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The Space / NASA thread
Back in the states till 55S lands in December... heck of a launch.
   
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Congrats!

It's funny to see people wandering around a rocket like it's a ride at the county fair.
Gamertag: Tweakee
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I am in awe. Really. I have followed the space program since I could actually remember it: I think it was during Project Gemini when Ed White did his space walk (I recall my dad saying this was an important moment in history). By the time Apollo was active I was fully tuned-in, and I've accumulated a complete shelf of books and magazines on the subject (especially the moon missions) since then. Thanks so much for these updates! Quick question: on an earlier post you were wearing a shirt with a ship with the number '51' on it. I know that Apollo 12 ('Yankee Clipper') launched in November 1969, which would make it 49 years. It also appears that on your shirt we are looking at the stern of a ship, instead of the bow (which is on the mission patch). Is there any significance?
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How was your day at work, guys?

http://time.com/5382816/international-sp...sure-leak/
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So... with everything else going on in the world, I don't know how many of you guys are tracking this... but it's a big fucking deal.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/09/...ss-theory/

Quote:Russian theory that NASA sabotaged the space station spreading like wildfire

I'm working the medical issue, which is real. But the idea that we'd want to return early is completely backwards. For the issue at hand, returning early is the worst thing we could do. This is complete high octane bullshit from Roscosmos, and lighting up the crew like this is out fucking rageous. Not to mention we've done a damn good job of keeping my piece of this quiet... so I'm pretty livid.
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https://www.space.com/41912-japanese-hop...eroid.html

Cool photos. No Bruce Willis in sight.
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Now that is fucking cool.
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What a week.

https://edition.cnn.com/2018/10/11/europ...1539386309

I'm the guy in the back right corner talking to our guys in the field. God bless the Soyuz - that vehicle saved our guys' lives.

https://mobile.twitter.com/nasa/status/1...2304175104
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Astronomers have found strong evidence of a frigid alien world about 3.2 times more massive than Earth circling Barnard's Star, a dim red dwarf that lies just 6 light-years from the sun.

https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/science/anc...d_nn_tw_ma

Quote:The nearest single star to the sun apparently hosts a big, icy planet.

Astronomers have found strong evidence of a frigid alien world about 3.2 times more massive than Earth circling Barnard's Star, a dim red dwarf that lies just 6 light-years from the sun. Barnard's Star is our sun's nearest neighbor, apart from the three-star Alpha Centauri system, which is about 4.3 light-years away.

The newly detected world, known as Barnard's Star b, remains a planet candidate for now. But the researchers who spotted it are confident the alien planet will eventually be confirmed.

"After a very careful analysis, we are 99 percent confident that the planet is there," Ignasi Ribas, of the Institute of Space Studies of Catalonia and the Institute of Space Sciences in Spain, said in a statement.

"However, we'll continue to observe this fast-moving star to exclude possible, but improbable, natural variations of the stellar brightness which could masquerade as a planet," added Ribas, the lead author of a new study announcing the detection of Barnard's Star b. That study was published online today (Nov. 14) in the journal Nature.
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Thumbs Up 
Olmos: Just to follow up, I am extremely glad that all the redundancy systems worked and the crew was able to eject and land safely following what appeared to be a failure of a second stage of the launch vehicle. I cannot imagine what you experienced during that typical 'day at work'. Nobody else has said it so I will just state that your efforts are very much appreciated!
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(11-15-2018, 08:37 PM)chief zabu Wrote: Olmos: Just to follow up, I am extremely glad that all the redundancy systems worked and the crew was able to eject and land safely following what appeared to be a failure of a second stage of the launch vehicle. I cannot imagine what you experienced during that typical 'day at work'. Nobody else has said it so I will just state that your efforts are very much appreciated!

Thanks chief. Looks like we’re going to get Nick and Aexei a new rocket - early word is they’ll be going back up on 58S in March.

The most Sisyphean thing I have ever done?

Debate Flat Earthers in the NASA Administrator’s Facebook feed.
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Oh no.  Rumor is one of my coworkers is a flat earther.  I don't know where to even start with such a person.
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"You are dumb."

Oh, wait, that's where you -finish- with such a person. But I guess you could just start there as well, and get the conversation over with more quickly.
Gamertag: Tweakee
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The NASA InSight Mars lander lands today!  3 p.m. EST / noon PST.  Lots of ways to watch the landing live, here's the feed provided by NASA:

https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive

Mission control / commentary begins about an hour before the landing they say.
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Chalk up another win for JPL. Those nerds really bring it on game day.
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China is going to the dark side of the moon:

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-46471668

Quote:China has launched the first mission to land a robotic craft on the far side of the Moon, Chinese media say.

The Chang'e-4 mission will see a static lander and rover touch down in Von Kármán crater, located on the side of the Moon which never faces Earth.

The payload blasted off atop a Long March 3B rocket from Xichang Satellite Launch Center.

The mission will pave the way for the country to deliver samples of Moon rock and soil to Earth.

The landing will not occur until early January, when the probe will descend on thrusters and touch down on the rugged terrain of the lunar far side. 

Von Kármán crater is of interest to scientists because it is located within the oldest and largest impact feature on the Moon - the South Pole-Aitken Basin. This was probably formed by a giant asteroid impact billions of years ago.

The landers will characterise the region's geology and the composition of rock and soil.
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