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Charlie Manson's Hollywood
#1

Charles Manson is dead.



I just finished listening to the first episode of Karina Longworth's "You Must Remember This" podcast on Manson. I'd heard the series was definitive, but I wasn't prepared for how right off the bat it goes from riveting to outright disturbing. I'm not a true crime guy, I was more than a little hazy on the details of the murders, so the quiet, matter of fact descriptions made my blood run cold.



I AM a Horror guy, and no film in a long time has left me slightly shaky like her narrative breakdown of what unfolded.



Anyway, many of you have already listened to this, but I thought it would be interesting to have a Thread to recommend the best books or documentaries, or just talk about all the fucked up aspects of Manson and the Family, and discuss the odd six degrees of separation he had to the Hollywood community at the time.



Here's a curio to kick start things:



13 Films Based On Charles Manson And The Manson Family Murders

https://www.investigationdiscovery.com/c...ly-murders


EDIT: here's a link to first episode of the podcast





"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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#2

Yeah, Longworth's Manson in Hollywood series may be the high point of You Must Remember This (though the Gable/Lombard episode is a hell of a thing). It's an incredibly disturbing listen all the way through, and the episode that finally covers the murders is truly horrifying.

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#3
ADo we really need a thread on this?
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#4

2nd episode deftly paints the picture of how the monster was created:



Charles Manson's Hollywood, Part 2: Charlie Manson Finds His Family



http://www.youmustrememberthispodcast.co...his-family


"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#5

This has kind of haunted me since reading a month or so ago:



Dianne Lake: Charles Manson’s Youngest Follower Talks To CrimeFeed About Her New Memoir





"In 1967, my family had tuned in, turned on, and dropped out. My dad got involved with the Oracle, and my mom discovered marijuana. Timothy Leary, Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, and all those writers had long won my dad’s mind and his heart, so for the second time in her life, my mom gave up everything to follow my dad.

But I just didn’t fit in. A sexually active 14-year-old just didn’t fit with the counterculture. I was jailbait!



My parents ended up on [the famous counterculture commune] the Hog Farm, and one day [Hog Farm leaders] Wavy Gravy and his wife Bonnie Jean told me — in a nice way — I just didn’t belong there. They didn’t want me around. I was jailbait!


I ended up living with another couple for a while, and they introduced me to Charlie. I didn’t know it, but my mom had already met Charlie and gave him my picture. I was in San Francisco, so she gave him my picture and told him my name and said to him, “If you’re in San Francisco, look for her!”



So the day I met the Family, all the girls were ecstatic. They were saying, “It’s Dianne! She’s here!” I had never heard of these people, and they knew me from the picture. So I immediately felt accepted, right after being told I didn’t belong, after being rejected. I didn’t fit in right away, but over the next two or three weeks, I did."



"My parents bought in early on to — even though this wasn’t a phrase yet — “It takes a village to raise a child.” The idea that with everybody there, somebody would always be looking out for the kids. That’s not how it always works."


"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#6

Serial Killer Cinema: 4 Noteworthy Documentaries About Charles Manson & The Manson Family






MANSON (1973)


“There are no actors in this film.” That’s the message announced onscreen at the start of Manson, a scrambled collection of interviews with Manson Family members, news footage, and psychedelic visual effects.


Directors Robert Hendrickson and Laurence Merrick shot extensively at Spahn Movie Ranch, the Manson Family’s headquarters. Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme and other shaved-head, shotgun-pumping female followers still living there spout rapturously about revolution and Charlie’s kingdom to come.



Manson actually nabbed an Academy Award nomination for Best Feature Documentary, but lost to the extraordinary (and not entirely unrelated) Marjoe.



In 1976, Squeaky Fromme attempted to assassinate President Gerald Ford, prompting California authorities to order Manson temporarily removed from circulation in the state so as not to influence jury members. Distributors immediately, then, rushed it into theaters everywhere else, emblazoned with the bold tagline, “Banned in California!”


"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#7

"love this anecdote about David Lynch discovering that his daughter Jennifer Lynch was reading about Charles Manson"




https://twitter.com/BBW_BFF/status/905454179874783232







"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#8

Since no one seems interested in rehashing this series, or discussing the topic, I'll let the Thread die.



I just want to add that as small a tragedy as it was in the scheme of things, Dennis Wilson's naïve interaction with Manson and his subsequent psychological devastation and emotional ruination was indeed its own sad little thing .



There's such a black irony in the all-American Beach Boys being almost being the Rosencrantz and Guildenstern of this sick play.






http://www.youmustrememberthispodcast.co...songwriter


"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#9
AUm. Anyone watch the Duchovny series, Aquarius? Only lasted 2 seasons, and parts were plain bad, but the actor’s take on Manson and his following were interesting.
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#10

This is kind of a mind blower:



Unholy Communion: Does A Satanic Cult Connect “Son Of Sam” To Charles Manson?




"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#11
Debated bumping this, but what the hell.

CHARLIE SAYS in theatres/ VOD this weekend. The director is Mary Harron, which is quite intriguing if you've seen her I SHOT ANDY WARHOL. The subject doesn't need a sympathetic touch, but perhaps the humanity in the warped mind (s) and ruined lives.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#12
CHARLIE SAYS: Finally got around to this, and was moved. A compassionate film is the best way to frame it. It makes you feel empathy for every player except Manson himself. And even with him, Mary Harron chooses to avoid the usual wild-eyed crazy performance, instead depicting him as 'The Family' sees him - smooth and charming -he's like the devil playing a game; tricking and seducing.

The film juxtapositions a graduate student assigned to try to work with and deprogram the Manson girls stranded on death row, and through flashback how they become what they have become - you see how already lost and broken, they were manipulated into becoming true believers of a false messiah.

The whole story is almost an upside down blasphemous Christian story - with these women imprisoned together, still brainwashed, keeping Manson's teachings alive (re-indoctrinating themselves daily); even after the horror of the murders believing the message and waiting for the return.

So, it IS ultimately moving when a breakthrough happens.

The graduate student is conflicted about what good it would do to make them see how everything they believe is bullshit and have them come to a true realization of what they have done. They'd have to live with it forever. Her boss reminds her that's what prison is for, and to understand, gives them a chance for some kind of atonement.

The flashback section jumbles the timeline, and perhaps pulls its punches, but the movie is about these Manson girls and the victims. It helps you understand/ sympathize with the descent into hell of the former, while never not doing right by the later.

The film makes you feel the tragedy, and mourn the lives and souls lost and destroyed by the darkness of one small, evil man.

Strong recommendation.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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