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The 100 Best Movies Ever - A Daily List from Nick
#71
AI've only seen it once so not sure on the rewatchability factor but I'm keen to see it again. So that has to count for something.
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#72
Quote:

Originally Posted by Bucho View Post

I've only seen it once so not sure on the rewatchability factor but I'm keen to see it again. So that has to count for something.

Now that I've bought the Blu-Ray, I'm already looking forward to loaning it out to unsuspecting friends and scarring them for life.

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#73

A while back, I tried to put together a list of all-time favorites, avoiding the most obvious ones from my youth (Star Wars, Ghostbusters, Raiders), with a vague idea to do...something with them.  I failed, ultimately, but among the 30 or so titles I came up were Oldboy, Basterds, and Out Of Sight, as well as different picks from Anderson and Gilliam.  At the rate this is going, I wouldn't be surprised if almost my entire list ends up represented.



So I approve thus far.  Although I suspect Nick's favored Mann, when we reach that point, will differ from mine.

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#74
Quote:

Originally Posted by Schwartz View Post


So I approve thus far.  Although I suspect Nick's favored Mann, when we reach that point, will differ from mine.



Maybe not sir, I'm going with 'best' not 'favorite' on some of these.

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#75
Quote:

Originally Posted by Bucho View Post

I've only seen it once so not sure on the rewatchability factor but I'm keen to see it again. So that has to count for something.


No rewatchability, unless you're actually using it as a study piece. Or as Nick said, showing it to others so you can delight at their faces getting blown out of their heads.

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#76

Master List: http://www.chud.com/154399/the-100-best-movies-ever-index/

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#77
Quote:

Originally Posted by Nick Nunziata View Post
 


Maybe not sir, I'm going with 'best' not 'favorite' on some of these.



Either way, my beloved is not one that is generally considered essential Mann.  We shall see how it all shakes out.



I'm quite sure that we'd both choose the same "minor" Scorsese to champion, however.

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#78

AFTER HOURS?

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#79

http://www.chud.com/154470/the-100-best-...er-jfk-91/

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#80
A[quote name="MrTyres" url="/community/t/151457/the-100-best-movies-ever-a-daily-list-from-nick/50#post_3768924"]So, not to be the guy who tries to forecast the list ... [/quote]

Hint: Listen to the CHUD podcast for clues.
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#81
AAnother great choice. 3 hours long and it flies by. How does this look on Blu?
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#82

I remember reading a Film Comment essay around the time of Natural Born Killers, discussing Oliver Stone's "cinematic language" trajectory - from the formalist/classical Salvador/Platoon/Wall Street to the fragmentary/modernist/hallucinatory Doors/JFK/NBK. It was as if his journey as a filmmaker was to put all his classical Hollywood skills (which he began honing as a Hollywood screenwriter even before becoming a director) through a blender.



Looking at it that way, "Talk Radio" feels like the medium between the two phases.

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#83

Stone's fall has been really depressing. When I was first getting into filmmaking he was at the top of his game and one of my favorite directors (JFK is a masterpiece). But I don't think he's made one really good movie since the turn of the century. Mediocrity at best.

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#84

Remember watching JFK in first-run nearly 25 years ago (man alive).  What a trip.



In terms of his recent output, I enjoy Savages.  Stone couldn't pull the trigger on Winslow's original ending, but even so I dig it.  Wall Street 2, W., Alexander, WTC, though...

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#85

http://www.chud.com/154499/the-100-best-...erance-90/

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#86
AMy personal favorite Burt Reynolds performance. Maybe Voight too..
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#87

I approve of this selection.

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#88

Boorman really doesn't get his due amongst the big names of the 70s and 80s, despite having a couple bonafide masterpieces on his (otherwise fascinatingly uneven) resume.



Realization: Nicholas Winding Refn is becoming the 21st century's Boorman.

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#89

Nick, sorry to be this guy, but your "BUY IT FROM US" link for Deliverance leads to Oldboy search results on Amazon.

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#90

I always forget!

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#91

Fixed! So glad people are clicking those links!

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#92
Quote:

Originally Posted by Schwartz View Post
 


Realization: Nicholas Winding Refn is becoming the 21st century's Boorman.


I've never seen that comparison before, but it works. Kind of makes me wish Refn was directing that new King Arthur movie instead of Guy Ritchie.

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#93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schwartz View Post
 

Realization: Nicholas Winding Refn is becoming the 21st century's Boorman.




Quote:

Originally Posted by Schwartz View Post
 

Boorman really doesn't get his due amongst the big names of the 70s and 80s, despite having a couple bonafide masterpieces on his (otherwise fascinatingly uneven) resume.



Realization: Nicholas Winding Refn is becoming the 21st century's Boorman.



Huh.



I tried to think of a movies from the 70s that most reminded me of N.W. Refn.  After pondering for a bit, I decided Point Blank was my clear choice.  I did not recall who directed it, so I went and looked it up.



It was Boorman.  Honest to Cthulhu, completely surprised me.



That'll do Schwartz.  That'll do.

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#94

They also both have one incongruous, gritty medieval flick on their resume in Excalibur/Valhalla Rising.

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#95
Quote:

Originally Posted by Schwartz View Post
 

They also both have one incongruous, gritty medieval flick on their resume in Excalibur/Valhalla Rising.


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#96

http://www.chud.com/154519/the-100-best-...e-west-89/

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#97

The list so far is A+



Quote:

Originally Posted by Schwartz View Post
 

Boorman really doesn't get his due amongst the big names of the 70s and 80s, despite having a couple bonafide masterpieces on his (otherwise fascinatingly uneven) resume.



Realization: Nicholas Winding Refn is becoming the 21st century's Boorman.



You had me until the realization coda.  Refn is visually brilliant like Boorman, but that's as far as the parallel goes imho.

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#98
AAnother great choice and movie I need to own on blu.

I defy anyone to stop watching this movie after that first scene.
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#99
AFantastic choice. This is the only Western I still spin up on a regular basis. The first scene hooks me right in.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Bluelouboyle View Post

I defy anyone to stop watching this movie after that first scene.


Oh, I know a couple of people who could easily do it. Sadly.



Such a perfect movie. For all of John Ford's genius Leone's position outside of the US and its mythology and looking in just gives this the extra push to put it at the top of all Westerns for me.

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I'd still put the Searchers ahead of this as Leone is seriously homaging Ford's work throughout this flick (Something he was definitely consciously doing even while writing the script....with Bernardo Bertolucci!) Take that, Tarantino!



And speaking of Tarantino, I remember before Pulp Fiction's release, a magazine was hyping the creative jump from "Reservoir Dogs" to Pulp Fiction" as similar to "Good, the Bad, and the Ugly" to "Once Upon A Time In The West". Got me excited.




Quote:


Originally Posted by Andy Bain View Post

Fantastic choice. This is the only Western I still spin up on a regular basis. The first scene hooks me right in.

Vince Gilligan has used the opening scene as the visual reference for "Breaking Bad" so many times.




The "love scene" between Frank and Jill is still one of the sexiest (and twisted) ever.





I love the way Leone corrupts the iconic Goodie Fonda image, starting with the emphasis on the menacing evilness of his blue eyes.



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AThe harmonica refrain is one of the most haunting ever IMO.

Any time I lissten to The Orb's Little Fluffy Clouds it makes me want to watch this movie.

I remember seeing this on TV when I was much younger and my only other experience of Henry Fonda was from On Golden Pond. It was quite the difference.

In fact I was so young I was ignorant of the title. Years later at Uni we were talking Westerns, and favourites and saying "whats that one with the harmonica and the hanging" and my much more Cinephile mate suddenly exploding into enthusiasm and schooled me all about it.

A few years later they released it on widescreen VHS. That was a happy, happy day for us.
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"People scare better when they're dyin'."



Chills, every single time.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by machiav View Post
 

Something he was definitely consciously doing even while writing the script....with Bernardo Bertolucci!



And Dario Argento!

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A[quote name="stelios" url="/community/t/151457/the-100-best-movies-ever-a-daily-list-from-nick/90#post_3770553"]
Oh, I know a couple of people who could easily do it. 
[/quote]

Good point. In fact quite a few of my friends would probably say "Does anything actually happen in this movie?"

When we watched LAWRENCE OF ARABIA a few numskulls said "It was boring, just desert"
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