine.

More to come!

[Image: E3N3YWTWQAMIByi?format=jpg&name=900x900]
Reply
And you can go back even further than Reagan... Nixon created the modern Republican Party by thirsting for power so greatly that he ran a campaign of dog whistles to bring in southern voters who decided Democrats weren't racist enough for them any longer. Toss in Nixon's well-known paranoia, his election cheating, and his previous OUTRIGHT TREASON in working to sabotage Vietnam peace talks because they'd hurt his election chances, and it's clear that Trump isn't the problem.

The real problem has existed since at least 1968, and it's that 1/3rd of the people in this country are terrible, and another 1/3rd don't vote.
Gamertag: Tweakee
Reply
Well, hopefully, he'll lose!

https://www.mississippifreepress.org/128...s-earlier/

Quote:Batesville mayoral candidate Eddie Nabors traveled to Washington, D.C., as Donald Trump sought to overturn the 2020 presidential election on Jan. 6. Social-media posts also show that, in November, he marched in a group that included The Proud Boys, a far-right extremist organization. Some members of The Proud Boys, federal investigators say, later helped orchestrate and carry out the attack on the U.S. Capitol.

It is unclear whether Nabors, who won the Republican primary to run for mayor in April, was near the Capitol during the Jan. 6 insurrection; he did not respond to repeated requests for comment since Thursday. But he was in town at the time along with his adult daughter, Laura Nabors, a post on his personal Facebook page says.

“Just arrived in D.C. Went to the room and came back to the lobby for refreshments and senator Mastriano stopped and talked to Laura and me for 15 minutes,” reads a Facebook post from Nabors, referring to Pennsylvania State Sen. Doug Mastriano, on his personal Facebook page. “I’m sure it was my charm that made him stay.”
Reply
Arizona's state audit seems to be driving people away from the state GOP:

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/07/us/po...cracy.html

Quote:The Republican State Senate’s autopsy of the 2020 vote, broadly seen as a shambolic, partisan effort to nurse grievances about Donald J. Trump’s loss here in November, risks driving away some of the very people the party needs to win statewide elections in 2022.

That Arizona Republicans are ignoring that message — and that Republicans in other states are now trying to mount their own Arizona-style audits — raises worrisome questions not just about their strategy, but about its impact on an American democracy facing fundamental threats.

Now in its seventh week, the review of 2.1 million votes in Arizona’s most populous county has ballooned not just into a national political spectacle, but also a political wind sock for the Republican Party — an early test of how its renewed subservience to Mr. Trump would play with voters.

The returns to date are not encouraging for the party. A late-May poll of 400 Arizonans by the respected consulting firm HighGround Inc. found that more than 55 percent of respondents opposed the recount, most of them strongly. Fewer than 41 percent approved of it. By about 45 to 33 percent, respondents said they were less likely — much less, most said — to vote for a Republican candidate who supported the review.

The recount itself, troubled by procedural blunders and defections, has largely sacrificed any claim to impartiality. The Pennsylvania computer forensics firm that was conducting the hand recount of ballots quit without a clear explanation this month, adding further chaos to a count that election authorities and other critics say has been making up its rules as it went along.
Reply
Tell us how you really feel, Laffer:

https://twitter.com/LisPower1/status/140...7082528778

Quote:Fox guest Art Laffer: For those people who are coming into the labor force fresh, not oldtimers -- the poor, the minorities, the disenfranchised, those with less education, young people who haven't had the job experience -- these people aren't worth $15 an hour in most cases

Video at the link.
Reply
What do these stupid assholes think all those different types people do with money? Eat it?

If you give people money, they'll spend it. Doesn't the economy only work if people buy shit? Isn't that what we're here for? It sure ain't the terrestrial radio.
Reply
The Libertarian Party of New Hampshire had its own take recently:

https://twitter.com/LPNH/status/1401991776030887940

Quote:Legalize child labor.

Children will learn more on a job site than in public school.

At the very least, the minimum age to work is a states' rights issue.

Federal minimum work ages are unconstitutional.

Child labor laws don't prevent 4-year-olds from working in the coal mines, they prevent 14-year-olds from working in flower shops.
Reply
"Children will learn more on a job site than in public school."

I want to see this nimrod's high school transcript.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 4 Guest(s)