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INTERSTELLAR (An Observation By Christopher Nolan) Post-release Discussion
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Originally Posted by David81 View Post

Havent seen this yet but judging by the negative reactions here i guess Snowpiercer will remain the best scifi this year. Still looking forward to seeing this.


SNOWPIERCER is far less ambitious, and thus succeeds to a far greater degree. I actually think the quality of nolan's output is inversely proportional to his ambition.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Ska Oreo View Post

So is it bad, or just frustratingly good?

how did you feel after watching PROMETHEUS? I'm guessing most people will have a similar reaction.


--



back to the swirling cesspool of themes, though...



first cooper wants to do the mission to save the earth/his family (but on the down low, he really just wants to colonize space), but then he realizes he'll end up missing a good portion of his kids' lives trying to complete the mission.



OK, up to that point I'm good. strong themes, sacrifice, needs of one vs. needs of many, etc. etc.



but then we throw in Michael Caine's "lie", and the reveal that they were never meant to come home. And then it becomes about who knew what, and who withheld what information from who, and in the midst of all this cooper decides to go home and basically die on earth with his grown kids.



And that's where I start to lose track a bit. Why (more in a thematic sense than a plot sense) does Michael Caine continue the charade on earth for decades when he's already concluded that everyone on earth will die? is it to keep hope alive for the people ("protect your kids", as cooper mentions)? I just can't think of any logic behind it, or any grander meaning for the film.



And if cooper has to reach the 5th dimension in order to communicate with murph, why does he try to send himself the message to stay? by that point, he's already 3/4s of the way to completing the original mission. if anything, he should be encouraging his past self to go.

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AI don't know how SNOWPIERCER is less ambitious. By what metric?

Its relatively minuscule budget compared to Interstellar?
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hard to elaborate without derailing this thread too much, but in the simplest terms:



SNOWPIERCER doesn't


- tackle multiple time periods/spaces/dimensions


- make a play at grandiose themes (class warfare? hum...)


- track multiple parallel plot lines/characters



all that said, I found way more to like in that film than I did INTERSTELLAR. ambition =/= better, necessarily

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I disagree with the standards for ambition you set!

I WON'T ALLOW IT!!!

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AInterstellar is DIVINE!!! (Still haven't seen it)
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What a magnificent disaster this movie was.

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Most WTF moments in Interstellar:



1) David Gyasi was waiting 24 years for the other astronauts to come back and they were like "wow, whatever dude..."


2) 24 years have passed and Michael Caine looks exactly the same, but with a wheelchair.


3) Special Guest Star acting like a supervillain for no reason.


4) Casey Affleck punching Topher Grace for taking care of his kids ¿?

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Quote:

Originally Posted by santi-freak View Post
 


4) Casey Affleck punching Topher Grace for taking care of his kids ¿?


HE WAS GONNA VACCINATE THEM!!!

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I love the scene where...


...Ellen Murphstyn is lying in her hospital bed and sees Coop for the first time in forever, and she's like, "Hi... I know you crossed time and space to see me again. Thanks much. okay, you can leave now, so I can be with my family."
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ASeeing it in 5 min. You're all wrong, by the way. NOLAN IS DIVINE
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Another great scene...SPOILERS



When Chastain Murph figures out the equation (by looking for hours and hours at her bookstore apparently) and goes and hugs his brother... Casey Affleck WTF expression in his face is priceless.

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AJust got back from this. Amazing and uneven. It didn't insult my intelligence which was a nice change of pace from a Hollywood movie. One of the funnier details was the all corn dinner the family sits down to.

Fuckin' HuffingtonPost spoiled the 2nd act casting surprise on its front page. Thanks to everyone in this thread for showing more restraint.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Jmurdoch View Post
 One of the funnier details was the all corn dinner the family sits down to.

Heh, I noticed that too!




Also, pretty cool:



http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/act-f...the-movie/

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SurpriseCentury View Post
 

hard to elaborate without derailing this thread too much, but in the simplest terms:



SNOWPIERCER doesn't


- tackle multiple time periods/spaces/dimensions


- make a play at grandiose themes (class warfare? hum...)


- track multiple parallel plot lines/characters



all that said, I found way more to like in that film than I did INTERSTELLAR. ambition =/= better, necessarily


Interstellar doesn't end with a cheesy CGI polar bear.



Quote:


Originally Posted by Bradito View Post
 

I love the scene where...


...Ellen Murphstyn is lying in her hospital bed and sees Coop for the first time in forever, and she's like, "Hi... I know you crossed time and space to see me again. Thanks much. okay, you can leave now, so I can be with my family."

I  know you're just being funny but...


She was dying right then and she was wise enough to know that it wasn't right for him to see her die. She had long ago let go of him.


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Originally Posted by SurpriseCentury View Post
 

but then we throw in Michael Caine's "lie", and the reveal that they were never meant to come home. And then it becomes about who knew what, and who withheld what information from who, and in the midst of all this cooper decides to go home and basically die on earth with his grown kids.



And that's where I start to lose track a bit. Why (more in a thematic sense than a plot sense) does Michael Caine continue the charade on earth for decades when he's already concluded that everyone on earth will die? is it to keep hope alive for the people ("protect your kids", as cooper mentions)? I just can't think of any logic behind it, or any grander meaning for the film.




Perhaps Dr. Brand was trying to figure out another way, but when he had originally sent everyone up there it was to colonize with the embryos (or whatever). Plan B was always apart of the plan, but he would have never gotten anyone up there if Plan A wasn't an option.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Carnotaur3 View Post
 

I  know you're just being funny but...


She was dying right then and she was wise enough to know that it wasn't right for him to see her die. She had long ago let go of him.


Perhaps Dr. Brand was trying to figure out another way, but when he had originally sent everyone up there it was to colonize with the embryos (or whatever). Plan B was always apart of the plan, but he would have never gotten anyone up there if Plan A wasn't an option.


But Mann says Brand briefed him before he left that Plan A was impossible. Plan B WAS Plan A. He never would've gotten anyone up there if they didn't believe that Plan A was an option, but he always knew it wasn't.
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Still processing, but I THINK I kinda liked it.  There's enough good in there to outweigh the bad; at least, there was for me.



Good:


- The world building on future Earth and how it deals with the blight


- The special effects


- The overall intelligence of the main throughline of the plot, and the cleverness of how it all wrapped around.  I could tell it was coming, but I liked how it was all handled.



Bad:


- The sound mix was terrible, especially for McConoughey.  He spoke too softly for most of the film, so he needed to be higher up in the mix.


- Pacing issues.  The movie could have shed 30 minutes without any issue.


- Simple mistakes, like the fact that Michael Caine looked to be the same age throughout his entire role.  Also, Damon's sudden turn into a villain didn't make sense, but it was well executed from an acting standpoint.



The whole 'all you need is love' stuff didn't work great, but it didn't take me out of the movie enough to turn against it.



This feels like a one-and-done for me, though.  I don't think I need to ever see it again.

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ALong story short: Y'all niggas need the power of love in your hearts. That and Jesus.
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ASo Michael Caine's character

SPOILER

is basically copying his embryo-plan from General Zod? Does anyone "need to make a leap of faith" also? Seems like Nolan needs to take a long break before his next film.
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"WEYAZZZ DAC 'OH-DEX?"

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I cannot get over how much I HATED that "love" speech. For fuck's sake, it was so ham fisted it seemed like something Cameron wrote.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by santi-freak View Post
 

Most WTF moments in Interstellar:



3) Special Guest Star acting like a supervillain for no reason.



See, this didn't wasn't a problem for me for two reasons:



1) There's a discussion earlier on about evil being absent in nature, and only being something we bring with us.


2) "Heart of Darkness" is referenced before he is introduced.



That actor's character is basically Kurtz; he's gone so far up the metaphorical river that his darkest impulses and human frailties have overwhelmed him and driven him insane. I think more time could have been spent developing his psychology, but I guess the film was already so long...



My real question about said character: what made his makeshift house explode?!

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ANow that I've thought about it, I really, really liked this movie. Is it silly? Yep. Bloated? Uneven? Kind of. But man, when it works, it really fucking works.
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Now, do you want to go see it again?  Itching for a rewatch?



(not that this means anything about the film's actual quality or the legitimacy of your reaction.  I'm just curious)

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
 

Now, do you want to go see it again?  Itching for a rewatch?



(not that this means anything about the film's actual quality or the legitimacy of your reaction.  I'm just curious)


Actually, yeah. I imagine that I'll end up agreeing with you on most of this movie's faults, but none of it takes away from the enjoyment I had with it. And when it reached its "2001" phase, I had a big goofy grin on my face. I just loved how it unabashedly embraced its weirdness.



So yeah, I'd see it again. I really didn't feel the three hour run time.

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I enjoyed the movie.  Felt it moved along fine.  2 hours and 50 minutes moved along pretty well.



But still... don't really feel the pull to go back.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
 

I enjoyed the movie.  Felt it moved along fine.  2 hours and 50 minutes moved along pretty well.



But still... don't really feel the pull to go back.


Fair enough. I get that the family drama didn't really work that well, particularly towards the end. It was weird seeing that climax in space being cross-cut with "I GOTTA DO THIS THING BEFORE CASEY AFFLECK YELLS AT ME!!!"

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Also Sam Neil did that explanation for Wormholes way better in EVENT HORIZON.



I thought this was above average. Overlong in parts but nothing that insulted my intelligence like in PROMETHEUS.

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ALiked it a lot. Cried a couple of times, in the father/daughter stuff.

Damon's motive was massively telegraphed from the "only evil is what we take with us" and "he was the best of us" so I was a bit impatient for the reveal.

Loved the robots.

Weird thing was I've only really recently watched The Dust Bowl, so seeing the interviews from that in this grounded it a lot more for me, in terms of the overall effect of a dying earth.

I liked that it got SO bonkers at the end.

Definately, for me, a movie that is greater than the sum of its parts.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stelios View Post
 

I cannot get over how much I HATED that "love" speech. For fuck's sake, it was so ham fisted it seemed like something Cameron wrote.



To me, it's not just the speech. It's that this is the first time we even hear about Hathaway's great love, and it's for a character we've never seen. Again, I'm a little baffled that Nolan can have such a gift for visuals and yet no feel for visual storytelling.

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AGiven his comments about not being able to make Close Encounters as a parent the way he did as a young single man, it would have been fascinating to see Spielberg's take on another dad leaving his family.

This isn't as deep or profound as it thinks it is, but it's never less than compelling. Didn't feel like almost three hours to me at all. If anything, the ambition of what's attempted here is inspiring (and maybe what the film itself is about -- if you're going to fail, fail big and noble).

Also, Murph cracking the equation doesn't mean instant interstellar travel. We didn't go to the moon the day after the Wright Brothers flew, after all. Cooper Station struck me as a departure point, a sort of port city, a place from which to send missions through the wormhole without the need to break free of Earth's gravity and trek out to Saturn every time. They clearly had the facilities for traveling into the wormhole.

And I swore that was William Fichtner as the voice of TARS.
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A[quote name="Hammerhead" url="/community/t/152210/interstellar-an-observation-by-christopher-nolan-post-release-discussion/120#post_3800422"]
To me, it's not just the speech. It's that this is the first time we even hear about Hathaway's great love, and it's for a character we've never seen. Again, I'm a little baffled that Nolan can have such a gift for visuals and yet no feel for visual storytelling.
[/quote]

But every time she mentions Edmund's planet, you can see the subtext all over her face. It's not some left-field reveal.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Richard Dickson View Post


Also, Murph cracking the equation doesn't mean instant interstellar travel. We didn't go to the moon the day after the Wright Brothers flew, after all. Cooper Station struck me as a departure point, a sort of port city, a place from which to send missions through the wormhole without the need to break free of Earth's gravity and trek out to Saturn every time. They clearly had the facilities for traveling into the wormhole.

Some amount of spoiler space still seems appropriate.



The doctor says Murph is transferring from another station and will be at Cooper in a couple of days, implying both that all of humanity is living in various space stations, and that they're either close enough to each other, or their ships are now fast enough due to the gravity drives that it only takes days to move between stations.



And Murph saying that Brand is still out there all alone and Cooper needs to go after her certainly seems to imply that they're not using the wormhole for anything. They've been living in space for 70 years, why hasn't anyone before Coop gone after Brand?

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They do also mention Murph has been asleep for two years, which is how long the orignal Saturn trip was going to take.  They're not zipping around the solar system yet.



I could derive a forumla for travelling at the speed of light, but the means of doing so would still have to be designed and built and tested.  It might even take 70 years.  Remember, getting to the other galaxy wasn't the problem, it was the effects of relativity.

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I really enjoyed this.  Its messy and overwrought at times, no doubt about it, but ultimately I don't think I care.



Case in point - Hathaway's love speech; Its cringe-worthy as she's delivering it, but I like it more thematically in retrospect, once we discover she's basically right and that Edmond's planet was the choice they should have made.  Love ends up being the answer to everything, this unquantifiable force that isn't bound to space or time.  Its super cheesy, and the script is never wants to dial it back, but Brand's love speech ends up foreshadowing Cooper's big third act stuff in a really effective way, where its his connection to Murph that transcends the dimensional barrier, saving humanity.



I keep coming back to the black hole / tesseract, and its 2001 lineage.  Even TARS, zipping around in there with Cooper, processing all the information that will end up being a vital turning point for humanity, and the next step in its evolution as a species, ends up feeling less like a callback to HAL and more like a callback to the obelisk.  TARS' design can't be coincidental.



Also, someone mentioned earlier in the thread that the film should have ended with Brand touching down on the Edmonds planet, only to discover that it had already been colonized; I like that a lot.



Tons of stuff to chew on here.  Kinda loved it.

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Why didn't they just dump Plan B on the 1 hour = 7 years tsunami planet, wait a week and then dump a couple of generations of Plan Beople on the other two planets?

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