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The Republican Party Going Forward v 2.0
Florida and Arizona deservedly get a lot of shit for having the dumbest residents (or at least ones with the least amount of common sense) but after the last few years, I think Kentucky and Iowa get my vote for Dumbest Fucking Residents in the Country.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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I grew up in Iowa until I was 15, and I can say that there's broad spectrum of people there just like in any other place in the country.  King's district just happens to be in the northwest portion of the state that runs absurdly red.

ETA: It likely doesn't help that the majority of the best and brightest from the state likely head out of state either for college or right after college.  The majority of people with whom I grew up who attended college fall into that category.  Only a handful remained in Iowa, and they're all mostly in eastern Iowa.

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I had some amazing experiences in Alabama and Florida, and I grew up in Tennessee. However, I'm afraid the days of "THAT'S the region where all the stupid people are" is long gone.
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(08-15-2019, 12:11 AM)Iron Maiden Wrote: Ben Shapiro had himself a day too:

https://www.mediaite.com/online/ben-shap...-kid-says/

So many people actively choose to have Ben Shapiro's shrill nasally voice piped directly into their earholes on a daily basis.  Baffling.  If anyone deserves to get stuffed into a locker, its him.  

Anyway, Ben's got a real big boy job - shilling food stockpiles to prepper weirdos who fantasize about the collapse of society and living in a bunker with their guns:

 [Image: EB9_uS5XoAICwSj.jpg]
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Laugh all you want, but the Patriot Pantry Mac n' Cheese casserole is delicious.  Their secret?  I think it's the nutmeg.
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Patriot Pantry? JFC.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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(08-15-2019, 12:53 PM)MichaelM Wrote: Patriot Pantry? JFC.

You think that's bad?  They sell this shit in "ammo" crates.
[Image: 61R9ybTN6gL._SX425_.jpg]
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The ONLY way that gets worse is if the food inside is non-perishable Taco Bell. That it appears to be semi-real(ish) food inside is the only evidence I have that we aren't in the Idiocracy timeline.

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(08-15-2019, 01:38 PM)sean blackwell Wrote: The ONLY way that gets worse is if the food inside is non-perishable Taco Bell.  That it appears to be semi-real(ish) food inside is the only evidence I have that we aren't in the Idiocracy timeline.

Is there such a thing as a GTA timeline because if so, we might be in that
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"Press the Issue with your host Maurice Chavez."
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It just reminds me of that absurd kind of on-the-outside-looking-in satire that Rockstar specializes in (except of course it is real!). Like maybe you'll hear a radio ad for it after jacking a car.

"Because you can't spell America without M, R, and E..."
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It's not everyday that a governor is sued by his hand-picked lieutenant governor, but today is not everyday:

https://wfpl.org/lt-gov-hampton-is-suing...-staffers/

Quote:Lt. Gov. Jenean Hampton has filed a lawsuit against Gov. Matt Bevin over the firings of two of her staffers earlier this year.

The development is the latest in the ongoing battle between the former Republican allies after Bevin didn’t select Hampton to be on his re-election ticket.

In the 12-page complaint, Hampton argues that Bevin doesn’t have the authority to fire employees in her office and asks the court to restore her former staffers.

“There is no monetary value, no price, which can be placed upon each day of the Lieutenant Governor’s term,” Hampton’s attorney Joshua Harp wrote in the complaint.
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West Virginia Republican Gov. Jim Justice owns a resort named The Greenbrier. When lobbyists and state agencies book there, he profits, ProPublica reports. The ownership has "created a host of conflicts of interest."

And that's just the beginning:

https://www.propublica.org/article/west-...ttle-trump

Quote:All told, more than $1 million — half of the inaugural fund — went to Justice’s Greenbrier Hotel Corp., according to financial reports filed with the secretary of state’s office.

State ethics officials have described the arrangement as perfectly legal. Private dollars funded the event, and no public money flowed to the inaugural committee. But they also say West Virginia laws never contemplated someone like Jim Justice.

With his decision to hold the ball at The Greenbrier, Justice ushered in a new era of politics in West Virginia, one in which it’s hard to tell where the governor’s business interests end and state government begins.

The billionaire now faces a complicated ethical landscape with striking similarities to the entanglements surrounding his Republican political ally, President Donald Trump. A corporate executive whose most recent financial disclosure listed 130 separate business entities, Justice early in his term said he had turned over day-to-day control of his businesses to his adult children. But, like Trump, he stopped short of placing most of his assets in a blind trust that would have shielded him from at least the appearance of conflicts.

Today, Justice’s coal mines are inspected by the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection and the Office of Miners’ Health, Safety and Training, agencies whose top employees the governor appoints. And his casino is regulated by West Virginia’s Lottery Commission, another agency under the chief executive’s control.

The Greenbrier represents only a slice of Justice’s holdings, estimated by Forbes to be worth as much as $1.5 billion. But the iconic resort’s outsized role in West Virginia politics has made it an unparalleled ethical thicket for the governor.

Before taking office, Justice benefited from a number of state agencies, as well as special interest groups, using his resort to host marquee meetings, retreats and conferences. In 2015, the state spent more than $260,000 there. So, to avoid conflicts of interest as governor, his administration says it imposed a “moratorium” on state spending at The Greenbrier.

But a Charleston Gazette-Mail and ProPublica investigation has found that Justice continues to profit from state business, with agencies spending more than $106,000 at his resort since he took office. The Tourism Office features The Greenbrier in a state advertising campaign that launched last year.

Meanwhile, some of West Virginia’s most powerful trade groups are increasingly picking up the food and lodging tabs for lawmakers, as well as top state agency officials subject to the administration’s spending ban, according to a review of lobbyist disclosure reports filed with the state Ethics Commission. Outlays from the state Chamber of Commerce, for instance, more than tripled during Justice’s first year in office.

And as The Greenbrier has faced serious financial pressures, from a major flood and a legal battle with insurers, Justice has used the power of his office to help ensure its survival.

Last year, as the state’s chief executive, he decided to include The Greenbrier in a federal “opportunity zone.” Intended to help underdeveloped communities, the designation makes new investments in the targeted area eligible for lucrative tax breaks.

At the same time, Justice and Greenbrier officials sought additional assistance from Greenbrier County, where the resort has long been the largest employer. Working together, they pressed county commissioners to set aside more than $10 million in taxpayer funds to finance or jump-start projects related to The Greenbrier. The proposed upgrades range from a new laundry to a long-planned ski area.
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Mike Pence is planning to "celebrate his Irish roots" with a multi-day stay in Ireland...but Twitter ain't havin' it:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/mike-pence-ir...14823.html

(...Um, Pence DOES know that the Irish PM is openly gay, correct?)
"These guys are pros, Michael. They're gonna push the tension 'till the last possible moment before they strip."

 
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(08-15-2019, 05:01 PM)Iron Maiden Wrote: West Virginia Republican Gov. Jim Justice owns a resort named The Greenbrier. When lobbyists and state agencies book there, he profits, ProPublica reports. The ownership has "created a host of conflicts of interest."

And that's just the beginning:

https://www.propublica.org/article/west-...ttle-trump

I don't ever want to hear assholes like this say a negative word about people who need government assistance.  The hypocrisy is astonishing.

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(08-16-2019, 09:03 AM)leto ii Wrote: Mike Pence is planning to "celebrate his Irish roots" with a multi-day stay in Ireland...but Twitter ain't havin' it:
Pence in Ireland: "Well, this boiled-cabbage stuff is just about my speed, but...I'm afraid Mother just can't abide all this drinking."
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(08-15-2019, 09:49 AM)sean blackwell Wrote: I grew up in Iowa until I was 15, and I can say that there's broad spectrum of people there just like in any other place in the country.  King's district just happens to be in the northwest portion of the state that runs absurdly red.

ETA: It likely doesn't help that the majority of the best and brightest from the state likely head out of state either for college or right after college.  The majority of people with whom I grew up who attended college fall into that category.  Only a handful remained in Iowa, and they're all mostly in eastern Iowa.

Funny story — the new, first-year teacher in the classroom immediately next door to my own at the high school in Illinois where I work just graduated from Iowa State in May, but got the hell out the state to start her career (she’s originally from Palatine, IL, in the Chi-suburbs). Anecdotal, but seems to bear this particular theory out, too.
"These guys are pros, Michael. They're gonna push the tension 'till the last possible moment before they strip."

 
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Why do Republicans who criticize Trump in private stick by him?  Well, the grift is nice. But, yeah, it's also because - as you guys already know - Trump is the base rolled into one person:

https://rantt.com/the-real-reason-republ...ble-trump/

Quote:Well, according to Occam’s Razor, the answer with the fewest assumptions is probably the right one. Consider for a second who Trump is. He’s an older white man with money, whose days are planned around an unhealthy diet of right-wing conspiracy theories and pundits delivering new outrage fuel, animated by half-remembered grievances. He argues in piecemeal, often incorrect, completely out of context factoids. He’s animated by a sense of wounded pride coupled with delusions of grandeur. And he has a very hefty dollop of racial animus carried over from the Civil Rights era he’s happy to expand on in a heartbeat, usually with a dyspeptic grimace as he vomits a torrent of bile on anyone who isn’t a mirror image of himself.

You know who else fits the same description to a tee? Typical white boomer retirees who are the very bedrock of the Republican voting base. GOP lawmakers may cringe at his tweets, groan at his disregard for the measured dog whistles of yore in favor of full-blown bigotry and racist red meat, and even feel disgusted by him as an utterly depraved human being devoid of a single redeeming trait. But ultimately, when they look at him, they see the tens of millions of Trumps keeping them in office, ecstatic that one of them is president and they can finally show the [ insert plural versions of assorted ethnic and misogynistic slurs here ] who’s in charge. And so they swallow their rage, adjust their ties, put on their best excrement-devouring grins, and go out there to #MAGA.
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And when we finally show that we're pissed enough to consistently outvote that fetid base, those guys will pull a 180 so fast they might lose one of their faces.

But like most instances of complicity in campaigns of terror and evil, people will have long memories of them. And the Internet will never forget who they really are.
Gamertag: Tweakee
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The commentary site Quillette recently fell for a hoax about a white, self-described Marxist-Leninist, construction worker who ended up being repulsed by the Democratic Socialists of America because they were hoity-toity people who talked about feminism all the time.  That person does not exist, but the right ran with the story.

Aaron Freedman took this story as a starting to point to make some great points about what the working class really thinks about conservative ideas:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2...ing-class/

Quote:Archie Carter, a construction worker from Queens, is a self-described Marxist-Leninist. Not long ago, he joined the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), only to be repulsed by its overeducated, elitist members who cared more about “feminist procedures” and “fashionable intersectionality” than “real people” like him.

At least, this is what Archie claimed in an essay titled “DSA is Doomed,” published last week — and retracted soon after — by the commentary site Quillette. For the right-leaning pundits who deride today’s socialists as politically correct coastal posers, this narrative resonated. Archie Carter — a “real live worker (!)” as Sam Adler-Bell cheekily put it — had confirmed what they had long suspected

There was just one problem. Archie Carter was neither real nor live, nevermind a worker. The essay was a hoax perpetrated by a 24-year-old “left populist” in Illinois, who later told me and other journalists that he intended to reveal the right-wing bias of Quillette, which brands itself as an unbiased, nonideological “platform for free thought.” 

But this isn’t just a story of a clever guy outwitting lax fact-checkers and revealing a site’s conservative biases. It also sheds light on the way right-leaning commentators depend on the voice of an imagined white working class to legitimize and advance their own viewpoints — viewpoints that are often opposed to those of the real working class. And it’s not just websites like Quillette that fall for that hoax. Politicians and voters buy into this imagined narrative, too.

As Tom Scocca wrote in Slate, political commentators across the media spectrum regularly invoke the concerns of “real” or “ordinary” people in response to progressive policy proposals deemed to be too costly or too radical or — implicitly — too anti-racist for “the heartland.” This framework is so common that it is almost invisible. But we can still glimpse it when, for example, CNN’s Dana Bash asks Democratic candidates whether providing undocumented immigrants with free health care and free college might “drive even more people to come to the U.S. illegally.” Or when Bret Stephens writes in the New York Times that immigrant-friendly policies make “ordinary people” feel like “strangers in their own country.”

The implicit — and sometimes explicit — assumption buried just below the surface of such questions and claims is that politicians only need to care about the supposed silent majority of white working-class Americans. The thinking also seems to suggest that these Americans are inevitably racist. Read mainstream conservative writers such as the Times’ Ross Douthat (“There’s another America. … It draws its social norms from the mores of the Anglo-Saxon diaspora — and it expects new arrivals to assimilate themselves to these norms, and quickly.”), or the Atlantic’s David Frum (“If Liberals Won’t Enforce Borders, Fascists Will: We need to make hard decisions now about what will truly benefit current and future Americans.”), and you’ll start to hear the supposed voice of an average, middle-of-the-road America that sounds little different from the suspected El Paso shooter. Before the gunman killed 22 people, authorities believe he wrote, “I am simply defending my country from cultural and ethnic replacement brought on by an invasion.”

This polity — white working class, racist, xenophobic, misogynist, homophobic — is just as imaginary as Archie Carter.

There’s no precise metric for defining the “working class,” but studies show that among workers without a college degree, whites are underrepresented — their share is rapidly declining — and women make up nearly half of the group. A report from the Working Poor Families Project shows an even starker gap between media rhetoric and reality: People of color make up 58 percent of low-income families. And the working class is increasingly made up of nurses and waiters rather than construction workers like the imaginary Archie. Seventy-six percent of the group are in the service industry, while only 21 percent work in the industrial sector.

The political and social views of the real working class could not be more out of step with how they’re often portrayed by the right: According to a recent poll by the Economist, low-income Americans are more likely than their middle- or upper-income counterparts to disapprove of President Trump’s immigration policies or call him a racist. They are also less inclined to think Trump cares about them at all. In 2016, working-class Americans swung for Hillary Clinton by a margin of roughly 10 percentage points.

If the Archie Carter stereotype of a bigoted working class is nothing more than fiction, why does it persist so stubbornly across the media spectrum? Because it allows the right to ascribe its own, often unpopular, ideas to an invented working class, hoping to rally broader support around what this fabled community of “real” Americans wants.

This strategy is nothing new. As Corey Robin, a scholar of conservatism, has argued, this goes back to the advent of modern democracy, when conservatives first struggled with the paradox of how “to make privilege popular.” This project can be felt around some of the most defining moments of recent America history, from the popular but bogus narrative that the working class supported the Vietnam War to the myth that Ronald Reagan represented the neglected interests of the everyday working American. (Reagan actually lost union and low-income households to Jimmy Carter.)

As Dylan Matthews wrote in Vox on the “Archie Carter” hoax, media outlets — even those with better fact-checking procedures than Quillette — are always at risk of publishing hoaxers. But Archie Carter did much more than reveal a website’s conservative tilt: He reminded us of the implicit bias, and fabrications, contained in so many of the political assumptions about the working class we hear across the media. Indeed, it was surely because his story aligned so clearly with the right’s fables about its supporters that his own fictions passed muster. Publishing a stupid article about a fake construction worker isn’t great. But signaling to an invented group of “real” Americans to bolster racist views? That’s the real hoax.
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The story gets better from there:

https://www.mediaite.com/tv/gop-congress...own-urine/
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^He's right. If he didn't swallow, it's not drinking the piss. Take that libtards!
I think these screen captures and giant (Dildi? Is there a plural?) are just the next step in the JJ Abrams online adventure series. Very slyly played, Bitches Leave.-Tom Fuchs
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Ben Shapiro just can't think of any Republican leaders ever questioning Obama's citizenship.  Nope, not one:

https://www.rawstory.com/2019/08/right-w...egitimacy/

Quote:On Monday, right-wing commentator Ben Shapiro made a head-turning claim: That President Donald Trump deserves respect because no Republicans ever questioned President Barack Obama’s legitimacy:

Confronted with the fact that Trump himself promulgated the “Birther” conspiracy theory that Obama wasn’t born in the United States, Shapiro pled No True Scotsman, insisting that Trump didn’t really count as a “Republican figure” back in the early 2010s when he was spreading Birther lies — and that Republican officeholders at the time didn’t agree with the delegitimization of the president.

Unfortunately for Shapiro, the internet was quick to pile on and point out that he was still wrong on both counts. Numerous elected Republican officials parroted Trump’s Birtherism, with dozens of GOP representatives cosponsoring a bill to force Obama to release his birth certificate in 2009. And far from being a “fringe figure,” a number of Republicans also expressed support for Trump running for president in 2012, including Shapiro himself.
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Haha its almost like the Koch's sign his paychecks or something
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lol

I picture him crying over a pint of Patriot Pantry cookies 'n cream
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Another oldie from Shapiro:

   
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Open bigotry from Rep. Mo Brooks:

https://twitter.com/_waleedshahid/status...0858068992

Quote:"Muslims more so than most people have great animosity towards Israel and the Jewish faith. As you have more and more Muslims in the US, as they gain greater and greater influence in elections...you’re going to see more people like Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib."
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Steve King's campaign is broke. He has just $18,365 on hand heading into a primary fight:

https://www.thedailybeast.com/steve-king...n?ref=home

Quote:As he gears up for a difficult re-election cycle, Rep. Steve King’s campaign is strapped for cash. Individual donations to the Iowa Republican have continued to flow but support from corporate donors and King’s own colleagues have vanished entirely.

King has not received a single contribution this year from a political action committee associated with a sitting member of Congress. Corporate PACs and interest groups have also completely shunned him. Through the first six months of the year, King received just two contributions from third party political entities: $2,000 donations from PACs associated with two former members of Congress, Lamar Smith (R-TX) and the infamous Todd Akin (R-MO).

It is a remarkable though not entirely unpredictable abandonment of a sitting member of Congress. Though he was always controversial and further to the right than most of his colleagues, King has burned virtually all his bridges in the party this year with outlandish comments about white supremacy and abortion.

But while those comments have made King a pariah in the party—with House Republican leaders stripping him of his committee assignments—King has refused to leave office. Now, as he faces the toughest campaign since he was first elected in 2002, he is doing so with a potentially catastrophic lack of resources. The $18,365 that King’s campaign had in the bank at the end of June was the least cash on hand he’s ever reported after the first six months of a cycle.

King is dealing with that lack of resources as he faces very immediate threats to his incumbency. His 2018 Democratic opponent, former professional baseball player J.D. Scholten, lost by fewer than three points last year, and is making another run for the seat. This time around King also has a formidable Republican primary opponent, state senator Randy Feenstra, who has already scored endorsements from influential Iowans such as evangelical leader Bob Vander Plaats. At the end of July, Feenstra’s campaign committee reported having $337,314.30 cash on hand, compared to King’s $18,000. 
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The removal of King from his committee seats was a political death sentence.  The return on investment from contributing to his campaign fund is nonexistent compared to that of whatever primary challenger might replace him on the ticket.  King no longer has enough power to be worth bribing.
"Looking at the Trump administration, I'm starting to think I was too hard on the characters in Prometheus."  --  MrBananaGrabber
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I mean, it's a disgrace that he wasn't hounded out of the party years ago, but fuck it, as long as he's gone.
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The Pence/Haley rivalry for the future of the Republican Party is intensifying:

https://www.politico.com/story/2019/08/2...mp-1474377

Quote:When top Republicans convened at the St. Regis resort in Aspen, Colo. last month for an exclusive donor retreat, several attendees said there was palpable tension in the room as the gathering’s two headliners prepared to speak: Vice President Mike Pence and former United Nations ambassador Nikki Haley.

The assembled group of governors, high-dollar donors, and operatives were well aware that the two have big ambitions; to some it seemed as if Pence and Haley, who spoke on back-to-back days, were vying for their attention. Some in the audience found themselves parsing and comparing the two speeches and buzzed they were getting a sneak preview of a 2024 Republican primary. Others recalled something peculiar: Neither Pence nor Haley acknowledged each other in their presentations, even though they gave shout-outs to others attending the retreat. 

At a time when Republicans are starting to contemplate what their party will look like after Donald Trump leaves office, a rivalry has developed between the two politicians who cut markedly different profiles — and signs of strain are bubbling to the surface. 

Pence and Haley aren't openly sniping: Publicly, both sides maintain there's nothing but mutual respect between them. But interviews with nearly two dozen top Republicans revealed that the opposing camps are closely tracking each other's moves, and remain deeply suspicious of one another.

The Pence team has recently asked senior Republicans for updates on Haley’s outreach to donors. And with Haley embarking on a national fundraising tour and promoting a new outside political group, top Pence advisers blame her for persistent rumors that she will replace him on the Trump's ticket in 2020. Tensions flared after Haley chose not to publicly repudiate a Wall Street Journal column in June urging Trump to put her on the ticket. 

Earlier this month, Haley took a swipe at Trump after his criticism of Baltimore and its black congressman, Elijah Cummings. “This is so unnecessary,” she wrote on Twitter, adding the eyeroll emoji. White House counselor and former Pence pollster Kellyanne Conway then fired back: “THIS is so unnecessary. Trump-PENCE2020,” Conway wrote of Haley’s tweet.
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WI Rep Sean Duffy is resigning in September: https://twitter.com/thehill/status/1166012842413371393

He's saying it's because he and his wife are expecting a child with a lot of health problems.
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(08-26-2019, 12:11 PM)Dent6084 Wrote: WI Rep Sean Duffy is resigning in September: https://twitter.com/thehill/status/1166012842413371393

He's saying it's because he and his wife are expecting a child with a lot of health problems.

Maybe he’s returning to his roots and joining next season’s cast of “The Challenge.”
PSN Handle: chetripley80
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