Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Who Do You Rely On?
#36

 I was disappointed that MSNBC didn't drop out of Locked Up to cover Charlottesville. CNN's History of Comedy was scheduled to run in the one o'clock hour and they pull it to cover the story. I don't get the point of Locked Up either. I seriously doubt there are people who need convinced prison sucks.

I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is that I have lost my way. The good news is that I'm way ahead of schedule.
Reply
#37

Tim Pool


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=91KT9PCAZlQ

Reply
#38

I wasn't really sure where else to put this, so this thread was the winner.  The Charleston Gazette-Mail just filed for bankruptcy, continuing a sad trend of local papers disappearing.  An attorney by the name of Robert McLusky celebrated the loss at a coal conference recently by mocking a journalist who worked at the paper and extensively covered the coal industry with a pink slip.  McLusky works for Jackson Kelly, the law firm that the Gazette-Mail discovered was withholding evidence of black lung disease at the expense of sick miners in a Pulitzer Prize-winning series that can be found here:



https://www.publicintegrity.org/2013/10/...ick-miners



Coal reporter Taylor Kuykendall reported on McLusky's behavior at the conference:



https://twitter.com/taykuy/status/958799526852165633



So, what I'm getting at is that it's vital to support local newspapers.

Reply
#39

These guys...



http://www.chud.com/community/t/156033/t...alypse-now



...Yeah, I know I'm an idiot...

Reply
#40

Who do we rely on?  Regarding the ivory trade, we relied on Esmond Bradley Martin, and he was just stabbed to death:



http://time.com/5134006/esmond-bradley-m...ow_twitter

Reply
#41

Bumping this thread because apparently Medium thinks I like Caitlin Johnstone and I need a second, or third, opinion on her.

home taping is killing music
Reply
#42

AM Joy is the soundtrack of my Sunday morning commute.

I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is that I have lost my way. The good news is that I'm way ahead of schedule.
Reply
#43
Hopefully, no one is relying on Liberty University's newspaper:

https://world.wng.org/2018/08/papered_over

Quote:Kirk told the new staffers, “Your job is to keep the LU reputation and the image as it is. … Don’t destroy the image of LU. Pretty simple. OK? Well you might say, ‘Well, that’s not my job, my job is to do journalism. My job is to be First Amendment. My job is to go out and dig and investigate, and I should do anything I want to do because I’m a journalist.’ So let’s get that notion out of your head. OK?”

He added, “It’s their newspaper. They can stop this newspaper today if they wanted to. And just so you know, they can do it. Too much trouble, too many problems, we’re getting ourselves in hot water, you guys are doing stories we can’t defend. We’re gonna stop.”

The whole article is worth a read.
Reply
#44
Pittsburgh is now the largest U.S. city without a daily newspaper:

https://theincline.com/2018/08/26/the-pi...newspaper/

Quote:After many iterations, Pittsburgh’s last remaining daily, the 232-year-old Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, cut its print production schedule from seven days a week to five, eliminating physical copies of the Tuesday and Saturday editions, starting this weekend.

The news organization said it is looking to reposition itself as a more digitally focused outlet, amid widespread economic contractions facing newspapers.

PG Executive Editor David Shribman wrote that eliminating two print issues allows it to focus more on “undertaking a full-throttle commitment to the digital delivery of news…” In a subsequent letter to readers and subscribers, the PG said print editions would be eliminated on Tuesdays and Saturdays, but it will continue publishing e-editions on those days.

Shribman told The Incline that the production shift won’t coincide with newsroom layoffs now. He was unaware what it might mean on the production end, referring additional questions to the Post-Gazette’s chief marketing officer, Tracey DeAngelo, whose office declined comment when reached by The Incline.
Reply
#45
I get really, really tired of conservative media figures pretending the media don’t report on issues, and completely getting away with it.

https://mobile.twitter.com/greg_doucette...4399475713

   
Reply
#46
Definitely don't rely on this guy:

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/local/a...ium=social

Quote:On July 31, the Houston Chronicle published a front-page story with a provocative headline. "'We've moved on': Political anger after Harvey has eased," it declared, adding: "Experts believe disaster response is unlikely to be a factor in November."

It was a significant story by veteran reporter and Austin bureau chief Mike Ward. It asserted that Houston residents initially fed up with the uneven government response to Hurricane Harvey actually weren't going to blame politicians after all. The story began with West Houston resident Betsy Scheer, whose anger had faded. She was going to vote Republican.

"My friends are mostly the same way now," she was quoted as telling Ward.

But in the weeks after the story ran, questions were raised about the sourcing in Ward's story. No one could find Betsy Scheer. And no one could find three others quoted in the story — Tran Ng, Martina Racelli and Jack Nito.

The Chronicle spot-checked several other stories written by Ward. A pattern began to emerge: Alongside quotes from easy-to-find political figures, his stories were spiced with sparkling quotes from ordinary Texans, including a software engineer from Dallas, a businesswoman from Williamson County, a tea party activist.

Many of them could not be found, despite extensive searches in multiple databases by a newsroom researcher and more work by a private investigator.

The Chronicle spot-checked several other stories written by Ward. A pattern began to emerge: Alongside quotes from easy-to-find political figures, his stories were spiced with sparkling quotes from ordinary Texans, including a software engineer from Dallas, a businesswoman from Williamson County, a tea party activist.

Many of them could not be found, despite extensive searches in multiple databases by a newsroom researcher and more work by a private investigator.

The review included 744 stories, from early August 2018 back to January 2014, when he was hired after a long career at the Austin American-Statesman. A team of three pulled out the names of 275 individuals who were presented as ordinary Texans and made every effort to find them.

Of the 275 people quoted, 122, or 44 percent, could not be found. Those 122 people appeared in 72 stories.

It's impossible to prove that these people do not exist, only that with extensive research and digging, the team could not find them. And in this age of online records, including property ownership and court filings, almost everyone can be found quickly.
Reply
#47
Tribune Publishing is planning to offer buyouts to full-time, non-unionized workers who have been with the company for ten years:

https://pilotonline.com/business/jobs/ar...53b6a.html

Quote:Days after reporting a losing third quarter and as it entertains bids to buy its newspapers, Tribune Publishing is planning to offer buyouts to full-time non-unionized workers who have been with the company for at least 10 years.

The company, which owns The Virginian-Pilot and the Daily Press, is offering an “enhanced” package of incentives that includes longer severance pay and the opportunity to continue with medical, dental and vision benefits during the severance period.

The company won’t be offering buyouts to the New York Daily News newsroom, where half the staff was cut in July. It also won’t be offering buyouts to advertising and sales employees and manufacturing and production employees.

Tribune Publishing, which had been called Tronc until recently, owned the Daily Press for years before buying The Virginian-Pilot in May for $34 million. It has since combined some operations and begun extensive sharing of content. The Pilot had been family-owned for more than 150 years before the sale.

The letter from human resources sent to managers at The Virginian-Pilot indicated that unionized workers are expected to get an "equivalent offer" to take the buyout. That offer would come by Nov. 16. Tribune Publishing said it wants applications for buyouts returned by Nov. 26. Decisions will be made the next day on which buyouts will be accepted, and the employees' last day would be Nov. 30.

Newsprint tariff costs and the Annapolis newsroom shooting are said to be reasons, despite that tariff being rescinded now:

Quote:During its third-quarter conference call, the company said it recorded a net loss of $4.2 million in the three months ending Sept. 30, all of it attributable to newsprint tariff costs that have since been rescinded and costs following the June 28 fatal shooting of five members of the company’s The Capital newsroom in Annapolis. 

“Based on the ongoing trends in our industry, we need to make some difficult decisions to align our costs with revenue trends,” Tribune’s human resources director noted in the memo.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)