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BLADE RUNNER 2049 - POST Release
#36
AI'm just blown away by that. It was so strong and sad, complicated and simple. I never picked up on who Deckards child was. I just didn't connect it, and the final reveal just knocked me down. But this is Gosling's film, and he is brilliant in it. His relationship with Joi broke my heart. It doesn't need a sequel, but I hate where he was left.

This wasn't like the first film, this one is in a hurry, and wants to pursue the plot with lots of dialogue and movement. The music is amazing, the look of the film was incredible, and it left me with so many questions.

I thought Gaff's origami was a sheep.
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#37
AJust got out of this: believe the hype.

It's a damn good sequel and a fantastic film in its own right.
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#38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jones View Post

I thought Gaff's origami was a sheep.

It is a sheep. Its a callback to the original Philiph K Dic story, Do androids dream of electric sheep?



Quote:

Originally Posted by Freeman View Post
 

I don't really get why the daughter was SOOOOO important to Jared Leto.  "I can never make enough, but if they could reproduce, it's the next step in evolution!"  ...  Humans can reproduce.  Just use humans for whatever tasks you need.  There's a throwaway line about slavery of humans being unthinkable but I don't fucking think so, that world clearly had some fucked up stuff going on clearly slavery would be no issue. What, Replicants can bench really heavy?  So what built a mech exoskeleton for humans, it's the future.



Replicants are made superior to human in strenght, endurance and more in order to be used as manual labor, soldiers and workers in the space colonies, simply because this is a practical advanced future were its cheaper and less wasteful to have a disposable work force (Wallace even mentions how every great civilization is build on the back of slaves).


Wallace wants the secret of natural replicant reproduction because that would solve humanity's ambitions on space; no more tailor made slaves, but natural born and bred; in this society.



As for the nature of Deckard:



Im going to go with human, for one simple reason:
The child of him and Rachael is not a perfect replicant, because of her weakened inmune system that kept her from going off world, which she has because she is an hybrid.

Its also thematically strong, because Wallace expects a perfect replicant child, and the truth is that Deckard and Rachael's daughter is flawed and weak.

Loved that.

This movie gets that the nature of Deckar is not important, his actions are; thats why it leaves it ambiguous.  That it respects the original 1982 film to that point makes me love this film even more.

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#39
Quote:

Originally Posted by Freeman View Post
 

I don't really get why the daughter was SOOOOO important to Jared Leto.  "I can never make enough, but if they could reproduce, it's the next step in evolution!"  ...  Humans can reproduce.  Just use humans for whatever tasks you need.  There's a throwaway line about slavery of humans being unthinkable but I don't fucking think so, that world clearly had some fucked up stuff going on clearly slavery would be no issue. What, Replicants can bench really heavy?  So what built a mech exoskeleton for humans, it's the future.



I liked the K and Joi relationship. It was honestly the closest the movie had to a heart and soul for me.




Dude, seriously?

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#40
Quote:
Originally Posted by HunterTarantino View Post
 

Couldn't have loved it more. Hot damn. I don't know if I'd call it better than the original, but it succeeds more in emotion. Villeneuve knocked it out of the park.



Gosling, Ford et al were tremendous. Deakins and the VFX team better fucking win Oscars. Not sure why the Sean Young hate. I've cringed at the de-aging effects in Tron Legacy and every Marvel movie, but I wasn't distracted. Deakins probably smoothed the shit out of it.



It's the anti-Prometheus. Ridley would've dragged the Officer K reveal till two hours in and it sets up an absolutely tremendous story arc.


I would. I really, really would. Especially for the reason you mention. That doesn't lessen the original in any way, but 2049 is the rare sequel that is every bit superior to the original.




I think the thing I love the most about 2049 is that it in no way feels like Blade Runner 2.0. The fact that it was released as is, doubling down on all the things that made the original film what it was instead of simply being an effects-heavy blockbuster is a minor miracle.

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#41
Quote:

Originally Posted by ryoken View Post
 

It is a sheep. Its a callback to the original Philiph K Dic story, Do androids dream of electric sheep?


Replicants are made superior to human in strenght, endurance and more in order to be used as manual labor, soldiers and workers in the space colonies, simply because this is a practical advanced future were its cheaper and less wasteful to have a disposable work force (Wallace even mentions how every great civilization is build on the back of slaves).


Wallace wants the secret of natural replicant reproduction because that would solve humanity's ambitions on space; no more tailor made slaves, but natural born and bred; in this society.


.



Yes. Replicants are ideal for colony work. They can supress human rebellions, work in very very dangerous conditions and survive injuries that would kill a normal human, so they are ideal.



No. Letting replicants self reproduce is horrific business sense. At least fourteen or fifteen years until they are any practical use, 9 months to grow one. Difficulty in upselling new models and in actually making profit out of the new ones that pop out.



Sure, I can see ways you can do it. Send them out to a far planet with colonization instructions, implant them think they are regular colonists. Get them to tame the planet and build the infrastructure and have them genetically self destruct after 5 generations or so, ready for the real colonists.



But it just strikes me as easier to use the replicants you HAVE to build more replicant factories. *shrug*

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#42
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ska Oreo View Post
 



Dude, seriously?


Speaking theoretically, what tasks can replicants complete that humans cannot with cool technology like the Aliens power loader which is no doubt cheaper?

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#43
Quote:

Originally Posted by Freeman View Post
 

Speaking theoretically, what tasks can replicants complete that humans cannot with cool technology like the Aliens power loader which is no doubt cheaper?



Mining comes to mind. Crawling into tight spaces with diggers and stuff. Anything involving shitty atmosphere or punishing psychological conditions. Being cramped into a crappy 4 metre square module with six others for eight months whilst you prepare a planet with a hostile environment.



Combat, as specified. Faster and more accurate.



Let me turn it around. What tasks can a human do better with a power loader that a replicant can't do ten times better with the same powerloader? Humans demand coffee breaks.

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#44
Quote:

Originally Posted by Freeman View Post
 

Speaking theoretically, what tasks can replicants complete that humans cannot with cool technology like the Aliens power loader which is no doubt cheaper?


Dude, SERIOUSLY?!!

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#45
AButt stuff.
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#46
Quote:

Originally Posted by Freeman View Post

Butt stuff.


Nah. I kind of like to know there's a human operator behind the Butt Reaming Power Loader. Feels more intimate that way.

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#47
AI found Robin Wright's character really funny.

"this is going to BREAK THE WOOOORLD!!!"

I actually didn't see the final reveal coming for some reason. But then, I can be really obtuse about stuff like that.

That said, while I liked how it played out... I can't say I was particularly moved or all that emotionally invested in it beyond the specific performances.

I have a feeling that audiences are going to be more engaged with the Joe and Joi relationship. Mostly because the movie spends a lot of screentime on it.


boy am I glad that this didn't come to some kind of big revolution finale that it hints at
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#48

I liked Robin Wrights reaction to a glass shattered in her hand that was full of of booze, maybe one of the more painful things imaginable was bemusement.

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#49
A"yes of course this would happen to me... ungh..."
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#50

She was just so ready and willing to die, like she was super bored or something!  At least show the slightest interest in your life girl!



"Go ahead and stab me, it'll be more interesting than this conversation!"

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#51
Acareful with the potential spoilers in the first few lines of your posts
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#52

Dude, this is a hard-boiled crime noir-- When you get your ass kicked, you respond with little more than annoyance. And when you face your end, always, ALWAYS, fire back with a one-liner.

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#53
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ska Oreo View Post
 

Dude, this is a hard-boiled crime noir-- When you get your ass kicked, you respond with little more than annoyance. And when you face your end, always, ALWAYS, fire back with a one-liner.


Ohhhhhhhh myyyyyyy Gooooooood I get itttttttttttt you want to suck this movies dick, geez.  Let me laugh about the little things at least!

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#54
Quote:

Originally Posted by Freeman View Post
 

Ohhhhhhhh myyyyyyy Gooooooood I get itttttttttttt you want to suck this movies dick, geez.  Let me laugh about the little things at least!


No.

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#55
Athis movie didn't really ever feel all that hard-boiled to me

as some have suggested, it felt a bit too precious about itself for that


BUT, it had some nice moments that touched on whatever 'hard-boiled' can mean for someone

I really liked Wright's last moment.

I also enjoyed her head bonk
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#56

I thought it was super duper awesome how long it took Deckard to stop being such an asshole to poor Officer K.  It became very humorous for me.  In a good way.



*exhausted from punching*



"... I like this song."

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#57
Quote:

Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

this movie didn't really ever feel all that hard-boiled to me

as some have suggested, it felt a bit too precious about itself for that


BUT, it had some nice moments that touched on whatever 'hard-boiled' can mean for someone

I really liked Wright's last moment.

I also enjoyed her head bonk

I think it did. Especially with K, and especially when he goes into Replicant-Terminator mode.

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#58
AI think we must have very different definitions of what hard-boiled entails!
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#59

I think of eggs!

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#60
A[quote name="Arjen Rudd" url="/community/t/159680/blade-runner-2049-post-release#post_4377112"]Is there any reason to think Deckard is a replicant anymore? He's aging, he's still no match for one in a fight, and it doesn't appear to matter in the slightest if he is or not.
[/quote]

If Deckard isn't one of the last remaining fertile Nexus-6 replicants, if he doesn't contain the key to making more in the cells of his body, than Leto doesn't need him for anything.

Having had the night to think it over, my problem with Leto's character goes beyond Leto's acting choices. The feeling that this character belongs in a different movie starts with the writing of his scenes. The script tries to make this technocrat into some kind of archetypal Miltonian devil, as if a regular human who revitalized a slavery industry wouldn't be evil enough. There's something terribly theatrical and stagey about having him make his secretary watch while he wakes up a newborn replicant, fondles it, and murders it, all while he complains that humanity hasn't spread to enough planets because he can't make slaves fast enough to meet demands, when the script could have simply had him say that shit in a board room meeting. I don't see the need to frame the character as some kind of Chernabog, when slavery was a form of evil that ordinary human beings managed to be capable of historically.

I'm still gonna see this a second time this weekend.

_
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#61
AI'm still unpacking my issues with the movie. I enjoyed it for the most part, but I think it kind of goes off the rails when K finds out he's actually not Deckard's kid. The movie wants to be about a Replicant who retires his own kind, but justifies it by saying his kind doesn't run. Then he's given a very compelling reason to run, and then the movie tries to pile on one extra twist that takes away his motivation to run.

And the end fight just feels like they ran out of money.
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#62

I dunno!  shooting with a bunch of water is really expensive!!!

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#63
AIt actually took weeks to shoot all those angles of Deckard's head about to go underwater.

I just hate finales where the hero basically just wins by using brute strength. I want him to be all but beaten and then use cunning and guile to overcome the bad guy.
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#64
Quote:

Originally Posted by Bradito View Post


I just hate finales where the hero basically just wins by using brute strength. I want him to be all but beaten and then use cunning and guile to overcome the bad guy.

I don't disagree with this.



it's all so arbitrary

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#65
AThe evil Replicant lady is so adorbs.
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#66

Yes, there was nothing... inherent about the fight. No establishment of Luv's weaknesses, no using of K's strengths. Just a simple brawl that boiled down to who could strangle someone someone drowned someone. That didn't sit well with me either.



And the 'ticking clock' aspect of the final fight (always important) was basically just Harrison Ford looking pissed off as people threw buckets of water at him.

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#67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post

The evil Replicant lady is so adorbs.

she's great!



Quote:
Originally Posted by flint View Post
 


And the 'ticking clock' aspect of the final fight (always important) was basically just Harrison Ford looking pissed off as people threw buckets of water at him.



hahahahah



I think I mostly gave that sequence a pass because of Hoeks' gung-ho performance... and because I was grateful the movie wasn't going to become actually about the replicant revolution and some obligatory final battle against jared leto

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#68
AI like how the one-eyed lady who I guess was supposed to be some big reveal that made me feel like I'd missed something sets up this revolution that doesn't happen.

O-kay.
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#69

a good revolution!  for another time!!

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#70
A[quote name="Reasor" url="/community/t/159680/blade-runner-2049-post-release#post_4376983"]Loved the sound design.

Loved the visual world building, from the panoramic vistas to the street level scenes of holographic ads getting into the faces of people who just trying to walk down the sidewalk.

LOVED the decision to make K's replicant status clear from the moment Sapper Morton starts counterinterrogating him.

I loved all the little things about JOI:
the fact that K keeps his own privately owned artificial person, who keeps him company;
the fact that his makers couldn't iron that basic human need for someone to connect to out of their replicants;
the fact that everyone seems to recognize her ring tone when it goes off, and how that shapes their perceptions of K;
the fact that she seems to show genuine love for him, opening up a whole new can of worms about artificial persons as property.

I loved the inverse Voight-Kampff test where K's supervisors check to make sure he's not affected by his work.

I loved the fake-out about the identity of Deckard's and Rachel's child. It fooled me twice. I believed it was K, and then I (briefly) assumed that it must be Mariette.

I loved the fact that the replicant army in the sewers and the coming war for independence is not the point of the movie, and never gets resolved. For everything else that's going on, it remains a gumshoe detective picture about cracking the case and doing the right thing.

Jared Leto is the only thing dragging the picture down. One line of dialogue from Silvia Hoeks' character, about how she's taking Deckard to her boss so that he can learn how to breed a slave race, would have enabled Villeneuve to cut Leto's scenes entirely, to the movie's benefit.[/quote]

Well I was about to write a novel, but Reasor just basically said how I feel about everything. I didn't mind Leto as much as you did, but boy it's like you were inside my brain otherwise man.

Letting K be a no-shit Replicant from moment 1 was fantastic. And the bait-and-switch on his memory made me like him MORE - I hate the "You're Special!" trend in our heroes of late, and having him in the end just be a Replicant beat cop after all for me made the difference between this being a beautiful fan-fic film (*cough Forwakens cough*) or being a no-shit Blade Runner film. This was decidedly the latter.

I find it insane some folks thought de-aged Rachel was less believable than resurrected Tarkin - I thought it was damn near flawless, and you must all be on drugs.

I agree there was maybe one too many call-backs - the initial recording of Rachel's VK test was all you needed. The voice recording of them meeting, PLUS the memory flashback of her entering the room, PLUS the resurrected brown-eyed Rachel was a few sledgehammers much.

That the movie remained small in scope, and preserved Deckard's status as a mystery, are not one but two miracles.

I went in expecting a larger scale story about humans becoming Replicants or vice verse line blurring, so with all preconceptions that's coloring my ability to judge the story objectively, but my initial feeling is that I really love they made a small story as a follow-on to a small story.

I absolutely cannot wait to see this again.
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