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Film Critic Catch-All
It has BORAT on there but not FURY ROAD. Odd.

Just added EDEN to my Amazon queue. Thanks!
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(09-13-2019, 09:51 AM)Mangy Wrote: Just added EDEN to my Amazon queue. Thanks!

As Marty might say: 



home taping is killing music
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(09-13-2019, 09:51 AM)Mangy Wrote: It has BORAT on there but not FURY ROAD. Odd.

That's not odd. That's a fucking war crime.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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(09-13-2019, 09:46 AM)Mangy Wrote: Guardian followed up with their best films of the 21st century. Boone, you're not going to like the representation here either - https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/se...SApp_Other

Even for an online list intentionally designed to inspire clicks and arguments, it's kinda lame.

Why...why is Ted on there.  I mean...I like Ted.  

But the fuck?
"Why did she do it?"
"Why are you the fucking Police?"

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Spoilers for MIDSOMMAR, but I thought this was a really neat piece that not only gets into the films themes, but also "talks about the filmmaking," specifically its use of the color yellow:

https://www.room207press.com/2019/09/wdg...um=twitter
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I think we should ban all "best X of time period" lists until after the end of time period.
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(09-13-2019, 10:31 AM)boone daniels Wrote: Spoilers for MIDSOMMAR, but I thought this was a really neat piece that not only gets into the films themes, but also "talks about the filmmaking," specifically its use of the color yellow:

https://www.room207press.com/2019/09/wdg...um=twitter

unrelated, but I feel like the more cynical I get, the more I gravitate towards horror.

Because I feel like good horror exploits truths about our S O C I E T Y that people are uncomfortable talking about.
"Why did she do it?"
"Why are you the fucking Police?"

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(09-13-2019, 11:56 AM)ska oreo Wrote: unrelated, but I feel like the more cynical I get, the more I gravitate towards horror.

Because I feel like good horror exploits truths about our S O C I E T Y that people are uncomfortable talking about.

I feel the same way, and I've felt it for a really long time (maybe because I'm hyper-cynical), but something like TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE or THE THING or GET OUT tells me way more about the world than most Oscar bait-y dramas.
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Yeah, as I've gotten older, I've gravitated towards horror more than I did in my first couple decades of watching movies. Part of that may be because I've really become invested and interested in folk horror as a genre, but I also think it's because not only is it reflective of "the world" or "S O C I E T Y" (we live in one), but also because you can have a much more intense and primal emotional connection to it than perhaps other genres.
home taping is killing music
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The past 10 or so years especially, I've watched *a lot* more horror, and not just because of the Horror Movie Challenge (this discussion reminds me I still need to watch SOCIETY) . . . as you said, the genre most prone to being visceral would certainly have the most impact. It also helps that since it's the cheapest and easiest of genres to shoot, the sheer quantity means it will have the potential for the most varied ideas, statements, themes, however you want to put it.
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I just switched a friend onto Candyman and yeah, the socio-political themes stood out in their reaction.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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shit. Me and my friend watched They Live for the first time a couple of months ago and we were basically gobsmacked on how that movie gets so much wrong with modern day society terrifyingly right.
"Why did she do it?"
"Why are you the fucking Police?"

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(09-13-2019, 03:20 PM)ska oreo Wrote: shit.  Me and my friend watched They Live for the first time a couple of months ago and we were basically gobsmacked on how that movie gets so much wrong with modern day society terrifyingly right.

I just rewatched it myself a few months ago for the first time in a looooooong time.  

It's always interesting to look back on people bemoaning/warning us about horrible socio-political/socio-economic changes that were occurring and then realizing that the Boomers utterly and completely ignored any such disturbing trends.  They Live, Wall Street, and Network are the first three examples that come to mind.

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The great horror filmmakers always kept it 100. Polanski knew the banality of evil better than anyone. Romero understood that tribalism, materialism, and an inability to communicate would be humanity's downfall. Carpenter taught us that evil is inexplicable, it is unstoppable, and it never dies (also that people who look just like you and me may secretly be monsters inside). And so on
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(09-10-2019, 05:23 PM)Belloq87 Wrote: One of my favorite Ebert reviews remains the one he wrote for THE VILLAGE.  Not because it's particularly funny in the way it scorches the movie, but because it's very rare that a reviewer is able to directly express my own intense frustration with a film in such a pure way.

https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/the-village-2004

"To call it an anticlimax would be an insult not only to climaxes but to prefixes" is one of Ebert's best zingers.

Ebert was the guy who made me realize that movie reviews ought to be entertaining and showcase the writer's personality with transparency.  The older I got, the more I found that the most boring and insufferable reviewers tend to be the ones who think objectivity is the mission, whose writing feels as though they're trying to produce an opinion that will predict the consensus view.  Or, when they are being contrary to popular opinion, it's recognizable that they are mounting a conscious, calculated "take" with the notion that they have a read of the movie that will be validated in the long run even if it flies in the face of contemporary majority.  In other words, they're trying to be "right" about the movie.

Which is probably why Pauline Kael hasn't really been surpassed, in my mind.  She was personal, colorful, immediate and funny.  She didn't impose that layer of abstraction that makes most critics so dull.  I think she got a number of movies completely wrong (she pretty much had nothing nice to say about Kubrick after LOLITA), but she always shot from the hip in a bright, unfiltered way that makes her body of work forever fun to read.  I'm not suggesting she was always innocent of grinding an axe, driving an agenda or projecting something onto the screen that wasn't there, but she satisfied my rule that a critic should always be illuminating -- and if it can't be about the movie, then let it be about themselves.  

In the end, what I want out of film criticism is intelligent people writing passionately about movies.  It's a simple objective that seems bizarrely elusive to so many professional critics, which is why I refer to them with greater infrequency. I get much more insight from reading opinions in an environment like this.  Ebert was the last "card-carrying" guy I could stand to read loyally.
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Just dropping in to give this a shout out:

"It's coming... soon."


https://twitter.com/mangiotto/status/117...9437301762



[Image: EEjzMTFU0AA0n6k.jpg:large]

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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Thanks for the tip, Elvis! I really love the Walter Hill stuff I've seen - and I'm on record that Streets of Fire is maybe my favorite movie of all time.
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a tale of two walters
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(10 hours ago)boone daniels Wrote: Thanks for the tip, Elvis! I really love the Walter Hill stuff I've seen - and I'm on record that Streets of Fire is maybe my favorite movie of all time.


Wait, what?  Streets of Fire?  That is mildly surprising!  


Show us this "record".
If you're happy, you're not paying attention.

Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny: 
Glad that you guys worked that out amongst yourselves.

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STREETS OF FIRE. Never seen it. Given the love it gets in these parts, I'm kind of afraid to even try it at this point.

I do really love that Fixx song, though.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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A Walter Who Wrote Up Walter Hill, And Came Down On 'He's A Mountain!'
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(7 hours ago)Neil Spurn Wrote:
(10 hours ago)boone daniels Wrote: Thanks for the tip, Elvis! I really love the Walter Hill stuff I've seen - and I'm on record that Streets of Fire is maybe my favorite movie of all time.

Wait, what?  Streets of Fire?  That is mildly surprising!  

Show us this "record".

It might be more of a Facebook thing, now that I think about it. But yeah, it's definitely in my top ten, if not number one. It and THE SOCIAL NETWORK are probably the movies I've watched the most this century. I'm also a Jim Steinman nut.

But yeah, my wife and I had our bridal party announcement set to "Tonight is What It Means to Be Young."
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(6 hours ago)boone daniels Wrote:
(7 hours ago)Neil Spurn Wrote:
(10 hours ago)boone daniels Wrote: Thanks for the tip, Elvis! I really love the Walter Hill stuff I've seen - and I'm on record that Streets of Fire is maybe my favorite movie of all time.

Wait, what?  Streets of Fire?  That is mildly surprising!  

Show us this "record".

It might be more of a Facebook thing, now that I think about it. But yeah, it's definitely in my top ten, if not number one. It and THE SOCIAL NETWORK are probably the movies I've watched the most this century. I'm also a Jim Steinman nut.

But yeah, my wife and I had our bridal party announcement set to "Tonight is What It Means to Be Young."

I have a very distinct memory of seeing STREETS OF FIRE when I was about six years old, so roughly 27 years ago, and thinking it was the greatest fucking movie I’d ever seen.

And then I proceeded to never see it again until two months back when I finally caved and picked up the Blu-ray.

I didn’t have quite the same reaction, but....it’s a ton of fun, with some beautiful cinematography and production design.

And that soundtrack.

 “Nowhere Fast” has been stuck in my head on a loop for the last two months. The first five minutes of the flick set to that song is just impeccably edited, and for the life of me I can’t understand how that movie managed to tank as hard as it did back in June of 84.
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(09-14-2019, 02:44 PM)fatherdude Wrote: Which is probably why Pauline Kael hasn't really been surpassed ...  I think she got a number of movies completely wrong (she pretty much had nothing nice to say about Kubrick after LOLITA) ...

That opinion of Kubrick is a decided mark in her favor, in my opinion!

**I would also note that "dullness" is a stylistic, versus substantive, criticism of a reviewer.  I would hope that a certain measure of objectivity, unless the reviewer specifically indicates the subjective context, is the goal of any reviewer.

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