Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
The Ritual
#1
I really dug this one. Might be fun to get a chat going on it.
Reply
#2
A few of us discussed it in the Horror Recommendations And Warnings Thread, and the general opinion is that it's pretty damned good.

"If I can shoot rabbits, then I can shoot fascists" -  The Manic Street Preachers

Steam ID: iammrsaxon / Blizzard ID: MrSaxon#2283 / Xbox ID: MR SAX0N
Reply
#3
It’s the next movie I plan on watching.

I’ll post some thoughts here Tuesday night.

Reply
#4
Yeah. Enjoyed this one a lot too. The bare bones of the story are derivative of a few other films but it's got some serious atmosphere and the monster design is the coolest I've seen in years. Just fucking amazing.
I might have been born yesterday sir, but I stayed up all night!
Reply
#5
I liked this film a lot. I think I could have loved it if it had someone other than Spall as the lead. Severe case of Matt Walsh Comedy Face that prevents the dramatic scenes from landing as hard as they should. And that makes me lol at scenes that probably were not intended to be funny e.g. the withered old crone gives Luke stink eye, Luke gives her a hard slap, she flies out of the frame, he moves on nonchalantly.
Reply
#6
I worship Rafe Spall.
Reply
#7
I first saw him in Pete vs. Life, a British cringe-comedy series. I still quote "It was a shit!" when I can get away with it.

I'll submit this is the best thing I've seen him in.
Reply
#8
Black mirror.
Reply
#9
He's fantastic in Black Mirror and The Big Short.
I might have been born yesterday sir, but I stayed up all night!
Reply
#10
He's great here but 2011's The Shadow Line is the best thing that Ralph Spall has been in. Written by Hugo Black (who would go on to write the fantastic An Honorable Woman) , starring Chiwetel Ejiofor in the lead role, it's an eight part BBC mini-series on Amazon Prime and worth your time if you've never seen it.

"If I can shoot rabbits, then I can shoot fascists" -  The Manic Street Preachers

Steam ID: iammrsaxon / Blizzard ID: MrSaxon#2283 / Xbox ID: MR SAX0N
Reply
#11
This was very good. Went places I wasn't expecting and avoided a lot of horror tropes. When those did pop up, the cast was charismatic enough for me to overlook them. The convenience store's steady devolution into primordial nature was a nice touch.

Near to end, I was wondering if I was watching Bloodbourne: The Movie.
Reply
#12
I dug The Ritual when I saw it last month. Solid slow burn that felt more Silent Hill than anything else. To me at least. Rafe Spall is a good actor too. First noticed him in Shaun Of The Dead as one of Shaun's co-workers.
Shake: I bring you news you give me grief. You know they all think you're dead.

The Punisher: They'll kill each other now.

 
Reply
#13
I've mixed feelings on this. I love monster movies, and kinda like just-thriller movies. You can't tell someone this is a monster movie (which could make/break them watching it at all) without giving away the gimmick/eventual turn the film makes. I wouldn't have bothered with another 'strangers being preyed on by hill folk' movie, but a friend hipped me that I'd like it by telling me there was something 'monstrous' in the climax. I felt there should have been a closer/better look at the creature at the end. We did see something in the doorway earlier on but couldn't make out anything or make sense of what we saw. But to me, a back-lit by flames from several hundred feet away view at the climax wasn't a proper payoff.
'Ask Klingon or Krell, my posts are swell'
Reply
#14
You'd have hated the book, Steve. If I remember correctly, it leaves you wondering if there's even a monster until the last few chapters and, even then, you're given only the briefest description of it. It's one of the reasons I really like this adaptation. I think it has a much stronger ending than the novel it's based on.

"If I can shoot rabbits, then I can shoot fascists" -  The Manic Street Preachers

Steam ID: iammrsaxon / Blizzard ID: MrSaxon#2283 / Xbox ID: MR SAX0N
Reply
#15
I really enjoyed this.

First of all it was beautifully shot. I'm a big fan of lost in the woods types of movies, and Bruckner did a great job of filming the forest in a way that there is a sense of geography. It definitely looks like the cast is traveling through the woods and the whole thing isn't just being shot in wood particular spot.

The set design was also fantastic. That initial cabin they find themselves taken shelter in was just wild.

Luke's dreams blending more and more with reality were incredibly filmed.

I really dug the design of the jotun. Blending two human bodies and using arms as mandibles was something I've never seen before. I really loved the shot of it galloping behind the grocery store racks.

And there was more than enough to scare/creep me out during this one. The friends all waking up in the cabin after spending the night was bonkers. But my favourite part of the movie was when Luke hears the chanting/moaning coming from behind the door and when he opens it, it goes silent. Only to find a congregation worshipping... something. And the slow realization that maybe this is what the long life is that Loki grants them in exchange for worship.

Reply
#16
I liked this okay.

The first act is effectively unsettling. You could tell it was going to be very much a Descent-ish flick with dudes, and man does it have the tropes to go with that, just slightly better writing and acting and presentation/production value than you'd see in your average by-the-numbers horror flick. I thought Spall was pretty good, though I am not sure his character is much of anything other than a sad backstory and a lot of reacting.

I was feeling the movie up through that first hut they enter. The story felt really been-there-done-that but the atmosphere was working for me.

The second act of the movie--I mean, I'm almost surprised this was based on a book that apparently people thought worth turning into a film. Makes me curious about the book, honestly, because in the middle of the movie there's just not much going on that's interesting or compelling and some of it is pretty contrived (the inter-group conflict is just really predictable and kind of a bore). It also felt like the film's rhythms kind of get off and it fails to keep building up that dread that it was able to start seeding at the beginning. So, for me, this is where the movie really loses momentum. It's never really scary for the rest of the movie, and I think a lot of it has to do with the tension just sort of being released as the group bumbles about the woods and argues. I also think the character of Phil is something the movie wanted to do more with, and maybe more was done with in the book, but here it's just like, "okay, and that's enough of that arc!"

The Village, uh, I mean the village people that show up are SUCH a trope and plot device, it was a huge eye-roll moment for me. The film uses them to deliver the story of the creature, which is interesting if also vague and I guess we're just supposed to accept that the Norse gods are real in some fashion, and a better movie/story would have found a way to flesh out this section of the movie more. It's called "The Ritual" and yet the rituals of what's going on here are really de-emphasized. I feel like we're given some of the details of the ritual (the runes, bodies in the trees, fear-preying hallucinations, the zombie-skeletons in the attic) but none of the connective tissue. And I enjoy ambiguity and films that don't try to explain everything, but I don't know, in this case it felt like loosely related images that ended up having little purpose behind them other than to be, I dunno, evocative?

All of that said, the creature design was DOPE. Kind of worth the wait, honestly (well, and it's a short movie). The movie really shone in this section once the creature was finally revealed, even if the action happening on the screen is dubious at best. But yeah, that creature is the shit. Design was great, visual effects were surprisingly good, I almost forgot I was watching a direct-to-Flix feature in that final section, especially with that shot back-lit by the burning house. Some cool imagery there.

The climax felt like a pretty forced way to find a point for the backstory, and the denouement is one of those half-minute things where the movie just sorta ends (again, like The Descent, and I guess a fair number of other horror movies), but I can't say I hated the time I spent watching this, as it was short, mildly effective in spurts, and gots an ill monster.
the empire never ended
Reply
#17
(03-14-2018, 12:43 PM)catartik Wrote: I really dug the design of the jotun.  Blending two human bodies and using arms as mandibles was something I've never seen before.  I really loved the shot of it galloping behind the grocery store racks.

Those jawa eyes were killing me. I know that it is just lights under a hood, but the thing gave off some real menace in certain parts of the movie just by glaring at you.
"You want a vision of the future?Imagine a boot stomping on a human face.....forever."
Reply
#18
(03-14-2018, 12:35 PM)MrSaxon Wrote: You'd have hated the book, Steve. If I remember correctly, it leaves you wondering if there's even a monster until the last few chapters and, even then, you're given only the briefest description of it. It's one of the reasons I really like this adaptation. I think it has a much stronger ending than the novel it's based on.

Good to know. I really liked the book, but it was startlingly ambiguous. Might give this a shot tonight.
Reply
#19
Spoilery-ish kind of thing

Were those Jawa eyes in the torso head's junk?
Reply
#20
Yeah that was good. GREAT creature design.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)