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THE TERROR on AMC
I always meant to get around to season 1 and never did.  It seemed like people were hyped, hyped, hyped . . . and then when the finale aired it went dead silent.  Seemed like a bad sign.

But I was fascinated to see this season because it's something the US - at least to outside eyes - has never really addressed or discussed before and seemed more than happy to just act like it never happened.
Loving the show so far.  The not-THAT-slow burn works for me.
Not a hard man to track. Leaves dead men wherever he goes.
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Interesting that both this and THE RIGHTEOUS GEMSTONES had backstory episodes this week.  Yuko's personal afterlife played like a terrific, self-contained horror tale.

By no small margin, this was the best episode of the season to date, but of course so much about the first five episodes was setting up for this.  It is interesting, though, to have so many weeks characterized by a slow-moving sense of mystery now punctuated with an absolutely cram-packed episode that's suddenly generous with explanations.  

In fact, I kind of wonder what remains that's going to take four more episodes to address.  Regardless, the show has shifted gears and I am excited about whatever its endgame is.
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My best guess is that Luz will be driven to a similar form of madness and suicide by the loss of her child(ren), and become the new avenging spirit. The idea of this curse flowing from Japanese- to Mexican-Americans would provide some connection from the WWII internment to the atrocities being committed on our border right now.

Or maybe Yuko will just come back from the, back from the, dead.
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It ended up being a lot more sentimental than that!

Maybe some day people will come to find out how good a season of television this was.  Ratings were bad, so I wonder if AMC sees a future for this presumably expensive show.  An anthology series does have the advantage of being a reboot every time out, so we will see.  This is a strong brand and there is no limit to the historical situations you can supernaturally elaborate upon.
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Maybe someday.

Maybe.

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That was a good season. I thought throughout, though, that this could totally work as a straightforward period drama without the supernatural stuff. There's enough terror in the events themselves even without murderous revenants.
Git' in under mah belly!
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Finally wrapped this up last night and really enjoyed it. A very different approach to "terror", and maybe that's why it didn't get much traction with the general audience - not enough jump-scares and the usual things associated with the word? I don't know, and I can't speak for other people, of course. But I really enjoyed the small, personal story set against the backdrop of a huge historical event. I think fatherdude nailed the resolution in one word with "sentimental", and I agree 100% with cd-u in that it would work well as a period drama (exploring what happened after they left the camps would have been fascinating and heartbreaking, but I guess it wasn't a major part of THIS story), although going back to what I said up-thread I'm surprised this even happened at all considering the USA's seeming willingness to sweep the whole shitty affair under the rug and never speak of it.
Not a hard man to track. Leaves dead men wherever he goes.
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Personally, my issue was the opposite; the ghost story and jump scares felt largely tacked on, and it felt like there was not enough time and focus devoted to the very real, very effective horror of the internment camp. That was the central pitch of the season, but it felt like only about a quarter of the story actually took place there.
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(10-23-2019, 05:20 PM)schwartz Wrote: Personally, my issue was the opposite; the ghost story and jump scares felt largely tacked on, and it felt like there was not enough time and focus devoted to the very real, very effective horror of the internment camp.  That was the central pitch of the season, but it felt like only about a quarter of the story actually took place there.

I never saw any of the trailers or anything - just heard that it revolved around a vengeful spirit and the internment camps - so I didn't have a particular angle in mind when I went in, so maybe that's one of the reasons why we diverge on that one.  But again, agreed that I'd love to see a period drama just about the actual camps themselves - that shit was horrible enough on it's own.
But it's also a strong discussion point to bring up when trying to talk to folks about how people are people, no matter where they're from.  The Japanese-Americans are - rightfully so! - the sympathetic victims of the US Internment Camp story.  But on the other side of the world in Japan-occupied Korea at the exact same time, the Japanese Army was committing some of the most heinously atrocious acts in the nation's history with the Comfort Women situation.  And that's something that THEIR country is all too happy to sweep under the rug and to this day continue to deny it actually happened.
So . . . yeah.  Swings and roundabouts, I guess.  We all suck.
Not a hard man to track. Leaves dead men wherever he goes.
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Yes, the internment camp element was definitely more backdrop than it was the cardinal point.  I'd have plenty of interest in AMERICAN CRIME STORY: INFAMY myself, but I don't want to knock too hard on a good revenant story for failing to be something it wasn't trying to.  My objections to the season stem largely from its undisciplined portion control in the schmaltz department, but overall I was quite pleased with it, and it's sad to see it overlooked.  That sixth episode was cash money.
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