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KICK-ASS 2 post-release
#36

Death-by-cop? There's a scene after the credits.

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#37

Didn't stay for the post-credits GvR, but reading about it online TMF surviving doesn't change the fact that he wanted to die and wanted Kick-Ass to be responsible.

Don't make me write another 1,000 words, somehow using antediluvian and diegetic somewhere in there.

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#38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartleby_Scriven View Post

Didn't stay for the post-credits GvR, but reading about it online TMF surviving doesn't change the fact that he wanted to die and wanted Kick-Ass to be responsible.

Don't make me write another 1,000 words, somehow using antediluvian and diegetic somewhere in there.

Well it changes the fact that he did die to the fact that he didn't, 

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#39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartleby_Scriven View Post

Went into this with low expectations, considering the lukewarm reaction around these parts, and came away relatively pleased. I have a lot of goodwill toward the first one, mostly for its likable characters, clever stylization, and effective utilization of already existing music (both score and popular). The second one doesn't have a lot of new things to say, it's lost much of the clever style and production value as everything looks cheap this time around, and mostly coasts on the aforementioned goodwill. Still, Chloe Grace Moretz and Jim Carrey manage to instill real pathos in their characters and Aaron Taylor-Johnson continues to be an amiable audience surrogate, but what's somewhat pleasing but mostly wrongheaded about this movie and its spiritual predecessors Mystery Men and Watchmen is how it plays upon and subverts comic book tropes but not necessarily comic book MOVIE tropes.

What it comes down to is Millar's dialogue, and it's clear that this movie borrowed much more heavily from the books than the first did, only works on the page and there only just barely. The nature of comic book dialogue is that punchy one liners and operatic proclamations aren't accompanied by the dead air of characters reacting but the next panel having already moved on. Moments like "I'm gonna go Saudi Arabia on your ass and cut your hand off" feel like when actors pause after a punchline on sitcoms to let the laugh track kick in, but without that benefit the movie just lumbers along boldly hiding its own embarrassment. What Scott McCloud calls "closure" in his amazing Understanding Comics is the readers' ability to fill in the space between those panels, and something we've been trained to do since discovering floppy books is make this nonsense work in our heads. We soften the blow, we even out the rough patches, but Kick-ass 2 (much like other unfortunate stagnant motion comics like Daredevil and Watchmen) struggles to literalize the comic's page and loses cinematic energy in the process.

One problem is a matter of tone, because like many have already discussed this movie can't decide whether or not it's a spoof or a grim & gritty version of the classic street level superhero archetype. The weird thing is that the street level vigilante doesn't really exist on film. What I mean is the hero that handles muggers and bank robbers in back alleys and on rooftops. Spider-Man and Daredevil are the closest, but both have super powers. Batman is the obvious answer, but aside from the opening of Batman (1989) those movies have stuck almost exclusively with wacky, gimmicky super villains and their thugs, possibly due to the questionable iconography of a white super hero beating up on the visibly impoverished, especially minorities. No, Kick-Ass with his twin batons and his compatriots more resemble the likes of Nightwing or earlier Golden Age heroes that ran around in simplistic tights beating up hooligans with fisticuffs. That's something that, oddly enough, has only existed in the spoof form (Mystery Men) or the deconstruction (Watchmen) on film, but spoofs and deconstructions of concepts that don't really exist on film.

Concepts like patrolling, sidekicks, the "team-up" (when two unrelated heroes meet under strange circumstances and work together, a la The Brave & The Bold and Marvel Team-Up), and the superhero team are rare or non-existent in film. The X-Men and the Fantastic Four don't count because they don't fight crime in the traditional sense, certainly not on the street level, and form teams out of common themes and goals (prejudice, family). The Avengers, of course, is maybe the closest to Watchmen's Minutemen and Kick-Ass 2's Justice Forever, but there it's disparate "cosmic" heroes fighting an alien invasion, not masked men catching purse snatchers. So why does Hollywood keep getting ahead of itself in this department? Wanted at least had the good sense to not adapt a narrative that plays heavily on dirtying Silver Age archetypes, and Watchmen dropped most of the EC Comics' homaging by losing the pirate story (at least in the theatrical cut) and the Squid, but Kick-Ass 2 feels like it's attempting to manipulate and subvert big ideas from comics for an audience that isn't familiar with the material.

Still, for what could've been a joke of a character, Jim Carrey imbues Colonel Stars & Stripes with believable motivation and a sense of dignity. I actually cared and empathized with his mission when he died, as opposed to the majority of the rest of the cast (Kick-Ass included) who are obviously damaged people dressing up to get their kicks. That's something that gets lost with fans of Watchmen: they're not superheroes, their crazy fetishists. There's a reason Moore and Gibbons never actually show them stop crime in a traditional sense, instead opting to focus on the quiet moments inbetween the fights that bring into stark focus the ridiculousness of these characters standing around in their long johns. Snyder completely misunderstood that by adding all the action and fights; Nite Owl is a cos-player at best. Kick-Ass 2 adds a nice ripple by playing up their community service and raising of morale for the city, but then can't decide if their violent attacks on criminals are selfish or actually making a difference. This is at its worst in the case of Hitgirl, who Moretz somehow conceptualizes as a three dimensional individual. The moment when her heart races upon seeing a boy band for the first time somehow overcomes triteness and offers real insight.

I don't know. Mother Russia taking out a bunch of cop cars is pretty awesome, but I can't decide if the changes from the comic (The Motherfucker refusing to kill the dog and his performance problem during the attempted rape) are a clever negotiation of recent tensions in comics (and popular fiction in general) regarding a sense of escalation between villain and hero or a cop out. The villain has to commit worse atrocities so the hero is justified in his retaliation, alleviating any audience guilt upon living vicariously through these moments of righteous violence, something I discussed recently in my Hero as Bully thread. This movie ends, however, with Kick-Ass taking the moral high ground and attempting to save The Motherfucker, something I appreciated although it of course is resolved with a NEARdeath-by-cop scenario.

Sometimes it's hard to believe something like this even exists. I kind of sat there for 103 minutes marveling at the "meanwhile..." and word balloons popping up over the Chinese characters. Still, even that bit of fan service isn't enough to save this forgettable movie.

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#40

Wow, that was some hot fuckin' garbage. All the Millar nonsense they managed to stomp out of the first one is back here in spades, and the whole thing ends up being an unpleasant mess. The homophobia, the misogyny, the low-rent gross out humor, crap characters, a plot trying to make eight stupid points simultaneously yet failing to tell any sort of basic coherent story. Millar's always been the poor, poor man's Garth Ennis, and it's incredibly evident here. It's just all so amazingly pointless. It doesn't make you laugh, it doesn't make you think, it just sits there being odious. Throw in the boring and uninspired direction and it just adds up to a whole lot of nothin'. I don't know if it's the loss of Vaughn at the rudder or what but while the first Kick-Ass was an alchemical miracle this one was exactly the kind of dreck I expected out of a Mark Millar adaptation.



I will say I wish they could have airlifted The Colonel and Mother Russia into the first film, because those two at least were consistently entertaining.

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#41

Mark Millar is awesome.

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#42

All is well.

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#43
AI think the real missing element is Jane Morgan on screenplay.
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#44
Quote:

Originally Posted by Hammerhead View Post

I think the real missing element is Jane Morgan on screenplay.


That could very well be it. I didn't realize Wadlow both wrote and directed this, and while I suspect there was actually a lot less writing this time around, we're also talking about the guy behind Cry Wolf and the locked-in a car thrill a minute Prey. Makes me wish they would have just let it be if they couldn't get someone competent behind the scenes.

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#45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splatoon View Post
 


That could very well be it. I didn't realize Wadlow both wrote and directed this, and while I suspect there was actually a lot less writing this time around, we're also talking about the guy behind Cry Wolf and the locked-in a car thrill a minute Prey. Makes me wish they would have just let it be if they couldn't get someone competent behind the scenes.



And the guy who's going to write and direct the X-Force movie.

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#46

Between Fox and the crap source material far outweighing the quality that franchise already had the deck stacked against it, but yeah seeing his name it was basically "whelp, at least I'll save on a ticket."

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#47

The biggest complaint I have is that the final battle didn't take place in Times Square like in the comic. Having a battle between heros an villans in colorful Times Square would've been the ultimate

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#48
Quote:

Originally Posted by HaloWithStyle View Post
 

The biggest complaint I have is that the final battle didn't take place in Times Square like in the comic. Having a battle between heros an villans in colorful Times Square would've been the ultimate




I just assumed it would cost too much.

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#49

Liked it more than the first one. The first one has a dry Mark Strong performance in its favor, and not much else. Granted the Ass-Kicker subplot seems mishandled (surely he should die?), there's way too much should I/shouldn't I put on the suit again stuff, and the resolution of Kick-Ass's relationship with his father seems deeply wrong. But I enjoyed the energy of this, the general amoral mischief, and the sense that nothing was off-limits.



I'd concur that most of the appeal of the series is how shockingly off-the-rails it can get, but I thought this film balances it well, delivering the shocking deaths and verbal gasps (what was The Motherfucker saying about Scarlet J at the end there?) without careering off into full, unrated exploitation. If the attempted rape had continued as presented in the comic, it would have given weight to the MF's argument that wearing the mask can empower the individual to do whatever vile act they want. Having him unable to get it up undermined him nicely.



Similarly, his willingness to have Carrey beheaded - that's right, Jim Carrey gets his head chopped off (off-screen) in this - without wanting to harm the dog added depth to that character, IMO. Something that was missing in the original comics full-on misanthropy.



I liked the Mean Girls parody and it's none-more-graphic conclusion, and the implication that Carrey might also be an active criminal, engaged in this superhero act to wipe out the competition.



Also, Mother Russia taking out those cops with the lawn mower. And Hit Girl responding to teenage girl criticism with "How about I put my foot up your snatch?"



It is cheap, and confused in its intentions, but I liked this more than most any other sequel since Universal Soldier : Day Of Reckoning.

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#50
AThis was on HBO, and it was not as good as I hoped it would be.
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#51
AGot the Unrated blu/dvd combo at Best Buy for $7.50. Not as stylish direction as the first and the pacing is off (short running length, but felt longer). I felt Carrey was a nice addition and it was weird watching him, knowing he disowned it. I rather enjoyed some moments and lines (Mother Russia suburban massacre, "They're not sidekicks, they're prostitutes...", etc).

MFer falls into the shark tank and gets eaten in this version. Edit: He survived (post credits) . Lost some limbs (including his dick).

Overall, KA2 was not the abomination I was expecting. Maybe the unrated stuff helped push it.

Apparently, Wadlow got the gig after pitching a Bloodshot (Valiant) movie to Vaughn (which is still happening at Sony?).
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#52

While I enjoyed the first movie (particularly Vaughn's directing) and remember the first comic series being a guilty pleasure, I loathed the second comic series and felt it was a work that had said whatever it had to say in the first iteration, with no follow-up needed.



Maybe it's for that reason that I never ended up watching this until this week.



This has some of the most jarringly uneven tonal shifts in a movie I have ever seen.  A would-be rape sequence played for laughs?  Protagonist's father is horrifically killed due to an unthinking, unfeeling betrayal, and not only is the death seemingly forgotten within a few minutes, but the guy who betrays them is welcomed back and nobody even gives a shit as to what had happened?  The film is just all over the place.  It's mean-spirited in parts that maybe should have been approached comedically, and then it's comedic in parts that are tone-deaf to what the characters onscreen are actually experiencing.



*A lot of the action scenes are completely flat in terms of visualization ... Vaugn is sorely missing.



**Carrey's voicework, BTW, is flat-out amazing in this.  I dare you to shut your eyes and listen to a snippet of dialogue and hear any trace of Carrey.  It's a pity he isn't working in the voiceover field.  I don't begrudge him his politics.  But, if he felt so strongly about the finished project, donate your salary to charity?



***Kick-Ass not immediately dropping that dangling fuckwad is just infuriatingly stupid and unsatisfying writing.



****Moretz's story was 10x more compelling than that of Kick-Ass.  And she stole every scene she's in.

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#53
ACarrey was super great in this. Looked like Rat King on TMNT. Hit-Girl and Mother Russia's climactic battle was the highlight of the movie, action-wise. Although the part where Hit-Girl is on the van after the cemetery scene and murdering the fuck out of everyone was pretty good too.

Sadly...,as much as I WANTED to like this...,I just couldn't. It was a total loss for me aside from the pluses I mentioned above..
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#54
Quote:

Originally Posted by Fraid uh noman View Post

Carrey was super great in this. Looked like Rat King on TMNT. Hit-Girl and Mother Russia's climactic battle was the highlight of the movie, action-wise. Although the part where Hit-Girl is on the van after the cemetery scene and murdering the fuck out of everyone was pretty good too.

Sadly...,as much as I WANTED to like this...,I just couldn't. It was a total loss for me aside from the pluses I mentioned above..


If I cut this film down to 45-60 minutes by eliminating every Kick-Ass scene that isn't directly related to Hit Girl it would be a far superior product.



It's a problem when a film's "B" story is 10x more compelling than the lead's.

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#55
AIt feels like the good stuff in Kick Ass 2 could've been fairly simply integrated into the first film and then we wouldn't even have to consider this shitty sequel..
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#56
AThe problem with Kick Ass 2 is that it hews too closely to the source material, which is pretty mean spirited to begin with. Oh that would-be rape sequence in the film? She actually gets raped in the comic. Wanna know how the Motherfucker shows how evil he is the comic? He has his henchman murder a school bus of children.

Seriously.
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#57

KA2 was a complete chore to sit through.  There was nothing 'fun' about the movie at all, it was just a mean-spirited burden of a film.  I fricking hated it whereas I absolutely loved the first one.

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#58
AYeah ok I'm glad they didn't make that movie. That's sick. Just gonna watch the first one and pretend anything after that didn't happen..
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#59

The only thing I remember about this movie is Hit-Girl discovering boy bands for the first time and reacting with, "Holy fuck."



That's pretty funny.



I don't need to watch the rest of the movie ever again.

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