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The Lost Art of the Intermission
I saw "The Postman" in the theater and seem to remember it having an intermission. I don't recall if I took a leak, tho.
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forgetting if you took a leak is symbolic of the way the world of the POSTMAN forgot that hope could come in the mail
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I wonder, then, if that was some demand made on distributors, and could differ country to country. I saw "Wolves" in the theater here and I'm almost positive there was no intermission (it *has* been 28 years). 

I do remember feeling the length of that shit, too. I think the longest movie I'd seen in a theater at that point was "Hunt for Red October". First intermission I remember was a "Lawrence of Arabia" repertory screening, around that same era.

Certainly by the time "Schindler's List" rolled around a couple years later, intermissions were a thing of the past, right? Had to change for good sonewhere in there.
Our sanitariums are full of men who think they're Napoleon... Or God.
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I assume Branagh's HAMLET had to have an intermission in 1996?

Was that film a major wide release?


edit: NOPE. Just looked it up. It only went as wide as 93 theaters, according to boxofficemojo
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I saw that-- Inwood Theater in Dallas. I think there had to be one-- nobody can sit through 4 1/2 hours-- but I don't remember. Probably went out to the lobby for a drink and a smoke (you could smoke in the lobby then!).

"Titanic" definitely did not have one, correct? I never saw that.
Our sanitariums are full of men who think they're Napoleon... Or God.
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TITANIC did not
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I saw that four-hour Soderbergh "Che" movie, which is literally two separate movies; even the aspect ratio is different in the second film. They had an intermission and I took a leak in 2.35.
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(06-30-2018, 10:16 PM)bradito Wrote: I saw that four-hour Soderbergh "Che" movie, which is literally two separate movies; even the aspect ratio is different in the second film. They had an intermission and I took a leak in 2.35.

Philistine.

Only leaks in 1.6180 can be considered golden.
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I watched The Hateful Eight for the first time in two years the other day, and the "intermission" in which Tarantino pops in to update us on what's been going on the last 15 minutes really worked for me this time.

The first time it was very jarring, perhaps because the movie's mean-spirited violence takes some getting used to, but this time it clicked that Tarantino wants us to laugh along with him as we've just now begun to realize what kind of movie this is, and he is inviting us in to his grand guignol.
"I'd rather have hope...than nothing at all."
-Illyana Rasputin, X-Men: Omega #1

"But the public, knowing what it wanted, spinning happily, let the comic books survive."
-Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

Twitter: @BartLBishop
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Apparently in Switzerland they have intermissions - my friend had one when she saw INFINITY WAR. It seemed like it was completely arbitrary where they chose to put it, though. It might come back to any intermissions having to be signed off by the studios, so I wonder if this is a US-only thing.

Speaking of intermissions, we went to ICEMAN COMETH (the Denzel production) this week, and the way they chose to do things was fascinating. The play is about 4 hours long with intermissions, so there was a 10 minute break after act one, then a brief "pause" of 5 minutes for them to reset the stage between act two and three, and then a final 10 minute break after act three. I'd never seen something with a pause like that before - particularly because the lights went up, but people were told they didn't have time to go the bathroom.

In the past couple of years, I've seen a bunch of different Shakespeare productions, and it's always fascinating to see where they choose to put intermission. The Trump-themed Julius Caesar had no intermission and played straight through. I think the Oscar Isaac Hamlet had 1 or 2. Othello only had 1. I've also found they're more likely to break after the first three acts and then conclude with the last two.
home taping is killing music
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My school’s theatre program had a full semester class on dramaturgy, which is really just a fancy way of saying What To Cut. Almost no one does the full texts of Shakespeare, Marlowe or even Brecht. Julius Caesar with no break sounds awful unless they hacked a ton out of it.

We spent a whole day on intermissions. Between 3 and 4 is so traditional it’s almost iron clad, and I’m glad people are experimenting with moving it around again.
“I feel a connection with you. A man connection. A mannection.”
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If I understand right, many of of Shakespeare's longer plays weren't performed in their entirety even when he wrote them-- he may have actually expanded them for print later.

I think I may prefer Zeffirelli's lean, mean Hamlet starring Mel to Branagh's , and not just on length. Both are good, though.
Our sanitariums are full of men who think they're Napoleon... Or God.
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(06-30-2018, 09:27 PM)slim Wrote: I wonder, then, if that was some demand made on distributors, and could differ country to country. I saw "Wolves" in the theater here and I'm almost positive there was no intermission (it *has* been 28 years). 

I do remember feeling the length of that shit, too. I think the longest movie I'd seen in a theater at that point was "Hunt for Red October". First intermission I remember was a "Lawrence of Arabia" repertory screening, around that same era.

Certainly by the time "Schindler's List" rolled around a couple years later, intermissions were a thing of the past, right? Had to change for good sonewhere in there.

Yeah, must be a regional thing - "Schindler's List" also had an intermission when I saw it on release in Glasgow. I think it happened when Neeson and Kingsley were contemplating an empty factory after their workers had been shipped to the Ghetto.
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The Caesar moved, and IRRC, it's one of Shakespeare's shorter plays, so I don't think they cut much. This was the now-infamous production in Central Park where Caesar (TV's Gregg Henry) was played as a Trump type. I think it was maybe 2 hours.
home taping is killing music
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(07-01-2018, 10:49 AM)lightning slim Wrote: My school’s theatre program had a full semester class on dramaturgy, which is really just a fancy way of saying What To Cut. Almost no one does the full texts of Shakespeare, Marlowe or even Brecht. Julius Caesar with no break sounds awful unless they hacked a ton out of it.

We spent a whole day on intermissions. Between 3 and 4 is so traditional it’s almost iron clad, and I’m glad people are experimenting with moving it around again.

(07-01-2018, 01:21 PM)slim Wrote: If I understand right, many of of Shakespeare's longer plays weren't performed in their entirety even when he wrote them-- he may have actually expanded them for print later.

I think I may prefer Zeffirelli's lean, mean Hamlet starring Mel to Branagh's , and not just on length. Both are good, though.

(07-01-2018, 06:39 PM)boone daniels Wrote: The Caesar moved, and IRRC, it's one of Shakespeare's shorter plays, so I don't think they cut much. This was the now-infamous production in Central Park where Caesar (TV's Gregg Henry) was played as a Trump type. I think it was maybe 2 hours.

I saw a production of Richard III that was heavily cut up because it is Shakespeare's second longest play, following Hamlet. It was good, but heavily cut and the break came right at the midpoint, time wise. Few film productions of Romeo and Juliet ever kill Count Paris, and the one version I saw at the Stratford Festival cut a healthy amount of lines from that scene. There are like 3 very different versions of King Lear and though I read them in college in comparison, the two productions I have seen are all mish mashes from the three that make most sense to that director. The intermission there is between Acts 3 and 4.

As for Caesar, a play I teach every year, we have a conversation about where to put an intermission. I always want to intermission it right at the end of Act 2, BEFORE the death of Caesar. Traditionally it is right after Brutus and Cassius get run out of town at the end of Act 3, but most of Act 4 and 5 are preening egos or filled with chaotic battles filled with people we haven't met before Act 5, so that is where I would cut the most. I also hate the Caesar's ghost scene.

On the intermission for movie fronts, having bought the LOTR extended editions on DVD before the Bluray format, I really like where it makes me change disks. Those are great stopping points for a restroom break. I really wish they had done that in theaters in the theatricals.
"Wilford Brimley can't be bothered to accept praise. He doesn't act because he thinks people will enjoy his work. He acts because it's his goddamned job." --Will Harris, AV Club
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I'm seeing a live concert performance of the original star war tonight

I think someone earlier in the thread has been to one of these and described where the intermission happened. It sounded like an awkward place to me, so I wonder if tonight's performance will have it in the same place...
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Hopefully it's after everyone gets medals but Chewbacca.
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It was!
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