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SciFi RECOMMENDATION or WARNING thread.
#1
One for the Sci-Fi movies!

A clunker to start: 
Isaac Asimov's Nightfall (1988)

Pretentious, nonsensical, and all the characters were irritating, I didn't make it very far in.  
Cool location for the shoot though, so that was neat.  But you could also just read the wikipedia page on Arcosanti, and have about as much fun.
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#2
Great idea for a thread!
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#3
I do like that story, but I can't see how it's more than a Twilight Zone episode. Interesting it's a Corman production, even if just his wife. I'd never heard of it, might watch out for it on the lower budget channels.

And yes, good thread idea.
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#4
I can't take credit, someone suggested it in the Horror thread.
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#5
Awesome! Now I don't have to start a brand new post-release thread to reveal that I'm the only person on the planet that enjoyed MUTE!
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#6
I am also happy this thread was created. As of late I saw Annihilation (which I thought was very good) and rewatched The Return of Godzilla (pretty good) and the poor New World Pictures version of that, Godzilla 1985. The last straight sci-fi I saw was The Black Hole, way back in late January. There's a flawed but still interesting movie where trying to be both Star Wars and 2001 doesn't always work out.
"If they made CITIZEN KANE now, it would star Danny McBride and Rosebud would be the title of his favorite spank magazine when he was a teenager. "-- engineer, talking about modern movie making

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#7
(03-09-2018, 03:32 AM)the perfect weapon Wrote: The last straight sci-fi I saw was The Black Hole, way back in late January. There's a flawed but still interesting movie where trying to be both Star Wars and 2001 doesn't always work out.

THE BLACK HOLE is very flawed, yes, but also very ambitious, especially for a Disney movie of that era.  The production design is superb, as is John Barry's score.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#8
(03-08-2018, 03:58 PM)fuzzy dunlop Wrote: Awesome! Now I don't have to start a brand new post-release thread to reveal that I'm the only person on the planet that enjoyed MUTE!

Sounds like me being the only person that likes Godzilla vs. Space Godzilla.

(03-09-2018, 03:32 AM)the perfect weapon Wrote: I am also happy this thread was created. As of late I saw Annihilation (which I thought was very good) and rewatched The Return of Godzilla (pretty good) and the poor New World Pictures version of that, Godzilla 1985. The last straight sci-fi I saw was The Black Hole, way back in late January. There's a flawed but still interesting movie where trying to be both Star Wars and 2001 doesn't always work out.

I still don't think I've ever seen the proper Return of Godzilla! Just '85. Need to track that down.

(03-09-2018, 11:54 AM)belloq87 Wrote:
(03-09-2018, 03:32 AM)the perfect weapon Wrote: The last straight sci-fi I saw was The Black Hole, way back in late January. There's a flawed but still interesting movie where trying to be both Star Wars and 2001 doesn't always work out.

THE BLACK HOLE is very flawed, yes, but also very ambitious, especially for a Disney movie of that era.  The production design is superb, as is John Barry's score.

Still love this one, and I really hope the remake is either fantastic, or doesn't happen at all.
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#9
(03-09-2018, 11:54 AM)belloq87 Wrote:
(03-09-2018, 03:32 AM)the perfect weapon Wrote: The last straight sci-fi I saw was The Black Hole, way back in late January. There's a flawed but still interesting movie where trying to be both Star Wars and 2001 doesn't always work out.

THE BLACK HOLE is very flawed, yes, but also very ambitious, especially for a Disney movie of that era.  The production design is superb, as is John Barry's score.

I'd recommend The Black Hole just to get to that absolutely batshit ending.  The preceding 90 minutes of cute robots in no way prepares you for that.
My karmic debt must be huge.

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#10
(03-09-2018, 12:25 PM)Richard Dickson Wrote:
(03-09-2018, 11:54 AM)belloq87 Wrote:
(03-09-2018, 03:32 AM)the perfect weapon Wrote: The last straight sci-fi I saw was The Black Hole, way back in late January. There's a flawed but still interesting movie where trying to be both Star Wars and 2001 doesn't always work out.

THE BLACK HOLE is very flawed, yes, but also very ambitious, especially for a Disney movie of that era.  The production design is superb, as is John Barry's score.

I'd recommend The Black Hole just to get to that absolutely batshit ending.  The preceding 90 minutes of cute robots in no way prepares you for that.

Black Hole remains a better 'trip through a black hole' movie than Interstellar.  And I don't even mind Interstellar!
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#11
The cast for The Black Hole is so great. Maximilian Schell doing his best James Mason as Captain Nemo, Tony Perkins, Borgnine, young and handsome Robert Forester, Slim Pickens as a robot!
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#12
Revisited REPO MEN last night, an underrated splatterfest with sensibilities very much in line with peak Verhoeven. Tough to make the argument that its breaking any new ground - aesthetically, its BLADE RUNNER lite, and the big action set piece is ripped straight from OLDBOY - but its all slickly directed by GAME OF THRONES vet Miguel Sapochnik (Hardhome / Battle of the Basterds). The climax is weird and gross and pretty special.
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#13
Caught a good chunk of DUNE late last night. I'm not sure if we can still consider this one underappreciated, as I feel like it has already been reappraised to death in the wake of modern sci-fi epics like JUPITER ASCENDING and VALERIAN gaining cult status*.

Seeing Lynch tackle something this big is still endlessly fascinating, and so many of the creative decisions that leave me scratching my head (all that voiceover!) make for a very singular, very weird cinematic experience.

*certainly up for debate
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#14
Annihilation is well worth your time if you haven't watched it yet.

And I've been watching Killjoys sporadically on Netflix and it's a surprisingly decent little sci-fi show. Nothing mindblowing but I have fun with it.
"I mean don't get me wrong fucking the wolf man is impressive but ugh." - Waaaaaaaalt
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#15
I only recently got around to ANNIHILATION, too, and I also agree that it's quality stuff. Big sci-fi ideas, but it still functions as a narrative.

It's also got some truly horrific stuff to satisfy horror fans, too.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#16
I still need to see ANNIHILATION.

Watched BEYOND THE TIME BARRIER (1960), mistaking if for another time-travel movie, WORLD WITHOUT END (1956).

TIME BARRIER is interesting for some of the sets and locations, but I found it depressing and dull on the whole, and seems at least an hour longer than it's 75 minute run time.  
There are some impressive crowd scenes and other footage that had to be lifted from somewhere else.  Turns out it they were taken from a Fritz Lang movie!  So now I need to track down The Indian Tomb AKA, Journey to the Lost City.
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#17
News story about a kid getting caught in the LA sewer system meant I needed to watch THEM! (1954) again.

Hadn't seen it in a while and it still holds up. Even if the ant puppets are fairly static. Three, count 'em, three Wilhelm screams!

Aliens really is a remake.
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#18
Them! is so good, the first and third acts really hold up very well. It's probably the best (western) atom-age giant monster movie... what would you guys consider the top 5? For me, it's probably:

1. Godzilla, cause I mean, come on
2. Them!
3. The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, technically not an atomic monster but still rooted in atomic fears. Like Them, the first and third acts are the best parts - I feel like a lot of these movies drag a bit in the middle - but there's greatness throughout.
4. Tarantula... iit probably helps that I'm arachnophobic but I think the effects actually work really well and this one remains pretty thrilling throughout
5. This is a tough call, there are plenty of others I enjoy but I don't think any are as good as the top 4. Maybe Rodan? It kinda peaks with the reveal of the monster but leading up to that is really strong and you still get classic Tsuburaya effects bonanza and a pretty effective jet fighter scene after that.

Also it's sort of the inverse of the above but The Incredible Shrinking Man is maybe the outright best *film* of the era next to Godzilla.

Lastly, I just want to note that I love both Dune and The Black Hole. I'm aware of the flaws but both films work pretty unequivocally for me.
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#19
(04-10-2018, 06:59 PM)dan benenson Wrote: Them! is so good, the first and third acts really hold up very well. It's probably the best (western) atom-age giant monster movie... what would you guys consider the top 5? For me, it's probably:

1. Godzilla, cause I mean, come on
2. Them!
3. The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, technically not an atomic monster but still rooted in atomic fears. Like Them, the first and third acts are the best parts - I feel like a lot of these movies drag a bit in the middle - but there's greatness throughout.
4. Tarantula... iit probably helps that I'm arachnophobic but I think the effects actually work really well and this one remains pretty thrilling throughout
5. This is a tough call, there are plenty of others I enjoy but I don't think any are as good as the top 4. Maybe Rodan? It kinda peaks with the reveal of the monster but leading up to that is really strong and you still get classic Tsuburaya effects bonanza and a pretty effective jet fighter scene after that.

I'm also a fan of 1959's THE GIANT BEHEMOTH, which is basically a companion piece to THE BEAST FROM 20,000 FATHOMS, and which features fine stop motion effects from the great Willis O'Brien.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#20
From the same director as Gorgo, which is also great. I loved TGB when I was a kid (i obsessively tracked down every monster movie on basic cable, luckily TNT and TBS were consistent sources for a while, with Monstervision and regular sci-fi movie marathons), though in my memory it's one of the ones with some dull, drab stretches. You're absolutely right about the effects though. The stop motion in that and Beast holds up way better than some stuff from that era like, I dunno, The Giant Claw (which I also enjoyed back then but is quite silly now).
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#21
THE GIANT CLAW is so wonderfully absurd.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#22
(03-09-2018, 11:54 AM)Belloq87 Wrote: THE BLACK HOLE is very flawed, yes, but also very ambitious, especially for a Disney movie of that era.  The production design is superb, as is John Barry's score.

Yes that is true; I enjoyed how the movie looked and its score.

(03-09-2018, 12:23 PM)mrbananagrabber Wrote: Still love this one, and I really hope the remake is either fantastic, or doesn't happen at all.

Thankfully The Return of Godzilla was released on Blu back in '16 and can be had for only 10 bucks on Amazon. Godzilla 1985 is a stupid version of Return and those scenes shot by New World specifically for the movie are SO bad. Yet, somehow there are widescreen prints of it that can easily be found online if anyone hadn't seen it since they were a kid and they want to stream it for free so they can realize it is not so good.

(03-09-2018, 12:25 PM)Richard Dickson Wrote: I'd recommend The Black Hole just to get to that absolutely batshit ending.  The preceding 90 minutes of cute robots in no way prepares you for that.

Yes that was definitely unexpected.

(03-12-2018, 01:10 PM)mrbananagrabber Wrote: Black Hole remains a better 'trip through a black hole' movie than Interstellar.  And I don't even mind Interstellar!

Haha. Personally I don't love Nolan movies (to put it mildly) so I'd rather watch The Black Hole again rather than Interstellar a second time, and the latter being almost twice as long isn't even one of the reasons why.

(03-12-2018, 01:31 PM)atomtastic Wrote: The cast for The Black Hole is so great. Maximilian Schell doing his best James Mason as Captain Nemo, Tony Perkins, Borgnine, young and handsome Robert Forester, Slim Pickens as a robot!

I also liked the cast, including the random decision to have Pickens voice an older robot.

I've neglected this thread in the past month, mainly because until this week I hadn't really watched any sci-fi. But I now have two wildly different films to talk about.

The first one I've actually seen twice now, because I am a dumbass: The Adventures of Pluto Nash. While I am sure that things like Norbit or Imagine That or A Thousand Words are worse, this was still pretty bad. A great cast is in an utterly forgettable mess of a picture. The effects look chintzy yet the actual world on the moon is nice in terms of production design and how there are plenty of nods to better genre pictures, although they'll make you want to shut off the film and watch those again instead.

Just tonight I watched for the first time Brainstorm. Given what happened during production, I am not surprised the movie is real uneven and at times loses its way. Yet it was interesting enough and some of the images you see are tremendous, so I can say this is fine overall. Such things as the changing aspect ratio and how Louise Fletcher smoked in almost all the scenes she was in entertained me, for entirely different reasons. I liked the James Horner score also.
"If they made CITIZEN KANE now, it would star Danny McBride and Rosebud would be the title of his favorite spank magazine when he was a teenager. "-- engineer, talking about modern movie making

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#23
This your regular reminder that The Expanse is the best damn sci-fi show on right now that you are NOT WATCHING.

So get on that. You won't regret it.
"I mean don't get me wrong fucking the wolf man is impressive but ugh." - Waaaaaaaalt
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#24
You'll like the books as well. Be prepared for the Multi POV chapters though.
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#25
(04-13-2018, 03:18 AM)Codename Wrote: This your regular reminder that The Expanse is the best damn sci-fi show on right now that you are NOT WATCHING.

So get on that. You won't regret it.

I'm watching it... on Amazon PRIIIIIIIIMMMMMMMMMMMEEEEEEEEEEEEE
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#26
I really need to give the Expanse another go. I keep trying the first episode and it just doesn't connect.
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#27
Expanse is very much worth a watch. The first season gets just a bit choppy, but the second season is aces. Really enjoying the current, third season as well, airing now.
If you're happy, you're not paying attention.

Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny: 
Glad that you guys worked that out amongst yourselves.

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#28
Tonight I saw another sci-fi film and it was one I had seen before. Unfortunately it was Battlefield Earth. Yes, it's still as awful as you've heard or perhaps remember watching from the past. All of it is atrocious, from the plot to the characters, from the effects to how everything is desaturated. I highly doubt I'll ever watch this ever again, at least. If anyone wants to have a painful two hours, it is now on Netflix Instant.
"If they made CITIZEN KANE now, it would star Danny McBride and Rosebud would be the title of his favorite spank magazine when he was a teenager. "-- engineer, talking about modern movie making

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#29
I remember seeing BATTLEFIELD EARTH on opening night and not being able to believe how awful it was.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#30
Battlefield Earth was one of the funniest theatrical experiences my friends and I ever had, I vividly remember we were sitting in the row with all the floor space in front of it for people to walk through and near the end of the movie I was laughing so hard at something I actually fell out of my chair and rolled on the floor. Battlefield Earth literally made me ROFL.
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#31
This was interesting. There's a strong First Player Shooter aspect. Especially helps if you can freeze frame it at home. Some hidden details.


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#32
The FPS vibe is on point. Feels very Half Life 2 in tone. Will give it a look at least.

ETA, give/bring back the Expanse a chance.
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#33
Here's another Sci Fi flick that got a theatrical release here in Singapore.


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#34
(05-03-2018, 11:42 AM)Belloq87 Wrote: I remember seeing BATTLEFIELD EARTH on opening night and not being able to believe how awful it was.

(05-03-2018, 05:02 PM)dan benenson Wrote: Battlefield Earth was one of the funniest theatrical experiences my friends and I ever had, I vividly remember we were sitting in the row with all the floor space in front of it for people to walk through and near the end of the movie I was laughing so hard at something I actually fell out of my chair and rolled on the floor. Battlefield Earth literally made me ROFL.

I never saw it theatrically, although if I had that would have been quite the experience, whether or not I literally ROFL or saw someone else do so.

I saw a pair of relevant movies the past few days. Thursday night was Solo: A Star Wars Story. The films outside the prequels and the Holiday Special I love (partially due to nostalgia) although The Last Jedi isn't good, but I don't mean to start a huge argument about that in this thread. Solo I enjoyed more than that; it was still "meh" to me. While there were fun moments, it seemed pointless and what a forgettable villain. Tonight I watched Interstellar again. I wasn't a fan the first time, although seeing it at a science museum at a now-closed IMAX dome where it was a 70mm IMAX projection was pretty cool. I am also "meh" about it. Nolan's films typically leave me cold and it was the case here even if he tried to be a humanist for once and use sentimentality. There are quality scenes yet plenty of dumb ones also. A shame as I should have enjoyed an epic story like that.
"If they made CITIZEN KANE now, it would star Danny McBride and Rosebud would be the title of his favorite spank magazine when he was a teenager. "-- engineer, talking about modern movie making

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#35
(05-27-2018, 04:01 AM)The Perfect Weapon Wrote: Tonight I watched Interstellar again. I wasn't a fan the first time, although seeing it at a science museum at a now-closed IMAX dome where it was a 70mm IMAX projection was pretty cool. I am also "meh" about it. Nolan's films typically leave me cold and it was the case here even if he tried to be a humanist for once and use sentimentality. There are quality scenes yet plenty of dumb ones also. A shame as I should have enjoyed an epic story like that.

I'm a gigantic Nolan fan, but INTERSTELLAR also leaves me a bit cold. I certainly like the movie, and admire many of its elements (Hans Zimmer's score is one of his absolute best), but it just never fully connects.

I do think the scene where McConaughey leaves his daughter is arguably the most emotionally potent in any Nolan film. The rest of the movie, unfortunately, can't really pay that scene off.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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