Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Kevin Smith had a Heart Attack
#1
AKevin Smith had a massive heart attack after a show last night and is in the hospital:
http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/kevi...d=53356673

Hope the dude recovers. He’s not much of a filmmaker anymore but he’s the nicest guy and is still a great speaker.
Reply
#2

That's exactly what killed Darren Shahlavi.



(edit: specifically the Left Anterior Descending artery obstruction)



http://screenanarchy.com/2015/04/martial...-2015.html

Reply
#3
AAw, bless his cotton socks. Dude always seemed like such a sweetheart and now that sweet heart is giving him gip.
Reply
#4

I'll save the mountain of shitty jokes I could make and the judgement on his weight and just hope this husband and father makes a speedy recovery.

Reply
#5

The thing is, he's actually lost a massive amount of weight the last few years. It's hard to tell because he insists on wearing those horrible parachute-sized jerseys, but you can see it in his face and neck (and skinny little legs in some pictures). This is from last year:



Reply
#6
ADidn't he recently lose a ton of weight?
Reply
#7

You can never reduce the risk to zero, also if you have a genetic predisposition or other cardiac defect (case in point above), you're at elevated risk no matter how careful you are (obviously, you'd be even worse off if you didn't).



Also, in Kevin's case, there's also the potential accumulated damage to your blood vessels in the past that can increase your risk. I hear he used to be a heavy smoker even if he's stopped now (that's likely to scar blood vessels and that leads to increased risk of plaque formation and hence obstruction). Also that is a potential issue with marijuana, I've heard (up to a point, smoke is still smoke).

Reply
#8

I'm just going to throw out that Kevin Smith was a big part of my cinephile awakening in the '90s. Right around 1997, at age 13, I discovered Clerks and Mallrats, and not long after his Daredevil run. I remember the controversy over Dogma and how it seemed like Smith was a rebel filmmaker. Seeing Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back in theaters, when Shannen Doherty shows up I said pretty loud, "Brenda?!" and a guy in front of me replied, "Dick!"



About a decade later, and I probably mention this too much, I was working at a newspaper and got to interview him when he was in town for A Night with Kevin Smith. We talked for two hours (possibly because he sounded really high), and I'll never forget that.



So yeah, his filmmaking career has washed up a bit. And sure there was that one time he got kicked off a plane (although the tide has turned in such a way, I wonder if Twitter would be on his side these days for being fatshamed). But so many geek icons have been tainted by recent revelations, it's nice to know Kevin is just this cool, nice, possibly overemotional but genuinely earnest, fella out there maintaining a presence with podcasts, TV shows, and apparently pretty consistent television directing (several episodes of The Flash and Supergirl).



He could maybe say "cat" less.

Reply
#9

Him donating all of that Miramax money to good causes following the Weinstein accusations completely turned me around on Smith.



I sincerely hope he recovers and he's with us for many more years.

Reply
#10

I actually didn't know he'd lost so much weight. Good on him!

Reply
#11

He's probably been reading the CHUD Last Jedi post release thread.

Reply
#12

https://twitter.com/ThatKevinSmith/statu...36/photo/1


:


After the first show this evening, I had a massive heart attack. The Doctor who saved my life told me I had 100% blockage of my LAD artery (aka “the Widow-Maker”). If I hadn’t canceled show 2 to go to the hospital, I would’ve died tonight. But for now, I’m still above ground!


Reply
#13

Glad he pulled through. Had my issues with the man over the years, and not gonna lie, I still do. But as another poster pointed out, he's a husband and father. A human being. Hoping for a speedy recovery.



Honestly I am surprised this only now happened. He's had that weight on him for years. I remember a number of us talking about how obese he was during Zack & Miri Make a Porno and that was right when he became a religious pot-smoker.

Reply
#14

Just a heads up - skinny people have heart attacks too.



Here's to a speedy recovery to Smith.

Reply
#15
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jacob Singer View Post
 

Just a heads up - skinny people have heart attacks too.



Here's to a speedy recovery to Smith.



Yep, way back in the second post.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Shan View Post
 

That's exactly what killed Darren Shahlavi.



(edit: specifically the Left Anterior Descending artery obstruction)



http://screenanarchy.com/2015/04/martial...-2015.html

Reply
#16
Quote:

Originally Posted by Bartleby_Scriven View Post
 


Yep, way back in the second post.



Yes, and people keep bringing up his weight, like in the post directly above mine.

Reply
#17
AIt's definitely worth repeating. Obviously your odds of your heart crapping out are significantly higher if you're carrying more weight than your body is evolved to handle, but for various reasons it's still worth getting check ups once in a while even for we Adonises.

Although I don't understand the Murican health system so maybe that's easier said than done.
Reply
#18
Quote:

Originally Posted by Bucho View Post

Although I don't understand the Murican health system so maybe that's easier said than done.


Given my experiences (collection agency coming after me before I even received a hospital bill, for example) I'll take the fatal heart attack for 1000 Alex.

Reply
#19

It can be a bit difficult to get your head around risk stratification, it took a while for me and I did a degree in it.



Basically, you can certainly modify risk up and down to a point by what you do but risk for anyone can never be zero.



Look at it this way, if you had two groups, one of fit athletes who look after their diet and exercise appropriately and one of the exact opposite, we can't say with certainty which specific individuals might go on to have a heart attack or a stroke or whatever but we can predict relative numbers much better (eg: the fit group might have 1-10 per 1000 and the unfit group 100-200 per 1000 over a period of 20 years sort of thing). Some people are going to be unlucky in the former group and (relatively) lucky in the latter.



Then when we look at the events in the fit group and examine individuals, we might find anything from an electrical conduction defect in the heart (Wolf-Parkinson-White to Long Q-T syndrome and so on), to a hypertrophic heart to any number of things that could cause a serious or even fatal event. I think in Darren Shahlavi's case, he had an undiagnosed genetic condition that put him at higher risk.



A good example would be soccer players at the top level, occasionally they have cardiac arrests on the pitch and it's found they have previously unknown heart defects. The paradox can actually be that some of these people would have been safer had they been exerting themselves less (i.e. not premier league footballers).



I mean, this happened not far away from where I was working just over the border and no-one is going to think in this case he had anything like an unhealthy lifestyle being a triathlete. For all we know, he might have been too fit.



http://www.goldcoastbulletin.com.au/life...264a987f10

Reply
#20

My wife has had breast cancer twice in the past 16 years--both times were a weird super-rare type of cancer. She was a smoker early in life, but she quit about 10-15 years ago. Her sister, who is 8 years older, has smoked and continues to smoke all her life. She has had zero health-related issues due to smoking. Genetics are weird.

Reply
#21

Hell, Jim Fixx, who helped popularize running as a fitness activity in the '70s, died of a heart attack at 52.  Of course, he'd been a smoker until he started running, and there were genetic factors as well, but you can't just look at a healthy-looking person and write off a heart attack happening.

Reply
#22

All I know is, when I'm retired and old, I'm going to get high as fuck every day. I've never taken any kind of drug, save for sharing a joint with a girlfriend in college once (it gave me a headache), so I'm hoping that recreational marijuana is legal wherever I'm living so I can just prop myself up and zone out with a nice brownie or two. I went to the ER back in the fall of last year, and they gave me 5mg of valium (which is really a nothing dose) and it fucked me up for 24 hours--I started telling my wife "Ask me anything. I'll tell you anything you want to know" and just kept blabbering on about anything and everything to the nurses until we were discharged. Then I went home and tried to stay awake, and ended up sleeping for 18 hours and then was still groggy until it finally started wearing off the next evening.

Reply
#23
Quote:

Originally Posted by Martianman View Post
 

All I know is, when I'm retired and old, I'm going to get high as fuck every day. I've never taken any kind of drug, save for sharing a joint with a girlfriend in college once (it gave me a headache), so I'm hoping that recreational marijuana is legal wherever I'm living so I can just prop myself up and zone out with a nice brownie or two. I went to the ER back in the fall of last year, and they gave me 5mg of valium (which is really a nothing dose) and it fucked me up for 24 hours--I started telling my wife "Ask me anything. I'll tell you anything you want to know" and just kept blabbering on about anything and everything to the nurses until we were discharged. Then I went home and tried to stay awake, and ended up sleeping for 18 hours and then was still groggy until it finally started wearing off the next evening.



I was laid up for three months with a slipped disc a few years ago and they prescribed a small amount of valium just to take the edge off the pain. Bloody loved it, and could completely understand why it became a housewife's choice in the 60s.

Reply
#24
Quote:

Originally Posted by jhp1608 View Post
 


I was laid up for three months with a slipped disc a few years ago and they prescribed a small amount of valium just to take the edge off the pain. Bloody loved it, and could completely understand why it became a housewife's choice in the 60s.


Yes. I totally understood why people would get addicted to these things after that. I felt great, and then I slept probably the best sleep I'd had in years.



I tried body surfing out a couple of years ago, and when I really caught my first wave (after like 2 hours) I tried and tried and tried again and never caught another one nearly as good. After that, I also said to my wife, I can see why people want to surf and do nothing else. It's a rush when you hit that wave, and then all you want is to grab that rush again and again. Luckily my personality is not that addictive. Except to chocolate chip cookies.

Reply
#25
Quote:

Originally Posted by Martianman View Post
 

My wife has had breast cancer twice in the past 16 years--both times were a weird super-rare type of cancer. She was a smoker early in life, but she quit about 10-15 years ago. Her sister, who is 8 years older, has smoked and continues to smoke all her life. She has had zero health-related issues due to smoking. Genetics are weird.



The best comparisons are actually the person versus their non-smoking self. The twin who smokes always looks older than the one who doesn't and you can always pick it. Also, a lot of people are busy crashing their physiological reserve so when the drop-off happens, it can hit with a bang sometimes (imagine a car seemingly chugging along fine right up to the moment it totally and without warning loses power in the middle lane of a freeway like we did last weekend - luckily we avoided dying this time at least).



Quote:

Originally Posted by Richard Dickson View Post
 

Hell, Jim Fixx, who helped popularize running as a fitness activity in the '70s, died of a heart attack at 52.  Of course, he'd been a smoker until he started running, and there were genetic factors as well, but you can't just look at a healthy-looking person and write off a heart attack happening.



I was thinking of Jim Fixx when this thread started. It could well be due to accumulated damage so far possibly even combined with overtraining as described above. Jim Fixx used to run a lot.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Martianman View Post
 

All I know is, when I'm retired and old, I'm going to get high as fuck every day. I've never taken any kind of drug, save for sharing a joint with a girlfriend in college once (it gave me a headache), so I'm hoping that recreational marijuana is legal wherever I'm living so I can just prop myself up and zone out with a nice brownie or two. I went to the ER back in the fall of last year, and they gave me 5mg of valium (which is really a nothing dose) and it fucked me up for 24 hours--I started telling my wife "Ask me anything. I'll tell you anything you want to know" and just kept blabbering on about anything and everything to the nurses until we were discharged. Then I went home and tried to stay awake, and ended up sleeping for 18 hours and then was still groggy until it finally started wearing off the next evening.



Depends how you give that 5mg of Valium on how spectacular the results are. Definitely not something I did at work a few weeks ago, I swear!

Reply
#26

Kevin Smith checks in:



Reply
#27

Watching a guy like Kevin Smith reveal his vulnerability is pretty shaking. My brother and I literally watched my father die, at least twice, in approx. 20 minutes. When we managed to actually to get him to a hospital the denial from him was almost unsurmountable and we were forced to over-rule him to let the expeirinced emergency staff actually take any action that was required. I can tell stories about my pop, who knew that his days were numbered years before, but chose to live the last ones of his life like a champ.  His denial of actual morality, though, was incredible.

Reply
#28

It's disturbing to me when Smith talks about essentially thinking he had a bad cold but really experiencing a heart attack.



It's even more disturbing how many serious ailments have the same symptoms as the flu.

Reply
#29
AYeah, it's almost enough to make a mofo go full hypochondriac.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)