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Will we ever get Frank Darabont back?
#1

The last thing he put out was MOB CITY in 2013.  Since then he seems to have been focusing on his Walking Dead lawsuit and auctioning off the geek memorabilia he's collected over the years (possibly to pay for said lawsuit).  Oh, and there was that brief period where he was going to direct THE HUNTSMAN.



This fucking sucks.  The guy needs to be out there helming projects again, be they Stephen King adaptations (THE LONG WALK is supposed to still be on his bucket list), the FAHRENHEIT 451 adaptation or literally anything else that isn't the goon-for-hire gig THE HUNTSMAN surely was.



If this lawsuit really is the hang-up, here's hoping the judge rules in Darabont's favor in a hurry and AMC has to pay through the nose and this film maker might go back to, you know, making films again.  Because really.

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#2
AA lawsuit? I know nothing of this lawsuit, what happened?
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#3

This article contains info and links - http://deadline.com/2016/02/walking-dead-lawsuit-frank-darabont-amc-caa-claims-letters-1201698958/

It's been going on for nearly two and a half years now.

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#4
Aoh shit!

TIME RISK
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#5
AI heard from a gal I once knew who worked in TV production (who stopped dating me after she saw me do standup, FTW) that if you direct a TV pilot, you get to collect royalties off the show for its entire run because it's your guiding vision.

So AMC fucked Darabont out of a pile of money, unless he negotiated some other kind of deal.
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#6

Okay, that would make sense then.



It does kind of suck that Frank is dealing with it and not creating though. In the end, he gets more money and that's it. Maybe he just likes the vindication.

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#7
AHe tried getting TWD made for years and years and now it's the most popular show in the history of basic cable. I'd say he deserves to be vindicated.

Someone's making a pile of cash off that program.
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#8

I get it, but speaking personally, this wouldn't be something I'd waste my time on.

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#9
ANo, you totally would!
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#10

You're right...



Cause I'm really...





Thanks for reminding me about my lawsuit, ass!

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#11
ANo prob.
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#12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carnotaur3 View Post
 

I get it, but speaking personally, this wouldn't be something I'd waste my time on.



Unless he's relying on the money he's owed to finance more projects.  He sold his home and now a bunch of high-priced artwork, suggesting he's not in the best financial straits (not in a "real world" sense, I'm sure, but maybe in a "I can't get a project off the ground" sense).  A lot could be riding on this lawsuit's outcome for people who want to see Frank do something other than depart over "creative differences" from projects he shouldn't have been attached to in the first place.

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#13
Quote:

Originally Posted by FatherDude View Post
 


Unless he's relying on the money he's owed to finance more projects.  He sold his home and now a bunch of high-priced artwork, suggesting he's not in the best financial straits (not in a "real world" sense, I'm sure, but maybe in a "I can't get a project off the ground" sense).  A lot could be riding on this lawsuit's outcome for people who want to see Frank do something other than depart over "creative differences" from projects he shouldn't have been attached to in the first place.


But he did it all for the lawsuit apparently.



That's my points, is it really worth it? Guess we'll all find out.

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#14

He definitely seems to be pushing all of his chips in.  Fingers crossed that the aggrieved party wins this particular fight over Hollywood accounting, even if just for the novelty value.

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#15
ADarabont is a passionate guy who I imagine refused to put up with Hollywood bs like this. I don't think he's the kind of person who could simply move on from a slight with this much at stake.
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#16

He definitely has a reputation for holding his ground.  Before THE HUNTSMAN, he was attached to direct LAW-ABIDING CITIZEN, but left that one over creative differences too.  I can remember AICN reporting that it "ended ugly" without further elaboration.  And of course his repeated pushing back against TWD's budgets cuts are what made AMC get rid of him.  Dude fights for his projects, which is how I suppose you get a reputation for being "notoriously a pain in the ass", but I'm guessing it's not the people on the creative end who feel that way, since he also has a reputation for engendering incredible loyalty from his teams.

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#17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post

I heard from a gal I once knew who worked in TV production (who stopped dating me after she saw me do standup, FTW) that if you direct a TV pilot, you get to collect royalties off the show for its entire run because it's your guiding vision.

So AMC fucked Darabont out of a pile of money, unless he negotiated some other kind of deal.


Goddamit, does that mean I've been giving Brett Ratner money this whole time when I bought those Prison Break DVD sets?



Sigh...it's alright, Brett. I'll let you have this one. The Prison Break pilot and the Charlie Sheen magnum opus "Money Talks" are still your finest works.



On topic, I hope Frank wins this. AMC sound like a scummy network.

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#18

The way they treated Darabont plus general miserliness is why I never feel bad about hatewatching TWD.



More on topic, the Darabont I would really love to see make a comeback is B movie writer old school FD. Get him on that Blob remake.

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#19
AI've never understood the whole hate watching thing. I can't stand to watch stuff I hate.
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#20

Hatewatching: because sometimes, you just have to satisfy that curiosity.



My home viewing of Ant-Man would definitely qualify as a hatewatch. It left me feeling better afterward about not seeing it in the theater. It also got me up to speed on all the Ant-Man lore I needed to understand the subtleties of Civil War.



Transformers 4 and Amazing Spider-Man 1+2 fall into another subcategory of the hatewatch, the "I just have to know how bad it is" branch. Will I hate it for the same reasons as other people? Will I find new and interesting things to hate about it that others may have overlooked? Will there be odd bits of it that I actually like? Why did Spider-Man forget Electro's birthday? These are questions I need answered.

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#21

"Hatewatching" has become a hip way of saying "guilty pleasure."  Make no mistake - if you're continuing to watch The Walking Dead six seasons in, you inescapably like it, regardless of what you have to tell yourself.

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#22

I love watching things I hate!

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#23

Apparently Frank Darabont was interviewed in an upcoming episode of Robert Rodriguez's Director's Chair to be aired later this month.  Cannot wait until two years from now, aka the average turnaround time for El Rey Network shows to wind up on Amazon Video!

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#24

New interview with Frank over at Yahoo!.



Quote:
You’ve been busy this decade with TV’s The Walking Dead and then Mob City, and you consequently haven’t made a film since The Mist. Any urge to get back to movies?


I’m thinking about it. Coming to grips with the fact that the business has changed vastly and dramatically, and that nobody quite knows where it’s going, has been like trying to get your bearings on shifting ice. I was very proud of Mob City, and I really devoted a very intense year to it. And that came on the heels of several very intense years on The Walking Dead. At the end of Mob City, I came in for a bit of a rough landing. I had to go in for spine surgery because I had two discs rupture while we were posting Mob City. And I realized that, from that first gig of A Nightmare on Elm Street 3 to the end of Mob City, I hadn’t really stopped for 28 years. It was 28 years of just ruthless pressure, and three decades just blew by me in a blur. I felt like a guy on a bullet train.


And so I married this amazing woman, and I decided to take some real time off. We moved out of L.A., up to the central coast in Monterey, and I love it here and I’ve just been recovering from the last 28 years. It’s a sabbatical. Who knows, it could be retirement — ask Hollywood! [Laughs] Whether they invite me back in or not, who knows? But I’m now at the point where I’m thinking that I’ve still got a few good movies left in me, and maybe it’s time to get back into it and see what I can do.


I’ll tell you one thing — this is like crying over the fact that things aren’t what they used to be, but I sure am sad that there isn’t a Castle Rock anymore, because Castle Rock was the platinum standard of a studio, in terms of how to treat filmmakers, and how to gracefully go about your business. They made so many great movies, and had a great run of success, and I was so spoiled, without really knowing it, when I started directing. I didn’t realize how privileged a position I was in, and how well I was being treated. I knew I was being treated well, but looking back on it, they treated everyone like gold — so respectful and supportive and loving.


And that’s not how everybody does it, so… [Laughs] It’s not that easy to get anybody to say, “Yes,” for starters. Hollywood is an endless series of obstacles and roadblocks, basically. Whereas at Castle Rock, if you handed them a script and they really liked it, they said, “Oh, great, let’s make this!” It was that simple to get Shawshank green-lit. The Green Mile, same thing.


So I’m sorry that they’re not around anymore, and I wish there was a place out there that had that same vibe. But that’s what you get when you have a company that’s founded by filmmakers [Castle Rock Entertainment was co-founded by Rob Reiner] who are nothing but supportive and respectful.
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#25

Meanwhile, an update on The Walking Dead lawsuit from Hollywood Reporter:



Quote:

The Walking Dead co-creator Frank Darabont and his CAA agents have hit the homestretch in their lawsuit against AMC over the hit zombie show's profits. In a certificate of trial readiness filed on Monday, the plaintiffs reveal that they will be seeking a whopping damages verdict in excess of $280 million.


"Plaintiffs' damages claim has no basis in reality and we will continue to vigorously defend against this lawsuit," said AMC in a statement provided to The Hollywood Reporter.


Darabont was fired in the middle of the second season and his lawsuit contends that AMC has robbed him of contingent profits by producing the series and then licensing it to its cable network affiliate for not enough money. The lawsuit is a good example of a "vertical integration" case where AMC is arguing it negotiated the right to set an imputed license fee. Considering that Darabont was contractually entitled to as much as 10 percent of certain Walking Dead profits after deductions, the damages figure suggests the series has made billions. The lawsuit asserts, however, that a low license fee formula has been designed to ensure that the show would never be in the black for profit participants.


A trial will also feature the circumstances of Darabont's departure from Walking Dead, which will enter its seventh season in October. That's because Darabont is also alleging that AMC improperly reduced his profit share by not counting him as fully vested in the second season. He says he worked on all of the episodes of the second season while AMC asserts he had to be working full-time on the show at the end of the second cycle. A judge allowed the claim after an explosive deposition from Darabont was revealed detailing the "crisis-level problems" on the show.


Last week, discovery in the dispute formally ended.


On Tuesday, Justice Eileen Bransten held a status conference.


The next step in the dispute is summary judgment motions that will provide an even fuller picture of AMC's hit show and Darabont's negotiations.


If the judge allows the case to move forward, it will go to trial, though don't expect it anytime soon. At the hearing, Bransten said her 2017 schedule was completely booked and that the parties would need to wait until 2018 at the earliest. If and when that does occur, the trial will mark one of the biggest profit cases in television history with a potential outcome that surpasses the $319 million verdict that Disney suffered in the Who Wants to Be a Millionaire lawsuit.

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#26

AMC retaliates:



http://deadline.com/2016/11/the-walking-...201860780/

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#27
Quote:

A $280 million fight over profits from The Walking Dead is escalating into a full-on war between the show's network and CAA.



AMC informed the agency on Monday that it will no longer pay package fees — a common (and lucrative) industry practice in which an agency forfeits its standard 10 percent commission in exchange for an upfront payment and backend compensation.



The show's co-creator Frank Darabont sued in 2013, alleging AMC made a sweetheart deal licensing the show to itself in order to run a deficit so he and CAA "never see that first dollar" of profit participation.



CAA's attorney Chad Fitzgerald tells The Hollywood Reporter this latest move by the network is merely an attempt to litigate the dispute outside of court.



"AMC obviously remains unhappy that Frank Darabont and CAA have not given an inch, are still aggressively pursuing their meritorious claims against AMC regarding profits on The Walking Dead and other causes of action in the litigation, and have seen consistent success before the Court to date," he says. "Mr. Darabont and CAA look forward to vindicating their rights at trial. In the meanwhile, CAA will always do what is in the best interests of its clients."



http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq...ght-950896

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#28

Spicy:




http://variety.com/2017/tv/news/frank-da...202494598/



http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq...it-1020061

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#29

Wow, does Darabont come off as a raging, tyrannical prick here or what? I can see why they didn't want to give him a dime.

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#30

Poor Allan Garfield.

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#31
Quote:

Originally Posted by Carnotaur3 View Post
 

Wow, does Darabont come off as a raging, tyrannical prick here or what? I can see why they didn't want to give him a dime.



From what I've read about this story, the assholes in charge at AMC would have pushed me over the edge as well.

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#32

He seems pissed that some aren't working very hard to be their very best. The director of Shawshank Redemption can demand a little perfection.

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#33

No, nobody deserves to treat others like that, I don't give a shit who you are. In a world where creatives are put together and no person sees eye to eye or is on the same page, you cannot absolutely expect people to give you what you want, nor demand it to them by acting like a petulant child. Once you've become that, ain't nobody going to listen to what you want or what you have to say anyway.

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#34
Quote:

Originally Posted by Carnotaur3 View Post
 

Wow, does Darabont come off as a raging, tyrannical prick here or what?



I've heard way worse from showrunners.  You shoulda seen Glen Mazarra in the Damien production office.

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#35
Quote:

Originally Posted by Carnotaur3 View Post
 

No, nobody deserves to treat others like that, I don't give a shit who you are. In a world where creatives are put together and no person sees eye to eye or is on the same page, you cannot absolutely expect people to give you what you want, nor demand it to them by acting like a petulant child. Once you've become that, ain't nobody going to listen to what you want or what you have to say anyway.


I've heard WAY worse on productions I've been a part of, and nobody saw those!

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