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Trudopia Now
#1
AI think it's only fair for the Canadians on the board to have a thread where we can be critical of our leadership as well.

I simply just can't take it anymore.

To be fair, Justin Trudeau is fielding a question by what sounds like a meandering religious nut, but his correction of a certain word of common language is finally a tipping point for a lot of Canadians:

[video]https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=57&v=cR9MuNnznFU[/video]

And what is his explanation for this?

It was just a dumb joke, hur hurrrrrrr.

[video]https://youtu.be/wG01jWQ0yCc[/video]

And just as this whole mess goes viral, what's his next strategy? To try and impose punishment on Facebook for propagating fake news.

https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2018...-else.html

Where have we heard that before...........?

And all the while, for some reason, our Prime Minister is touring US colleges.
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#2

Despite living in a northern border state, I know very little of Trudeau beyond the handsome, liberal crusader image some in the US have of him. Or having the persona of wokest politician of all mankind (peoplekind!) as this article puts in. He seems to be popular in the States simply because he is not Trump. Is he exaggerating his person or is Trudeau yet another politician who has discovered good intentions don't always translate into effective policy? 

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#3

I'm not sure if this thread is for ragging on JT or supporting him, but there's this:



I'm proud of our cabinet's diversity and qualifications.

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#4

We can criticize and praise our PM like anyone else.  Nobody's perfect.



I'm not exactly enamored with him right now due to the whole forcing the Kinder Morgan pipeline down our throats. I'm glad our NDP/Green coalition government are pushing back on that.

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#5
ALegally approved = forced down throat

JT is as obnoxious a hypocrite as his old man. Canadian politics are such a joke, one can only dream of getting hooked up to the sweet sweet government tit. And the worst part is he's the best choice.
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#6

Our tax rate is pretty much the same as the US when you factor in health care costs.  Better cops, better teachers, better libraries, bike access, cheap cheap cheap Nuclear power, and amazing parks and public events (Winterlude, Mosaica, etc.) ... it's just the little things that make it so much better.  The only thing I can't get used to is that people are much more obnoxious when they don't live in a police-state, but it's mostly tolerable.



JT's doing his thing.  He's learning on the job and could be doing A LOT worse.

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#7
ALet’s be honest here; considering the current situation and the rest of the world, JT is a pretty solid and estable leader for his country.
One D is a hell of a difference.
And yes, I know Canadian politics can and are as complex and wrenching as USA ones, but right now?
Most gringos would take a JT over DJT in a heartbeat.
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#8

Here is our Prime Minister essentially jury tampering:





“I’m not going to comment on the process that led us to this point today, but I am going to say we have come to this point as a country far too many times…Indigenous people across this country are angry, they’re heartbroken, and I know Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians alike know that we have to do better.”



Our Prime Minister is basically alluding that the jury for the Gerald Stanley were racists.  They found a white man not guilty in for second degree murder or manslaughter of an Indigenous man because of racism.  Whether he made this comment to pander for votes, or to further his ideology, but what he did was wrong.



I highly doubt while JT was touring the US to talk about NAFTA that he was aware of what the jury was hearing in the court room.  But what he has done is this, if the Crown appeals the not guilty verdict, based on law, how is there going to be a new trial with an impartial jury, when the Prime Minister of the country is scrutinizing their decisions.



750 people were served notice to attend for jury selection.  Of that number roughly 200 arrived.  Of that 200, many were Indigenous people.  A source during the selection process mentioned that a lot of those people were heard making comments about finding Stanley guilty before they heard evidence, even going as far as saying they would hang him.  Of course those people would not be fit for the jury.  So they weren't selected.  The Crown and Defense then used their premptory challenges, of which they both have 14, to eliminate jurors to stack the jury more in their favour.  Yes, the defense managed to make sure there weren't any Indigenous people on the jury, but the Crown also made sure that there were not middle aged white males on the jury.



Now, instead of giving JT too much grief, because to be fair he is probably the least experienced Prime Minister we've ever had (He after all only has finished one year in an engineering program) the leader of the NDP, Jagmeet Singh, was a criminal defense lawyer and actually passed the Bar exam.  What does he have to say about the verdict?





So let's just take race entirely of the scenario here because that seems to be what has been injected into being the only thing important about the case.  Here's what happened.  A group of men, who were intoxicated and had one gun, were attempting to steal cars from rural properties.  They went on to a farm and, while attempting to steal a truck and an ATV were confronted by the farmer who owned the property.  The farmer shot three rounds as warning shots with a semi automatic handgun.  He then confronted the group and, while leaning into the vehicle they were in and trying to get the keys from the ignition, the farmer shot a man in the back of the head and killed him.



He was charged with second degree murder.



It is entirely possible the farmer executed the man and his defense would be lies.  However, the defense was that the last round went off, accidentally, as a hangfire.  A hangfire is extremely rare, like, extremely rare.  But the type of ammunition that the farmer loaded in the gun is the most prone to have a hangfire.  And there is precedent in Canadian law that a hangfire was a defense in a trial in the 1980s.  That means it can happen.  The jury sat in the court room, heard evidence from witnesses, experts, the Police, and then weighed that evidence.  They ultimately believed that the gun went off accidentally.



But according to Jagmeet Singh, a defense lawyer, the decision was made because of a legacy of colonialism and genocide.



These comments are irresponsible.



If the Crown ever tried to appeal the verdict,  it would be almost impossible to find impartial jury members.  It's sickening.

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#9

Politicians jumping in on controversial cases when they shouldn't isn't that usual though.  Not great, but not unusual.  It seems like you could take what they are saying as pat of a general trend, kind of like comments around Trayvon Martin that were really talking about the police and not specifically related to that case, but it sparked such comments regardless.  But I don't know.  Has there been a spate of violence towards Indigenous people of late?



Seems like much would depend on the details in this case.  How do you prove something was a hang fire?  Was the gun back in his pocket when it went off or something?


I may not understand the problem.  If it's a hang fire doesn't that mean instead of firing 3 times into the air he actually fired 4 but the last one didn't go off and he didn't notice?  That kind of thing makes me queasy just thinking about it.

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#10

I'm embarrassed to say that I only just worked out this was a thread about Canada. Been seeing the title for a while and was wondering if this was a movie or TV show or what? Somehow managed to miss the Political Discourse tag until just then too.



I'm guessing the banishing of Harper gave your current PM a lot of good will. I've heard secondhand and from people I know that people were a little less than enamoured by him ...

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#11
My knowledge of Toronto mayoral candidate Faith Goldy is low outside of this article.  I also haven't checked in on the race or just how low Goldy is polling.  I do, however, know racist Rep. Steve King of Iowa well.  His endorsement would be all I need to stay the fuck away:

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/whi...mg00000067

Quote:A man who spouts white supremacist views from his perch in Congress has endorsed another white supremacist vying to become Toronto’s next mayor. 

Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) on Monday tweeted out his support of Faith Goldy, a far-right white nationalist who is looking to lead Canada’s largest city. 

“Faith Goldy, an excellent candidate for Toronto mayor, pro Rule of Law, pro Make Canada Safe Again, pro balanced budget, & ...BEST of all, Pro Western Civilization and a fighter for our values,” King tweeted. He added that the mayoral candidate “will not be silenced.”

As Right Wing Watch and Splinter News point out, Goldy is an openly racist white nationalist who has at times recited the infamous “14 words” used by neo-Nazis in reference to preserving the white race. After the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, last year in which anti-racist protester Heather Heyer was killed by a white supremacist, Goldy was fired after going on a podcast for the white supremacist website The Daily Stormer. Goldy has also previously recommended a book calling for the “elimination of Jews” and said on a podcast that she believed homosexuality was a reason for the Holocaust, according to Right Wing Watch.

King’s endorsement of Goldy is hardly a surprise. The Republican lawmaker is himself a white supremacist who constantly retweets other white supremacists on Twitter. He has promoted a neo-Nazi on Twitter and advocated against “mixing cultures.”
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#12
I'm seeing a lot of space in between peoples comments here, WTH is up with that?

Lots of this- < p > & nbsp ; < /p >  (minus the extra spaces I added so that it would be visible)
I used to be with "it", but then they changed what "it" was. Now, what I'm with isn't "it", and what's "it" seems weird and scary to me. -Grandpa Simpson
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#13
Canada legalizing weed is the only good news I've read today.  Everything else has been murder, extinction, and GOP cutting the social safety net.

Thanks Canada!
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#14
Well technically it's not legalized entirely. There are restrictions to how much you can possess in public (equivalent to 30 grams of dried marijuana) and there are harsh penalties to selling and distributing to minors. But yep I could order marijuana right now from the online Ontario Cannabis Store if I wanted to. Canada Post (the only authorized body that can deliver it) is threatening to strike on Monday so... we'll see.

To add a bit more confusion there is a federal Cannabis Act, and there are provincial Cannabis Acts, both with different authorities and definitions. For instance the federal act refers to "young person" which by law means anyone under age 18, and the Ontario act refers to a minor which matches the drinking age in Ontario as 19 years old.

For now people can still be charged criminally for certain offences because the federal government has not figured out the discretionary ticketing option that the Police can use to fine people instead of charge them. However, the Police could choose to just charge them under the provincial act instead and fine them that way.

It's a mess, really, legislation wise because certain authorities exist in certain acts and the Police can't use search and seizure authorities in the provincial act in order to charge people under the federal acts. And I think those complications will give it the veil of total legalization because the Police now have to additional acts to know off the top of their head while enforcing cannabis possession.

That was a long spiel but yep you can now buy cannabis online.

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#15
(10-17-2018, 02:36 PM)vtran Wrote: I'm seeing a lot of space in between peoples comments here, WTH is up with that?

Lots of this- < p > & nbsp ; < /p >  (minus the extra spaces I added so that it would be visible)

It's all the old code and formatting from the CHUD forum change over.
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#16
It's extra comical in Saskatchewan, Catartik, as none of the provincially approved weed shops have any stock, yet, so you can't buy any here, anyway. To make the situation even goofier, the province limited where you can use it so much that you better hope you own your own detached dwelling if you want to sample it...cause that's pretty much the only place you can.
AI'm not afraid of you...I watched hockey with Michael Ironside!....and he's a goddamn Leafs fan.
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#17
I'm high right now #burnout. But yeah the lines were insane today, drove around to a few places just to scope it out. It'll take a decade or more for people to change attitudes on mary j. Once a DRUG always evul to certain peeps.
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#18
On October 2, someone tried burning down the Radisson Hotel Toronto East.  There's no suspect or motive yet, but there are 577 refugees and asylum seekers housed there and a witness said "white nationalists" had gathered outside the hotel earlier in the day.  

This article pieces together various threads that could've led a white nationalist to attempt to burn down the hotel, including a right-wing video that went viral and a Tucker Carlson/Daily Caller "report."

https://www.bellingcat.com/news/americas...s-toronto/

Quote:On October 2, a lone arsonist entered the Radisson Hotel Toronto East and ignited a can of gasoline. It was left burning in a hallway on the third floor, but was found by an employee and kicked down a stairwell before the fire could spread very far. The arson attempt terrified the 577 refugees and asylum-seekers housed at the Radisson by the Canadian government.

Mario Calla, executive director of COSTI Immigrant Services, told City News that “white nationalists” had gathered outside the hotel earlier on the day of the fire.

The Toronto Police have not yet found any particular motivation behind the crime. Media Relations Officer Caroline de Cloet told Bellingcat that the department had “no reason” to believe the arson attempt was linked to anti-refugee sentiment. “We don’t speculate on our investigations,” she added.

This has not stopped many others from speculating that the arson attempt was the end result of what The Star dubbed an “online anti-refugee campaign.” Reporting on this campaign has tended to focus on a single 5 minute 51 second video entitled “Trudeau’s Refugee Hotel Exposed.”

The video was uploaded by ProperGander TV, a small far-right channel dedicated to “promoting Nationalism.” In it four young Canadians wander around the Radisson’s mostly empty and quiet halls, pointing out stains on the walls and alleging that such stains come from feces. They repeatedly claim the smell in the building is unbearable. Despite this, an unedited video of their trip reveals they spent more than thirty-four minutes inside. At one point they approach a garbage can and sniff it and then begin to retch and cough as if moved to nausea.

Since the five minute version of the video received more than 200,000 views, some have suggested it sparked the arson attack. But ProperGander’s video was actually just one small piece of an ongoing digital assault on refugees housed in hotels by the Canadian government. This article will piece together the evolution of this anti-refugee campaign and document the eventual violent threats it provoked.

And:

Quote:On July 25, 2018, The Daily Caller, a right-wing news site part-owned by Tucker Carlson, published an article: “Trudeau’s Border Control Plan: Place Illegals in Hotels.”

The next day Tucker Carlson himself covered the refugee situation at the Toronto East Radisson on Fox News. The video clip of the coverage uploaded to Fox’s YouTube account titles the segment, “Trudeau’s immigration solution: put illegals in hotels.”

The video is mostly an attack on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. The video and the Daily Caller article do not name the Toronto East Radisson. They don’t allege bad behavior on behalf of the refugees either. The main focus of their criticism are the government’s immigration policies

A one-star review was left on Tripadvisor the same day as the Fox News segment. The review, unfortunately, does not note the exact time of day it was posted. We can’t know for sure it was posted in response to Tucker’s segment, but it blames the “government” for filling “probably ninety percent” of the hotel with refugees. Another one-star review follows. Neither review attacks the refugees themselves.

The tone of the debate changed on August 1, when The Rebel published what they presented as an expose of “shocking damage” done to hotels by “Syrian migrants.” The Rebel articles displayed several government documents that listed complaints of damage done to the hotel by refugee occupants. The YouTube version of the first article has received more than 260,000 views.

The Rebel published five more stories about refugees in Canadian hotels. All of the stories were based on documents covering unnamed Ontario hotels in the first three months of 2016. None of the The Rebel’s coverage acknowledged that they were reporting on two-year-old allegations of petty theft and vandalism. In fact, the way The Rebel displayed their articles made it easy for careless viewers to conclude that it was coverage of something that was currently happening.

In early August, after these articles were published, Tripadvisor received a surge of negative anti-refugee reviews. This surge is difficult to document exactly because the site has since removed a number of reviews they deemed false or abusive. One such deleted review seems to have been directly inspired by The Rebel’s coverage. It was posted four days after an article describing refugees as “ungrateful” — and used the same word to describe them.
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#19
(10-17-2018, 09:10 PM)andronicus Wrote: It's extra comical in Saskatchewan, Catartik, as none of the provincially approved weed shops have any stock, yet, so you can't buy any here, anyway. To make the situation even goofier, the province limited where you can use it so much that you better hope you own your own detached dwelling if you want to sample it...cause that's pretty much the only place you can.

Ontario’s laws are pretty lenient. You can smoke anywhere that you can smoke cigarettes, except for in your vehicle because it’s treated basically the same way as alcohol (provincially at least) and could obviously lead to criminal charges if you’re impaired.

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#20
Justin Trudeau is doing his best to torpedo his re-election next June.

The latest? Defending Statistics Canada demanding Canadians personal banking information, without a warrant, because that information will help the Federal government to create programs to help us.... somehow.

This is all because the previous Conservative government said people would not longer be arrested for refusing to fill out the census form.

I wouldn't be surprised if it's really just to see how much Canadians are spending in other countries while on vacation or how much we are ordering online from the US.

https://nationalpost.com/pmn/news-pmn/ca...estigation

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#21
A question I never asked: "Can someone get charged with witchcraft in modern-day Canada?"

The answer is "yes."

https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2018/10/21..._23567392/

Quote:Halton Regional Police have arrested a 32-year-old woman from Milton, Ont. and charged her with extortion, fraud over $5,000 and pretending to practise witchcraft.

Dorie "Madeena" Stevenson was arrested Thursday after a five-month investigation, according to police. Officers also recovered evidence from her property after executing a search warrant.

One of Stevenson's alleged victims told police they had been defrauded of more than $60,000 after consulting with the woman, who owns the registered business Milton Psychic.

"What we typically see is a tendency for perpetrators to take advantage of persons when they are in their most vulnerable state," Det.-Sgt. Dave Constantini said in a press release. "Victims are manipulated into believing something bad will happen to them unless they remit cash."

"When victims cannot be squeezed any longer, the perpetrators rely on the victim's embarrassment in not contacting police."

Stevenson was charged with "Witchcraft — Fortune Telling," police said. Section 365 of Canada's Criminal Code defines witchcraft in the context of fraud as: 

"Every one who pretends to exercise or to use any kind of witchcraft, sorcery, enchantment or conjuration; undertakes, for a consideration, to tell fortunes; or pretends from his skill in or knowledge of an occult or crafty science to discover where or in what manner anything that is supposed to have been stolen or lost may be found."

Other fairly recent cases where people were charged with pretending to practise witchcraft include:

A Spanish newspaper producer in Toronto who promised to lift a woman's family curse for $14,000

A Mississauga man who in 2013 had charges dropped after he agreed to pay $23,000 in restitution to his two victims

In 2009, a Toronto woman convinced a lawyer to fork over tens of thousands of dollars by claiming she was the manifestation of his dead sister
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#22
There are some artifacts in the criminal code still but the Witchcraft one is fraud related and it does get regularly laid even though it sounds archaic.

There is a major difference between having your palm read, or going to a tarot reading, or seeing a medium because that’s considered entertainment. It’s when those people bilk thousands of dollars out of the gullible that the criminal aspect of it takes effect.

The real fun part is that it’s a defense if you can prove that you truthfully believe you have eerie powers.

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