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THE TERROR on AMC
I didn't understand the request for folks but then, in that final scene, I thought "Ah!"

"If I can shoot rabbits, then I can shoot fascists" -  The Manic Street Preachers

Steam ID: iammrsaxon / Blizzard ID: MrSaxon#2283 / Xbox ID: MR SAX0N
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(05-15-2018, 02:44 AM)Fafhrd Wrote: Going out on Blanky's grin and laugh is such a fantastic cut to credits.

That was a great moment to go out on. Ian Hart's been doing some really fine work on this show.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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If the final ends with them eating Captain Jared Harris*, I'll be EXTREMELY pissed off.

* I've really enjoyed watching his character evolve into a true, compassionate leader.

"If I can shoot rabbits, then I can shoot fascists" -  The Manic Street Preachers

Steam ID: iammrsaxon / Blizzard ID: MrSaxon#2283 / Xbox ID: MR SAX0N
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Harris has really been excellent. For the whole series, but particularly these last couple episodes. His scenes with Menzies and Hart have exuded such a deep warmth and humanity, which makes the stark predicament have all the more impact.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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God the development of Harris and Menzies’ characters and their relationship is so damn good, as are their performances. There are lots of great things about the show but I think them and Goodsir are what really put it over the top for me.
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“We were not meant to know of it.”

Such a chillingly simple encapsulation of this whole thing.

That was an eminently appropriate finale for this wonderfully stark show. Ultimately I think they did a good job of streamlining the plotting of the novel’s second half (there is even more stuff dealing with factions going this way and that in the book), and in making the conflict more directly focused on Hickey and Crozier, providing a bit more of a climax to their relationship than exists in the source.

As with the book, I didn’t fully buy Goodsir’s decision, but it certainly did play better than on the page.

All in all, I'm impressed. And what a haunting final image to go out on.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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Loved it. Man, what I would give to have this same crew and cast adapt At the mountains of Madness
"Dictatorships foster oppression, dictatorships foster servitude, dictatorships foster cruelty; more abominable is the fact that they foster idiocy."

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(05-21-2018, 10:49 PM)ryoken Wrote: Loved it. Man, what I would give to have this same crew and cast adapt At the mountains of Madness

I'd certainly watch that.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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Hickey's fate was nearly as cathartic as Mrs. Carmody catching a couple of bullets in The Mist.
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I was very, very happy at "Hickey"'s fate (and did we ever learn his real name?). I'm sure the actor is a perfect lovely person in RL but holy shit that fucking smirk needed to be wiped off the earth.

I didn't like the ending. Even less satisfying than the source's. I'd have to watch the series again - something I will NOT be doing - but it felt unearned and really arbitrary. Why would Crozier turn his back on rescue and returning to the world he knew? (Other than a nod to historical fidelity.)

As anticlimactic as the book's ending was, I liked this even less.

My overall opinion remains the same: excellent production values. Solid, solid performances. And entirely too long. This should have been six episodes. MAYBE eight. But we had entirely too much time with nothing of consequence happening. I understand the desire to communicate the desolation, isolation, and sense of futility. But enough already.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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(05-22-2018, 09:22 AM)MichaelM Wrote: I didn't like the ending. Even less satisfying than the source's. I'd have to watch the series again - something I will NOT be doing - but it felt unearned and really arbitrary. Why would Crozier turn his back on rescue and returning to the world he knew? (Other than a nod to historical fidelity.)

As anticlimactic as the book's ending was, I liked this even less.

Interesting. I found the ending of the series more satisfying to me than the novel's! Maybe some of that was just built-in, leftover goodwill for Harris performance, and I would have been on board with whatever they did with him.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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Keep in mind that I've been low key dissatisfied with the show all along, so my MEH-ing the ending is in line with that.

Again, the production values and performances of this show are top notch. I just found the show too long, too bleak, and too overall joyless.


BTW, for those who really liked the show, the AV Club has been doing a really good job reviewing/discussing the episodes. I recommend checking it out.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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They seemed to ramp up the surreal flourishes in this last episode. A couple of weird hallucinatory bits, and the droning score over the ending felt really bizarre (but also correct). The image of Goodsir's body tied up and diced on the table really fucked me up. I thought this was a strong, weird finale.

Now that I can digest the show as a whole, I'm not sure I would want to scale any of it back. It does become something of a miserable slog, but in a good way; as in, surely this is the desired effect. The story takes place over several years; the descent into dread, depravity and madness is gradual, and boy do we feel the slide. I can't imagine binge-ing this show; I bet it would be exhausting.
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The brief moment where Lady Silence sees Goodsir was beautifully sad in an understated way.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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(05-22-2018, 10:38 AM)fuzzy dunlop Wrote: They seemed to ramp up the surreal flourishes in this last episode.  A couple of weird hallucinatory bits, and the droning score over the ending felt really bizarre (but also correct).  The image of Goodsir's body tied up and diced on the table really fucked me up.  I thought this was a strong, weird finale.  

Now that I can digest the show as a whole, I'm not sure I would want to scale any of it back.  It does become something of a miserable slog, but in a good way; as in, surely this is the desired effect.  The story takes place over several years; the descent into dread, depravity and madness is gradual, and boy do we feel the slide.  I can't imagine binge-ing this show; I bet it would be exhausting.

Goodsir's end was so heartbreaking and devastating. And yeah, the sight of his body, carved up for eating, was wrenching.

I fully understand that it's a (valid) artistic choice to drag the story out, and the (assumed) reasons behind it. For me, it's just too much. I think we could've had a similar impact without quite so many virtually empty or atmospheric scenes with blowing wind and sere vistas.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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I don't think taking issue with the length of the series is an unfair critique. The number of episodes didn't bother me, but I get why it might have seemed to be too much for others.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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I got through episode 6, and thought the performances and production design were aces, but had the same problem as Michael with it feeling drug out. I get why they did that (beyond business reasons), as it puts the audience in a similar position to the sailors, but it was also the reason I fell out of the show. I will probably go back and finish it, but I think it probably was a story that could have been told with a bit more concision while still having a similar impact.
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I would say definitely give the final episodes a chance. I think they would play better for you if you knock them out in relatively quick succession.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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I expect that to probably be the case, which is why I fell-off week to week viewing.

Whatever problems I may have with the series, though, Jared Harris is excellent. Not that that is really a surprise at this point from him, but it deserves to be repeated.
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Skip episode 7 and go right to 8. IMNSHO, Episode 8 is the best of the season.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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I agree that 8 was the best of the season. The last, say, 15 minutes of that one are excellent television.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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I don't want to be spoilery here, but that last image of the last episode.

Is that him deciding that he was giving up on his former life and becoming one of the natives?

Was that him freezing to death?

I'm a dunce and I don't think I got what they were going for there.
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Surely the former, though the incredible stillness of the image obviously suggests a metaphorical "death" in that cold, barren nothing.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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Heard great things about this from the beginning but deliberately held off buying my Amazon pass until the finale aired so I would have the option of barreling through. First episode was terrific, love the atmosphere.
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Reminded me a little of Benchley's Jaws there for a second.
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(05-22-2018, 05:23 PM)electrichead Wrote: I don't want to be spoilery here, but that last image of the last episode.

Is that him deciding that he was giving up on his former life and becoming one of the natives?

Was that him freezing to death?

I'm a dunce and I don't think I got what they were going for there.

He's seal hunting. And there was a line of dialogue a few episodes back about how it takes an Inuit five years to learn how to hunt seal, so it's definitely showing him as having gone fully native.

I also totally buy his decision to stay, and I think it's largely informed by what the chief(?) tells him about how Lady Silence has to go into exile. Crozier lost his ships and his crew and he killed the Tuunbaq. He has to be exiled from his own people for the former, and he has to help the Netsilik to try and pay back the latter.
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Magnificent, bleak ending. Definitely prefer it to the book, although I did like that too.

Crozier wasn't dead, he was seal hunting. I understand his reasons for staying. Ge didn't find the passage, he lost the ships and his crew. It was years later and he was already escaping anyway after being rejected by Franklin's neice three times.

Adam Nagaitis (Hickey) is on all episodes of 'the minds behind The Terror' podcast, along with the writer and Dan Simmons, who loved the show overall.
"I don't do tag-teams with blood relatives". Kenny Powers.
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I know the chain had everything to do with it, but I can't help but feel the Tuunbaq choked on Hickey's soul.
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Late to this "party", but holy crap is this my sort of thing so far.  The music is pretty sensational too, very abstract.
Interesting to read people found it too long.  I'll see how that plays out.  I'm already mildly annoyed they just skipped the first winter.  Yeah, I'm that sort of survival nerd.  
I'll read the rest properly later.

I was interested in this though.

(04-06-2018, 10:57 AM)schwartz Wrote: They are hoping to make it an anthology, based on an interview I heard with the writers.  I have no idea what that means for the second season, but I could do with some more historical horror, I guess.  It's an underserved niche.

(04-06-2018, 11:03 AM)Belloq87 Wrote: Doing an anthology about unexplained/unsolved historical weirdness could be fertile ground if they can find another real event as mysterious and compelling as the Franklin Expedition.

Roanoke and the Dyatlov Pass Incident feel like they'd have potential, but they've also been well-covered by this point.

A whole series of grim doom!  I for one can't wait.  Something may be wrong with me.
I've got one.  The Batavia.  People have floated (har) ideas to make a movie or two about this before, but it never got off the ground ( so far).  A series like this would be good for that.  Basically people get shipwrecked on crappy sand islands in the middle of fucking nowhere, go quite mad, divide into groups and wage holy war on one another.
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(05-23-2018, 05:18 PM)muzman Wrote: A whole series of grim doom!  I for one can't wait.  Something may be wrong with me.
I've got one.  The Batavia.  People have floated (har) ideas to make a movie or two about this before, but it never got off the ground ( so far).  A series like this would be good for that.  Basically people get shipwrecked on crappy sand islands in the middle of fucking nowhere, go quite mad, divide into groups and wage holy war on one another.

Never heard of this incident, but it definitely would have potential.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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Just watched the finale and I thought it was incredible. Completely bought Crozier's decision to stay "dead" and just live out his days in exile with the natives. That final shot will haunt me for a while. Kept expecting him to spear a fish or a seal as the final shot and LOVED that they didn't do it. So satisfying.
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I'd really like those who haven't read the book to look up the original ending and compare it to the show's.

Having sat with it for a while, I prefer the show's ending, but I still don't think Crozier's decision to stay "dead" and live out the remainder of his life with the natives was properly foreshadowed or earned.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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That's something I would have expected from Goodsir.
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Completely agreed. In fact, for a long while, I thought the show might swap Crozier and Goodsir with respect to how they end the story.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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Having reached the conclusion my one complaint about the show is that the supernatural/monster elements are in a slightly frustrating middle ground where I wish they’d either leaned into it more for full blown otherworldly horror or kept it to a bare minimum with only slight hints and left everything else to your imagination - or even left it out entirely and have a regular polar bear stalking them with maybe an allusion or two to what it represents to the natives and leave it at that. Of course some of this has to do with the design, which I never grew to like (also gotta day the more often and clearly we see it the more underwhelming the effects were to me. Perhaps more practical effects mixed in would have given it a more palpable feeling of menace and danger, but maybe that wasn’t viable).

Having said that, everything else about the show is great and I really really liked it overall. Really satisfying ending, appropriately bleak and tragic but at least with a glimmer of peace at the very end.

Crozier is definitely not dead in the last shot. I think of the line from a little before that, “remember where you are, and accept it.” He lives because he ultimately accepts reality of this place, that it was folly for these men to come and try to conquer it and bring a completely different way of life to it. The final scenes show him accepting this, warning others not to make the same mistake, and basically disappearing into this place that is too powerful to bend to the will of man.

I also thought Goodsir’s tragic end was fitting the character, because he had a goodness and pureness befitting his name that was bound to eventually break him in the face of all the harshness and horror. Although Crozier did become a man who would be willing to sacrifice himself for others he strikes me as someone who wouldn’t do it if there was still any chance he help them as a leader and a friend. At the point in the story where that self-sacrifice occurs he still believes he can get back to his men and lead them to safety. So, also fundamentally a good man but in a slightly different way, and also a little more hardened.
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