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Music Critic/ Criticism Catch-All
#71
Jordan Hoffman:


"I am unable to eulogize Neil Peart in an official context today, but if you want to bathe in his music & think about his songs, here is the deep dive full ranking (with drum solo sidebars) for Thrillist that went up recently. All my feelings are in there."

https://www.thrillist.com/entertainment/...ngs-ranked

"Forty-five years ago, a mighty rock triumvirate roared in from the north, armed with furious grooves, instrumental complexity, crafty lyrics, and an important question to ask of the legions of fans they'd win over: Do you want to air-guitar, air-bass or air-drum right now?

On August 14, 1974, when singer-bassist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer-lyricist Neil Peart -- brought in just three weeks earlier to replace ailing founding member John Rutsey -- performed live together for the first time at Pittsburgh's Civic Auditorium in support of Uriah Heep and Manfred Mann, few attendees could have predicted that Rush had embarked on an inimitable four-decade journey. But within a few years, as the Canadian power trio set aside its Led Zeppelin and Cream fixation, it became clear that Rush had discovered an addictive formula: Geddy Lee, the frontman with vocals that soared high like an eagle on poppers and in-your-face bass that rode low; Alex Lifeson, purveyor of searing, shearing guitar, zipping up and down scales one moment and glistening simple soundscapes the next; and Neil Peart, one of the busiest drummers in rockdom, packing each fill with as much vigor as a simple measure could handle.

The band's unparalleled musical intricacy is often framed with a mathematician's logic. Sonically, there isn't that much philosophical difference between Rush and Iron Maiden but, back in the day, their fan bases couldn't have been farther apart. Rush's records appealed to freaks and burnouts, sure, but also to eggheads and early computer programmers. Peart's lyrics had a lot to do with that. They were often epic in scope (multiple concept albums! a song that stretches out over two albums!), rich in sci-fi and fantasy adventure, and contained clever couplets that rallied around a particular heavy theme. Circling tricky subjects like individualism, freedom, and triumph, the songs still retain a brightness that was often reflected in the musical structure. (Note: There's also a subset of Rush fans who love the music but abhor the words. They're wrong, but why argue?)

Rush fans are among the most dedicated in rock. How many pets out there have been named By-Tor? How many people struggled through Atlas Shrugged based on the band's implicit recommendation? How many kids played Space Invaders to "Tom Sawyer," or was that just on Futurama? How many kimonos were sold as a direct result of Rush's fascination with them in the 1970s? The band is retired now and won't be coming back, so it's time to salute these geniuses by ranking every single song they ever did.

I have girded myself for potential resentment concerning this list.

First, the rules:

While Rush is Geddy Lee (née Gary Weinrib), Alex "Lerxst" Lifeson and Neil "The Professor" Peart, we will give the late John Rutsey his due. He was not a bad drummer, he just wasn't the right drummer. Rutsey-era Rush is represented in this ranking. However, the gang's solo work and side projects are not and, sadly, this means no "Take Off," Geddy's 1981 team-up with Bob & Doug McKenzie (aka his pals Rick Moranis and Dave Thomas), which clearly would have been ranked #1 if it counted. Beauty, eh?

Rush released 19 studio albums and a few stray singles, and all of those songs are ranked here. But I am using Spotify as my guide: If it's a single track on Spotify, then that's the song. For example, "By-Tor and the Snow Dog" is one song even if, on the album, it is listed as having four subsections, the third of which has four subsections of its own. This will work to the benefit of some songs due to their epic epicness, but detract from others where some sequences within the whole don't quite work as well as others (I'm looking at you "Fountains of Lamneth"). Additionally, Caress of Steel has a different track listing depending on when you bought the album and on what format. But going by Spotify rules, "Didacts and Narpets" is now part of "Fountains of Lamneth," regardless of what your old cassette tape said. These are important notes.

I will not be including live versions of pre-recorded Rush songs or live covers, but I will be including a few originals and improvisational instrumentals that debuted or were recorded live.

Alas, I can find no excuse for ranking the appearance of fellow Canadian Joe Flaherty's pre-recorded salute as Count Floyd at the beginning of the "The Weapon" on the Grace Under Pressure Tour album, so I am mentioning it here. I can't really justify including "Intro" from the same album and 1989's A Show of Hands either, but it's another good example of Rush not taking themselves too seriously. For a so-called power trio to open their shows with the Three Stooges theme (pre-recorded) says something. (Also a good time to mention that later concerts included a clip from South Park before they'd blast into their biggest hit, "Tom Sawyer.")

Lastly, there is no bad Rush. The first chunk of songs on this ranking get roasted pretty hard, but it's done with love. Rush rules. Anyone who disagrees can meet me during recess."

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#72
Here's a neat little article on a particular niche of Rush fans:

Just Like Hendrix

Rush -- quite possibly the whitest band on earth -- has a surprising number of black fans

by Craig D. Lindsey
July 21, 2004

https://m.riverfronttimes.com/stlouis/ju...id=2462099


"It all began late one Friday evening at the Houston radio station KTSU, during a broadcast of the popular rap show Kidz Jamm. Stevie C. and his crew were in the booth spinning choice cuts while a couple ladies struck up a conversation in the lobby.
As the time approached midnight, many a Dirty South rapper had ridden the airwaves during the past two hours. But then, suddenly, a rock song broke through.

"What is that?" one girl asked the other as the tune blasted out of the overhead speakers. And she didn't sound intrigued, either -- she sounded pissed that a hard-rock tune was hogging radio time that another crunk Lil Jon joint could've easily filled.

Another guy in the lobby (let's call him, um, me) walked into the booth to ask who and what the hell was playing.

"Rush," answered the DJ working the turntables. "'Tom Sawyer. '"

"Tom Sawyer"? Rush? On a rap show?

"I usually start off my mixes with that," the DJ replied.

And that's how my search began for black people who like Rush. Since then I've heard quite a few people of color go off about what would seem an anomalous love for the wildly polarizing band. "

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#73
Just read this piece on Costello. Interesting look back on his darkest period:


Elvis Costello’s ‘Get Happy!!’ at 40

The 1980 album is a bracing time capsule of a singer-songwriter at the height of his powers and coming apart under pressure


https://www.theringer.com/music/2020/2/1...nniversary

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#74
Thread:


https://twitter.com/NickPinkerton/status...9040688135



"The rise of punk is often framed as a reaction to prog excess, depicted as too technical, beardy, self-serious, huge drum kits, etc. In fact what popular music morass existed in the mid-70s is best represented by two horrors recently given biopic treatment, Queen and Elton John.

Much as elite interests have exacerbated racial divisions and animosities in order to forestall the formation of broad-based working-class coalitions, so prog has been falsely pitted against punk in order to benefit pop radio's ruling class. (Note the regal affect in "Queen.")


This decades-long conspiracy by corporate pop/Tin Pan Alley interests to illegitimize, humiliate, and destroy every remaining varietal of vernacular rock music has been planned to climax with the March 10 release of Trolls World Tour on Universal VOD."

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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#75
Word.
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#76
Quote:[/url]@JFrankensteiner
[url=https://twitter.com/JFrankensteiner/status/1246876314000384001]23h


The greatest mystery of our time, was the Paul Rudd who broke the news of Kurt Cobain's death to the Pearl Jam usenet group in 1994 THE Paul Rudd?

[Image: EU3KvKNXkAMZoqs?format=jpg&name=900x900]
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#77
(04-06-2020, 01:58 PM)Fat Elvis Wrote: Thread:


https://twitter.com/NickPinkerton/status...9040688135



"The rise of punk is often framed as a reaction to prog excess, depicted as too technical, beardy, self-serious, huge drum kits, etc. In fact what popular music morass existed in the mid-70s is best represented by two horrors recently given biopic treatment, Queen and Elton John.

Much as elite interests have exacerbated racial divisions and animosities in order to forestall the formation of broad-based working-class coalitions, so prog has been falsely pitted against punk in order to benefit pop radio's ruling class. (Note the regal affect in "Queen.")


This decades-long conspiracy by corporate pop/Tin Pan Alley interests to illegitimize, humiliate, and destroy every remaining varietal of vernacular rock music has been planned to climax with the March 10 release of Trolls World Tour on Universal VOD."

That sounds about right. I've heard old school punks talk far more about hating The Eagles than Yes or Floyd.
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#78
The old cliche that prog and punk are logical enemies always rubbed me the wrong way. Loads of post-punk and post-hardcore has delightful proggy leanings.
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#79
A Bit of Random:


https://twitter.com/unclecrizzle/status/...3779729409


In my opinion, @kurt_loder always did the best interviews with musicians on MTV. My favorite one is when he talked with @FINALLEVEL:"

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#80
haha please give me this!

"I want a Last Dance made up of the footage Guns n Roses filmed during the initial Use Your Illusion tour. They had a film crew follow them in the road for 2 years. Axl owns all the footage. Someone convince him."

https://twitter.com/CarterNixon/status/1...2990980102

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#81
https://twitter.com/keithpille/status/12...7380775936



[Image: EapxZu_VAAAhSZe?format=png&name=small]


[url=https://twitter.com/intent/like?tweet_id=1272954597380775936][/url]


"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#82
Hehehe.
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#83
I've been binge watching this series.  I had completely forgotten about this album.




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#84
This is the Real Deal Holyfield:


An Outkast Reading List


https://twitter.com/micro_chop/status/12...7787512834

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#85
I had no idea there's a new Go'Go's doc on Showtime - awesome!

How
@officialGoGos
got no respect from Rolling Stone magazine - adventures with
@belindaofficial
,
@Kathy_Valentine
,
@janewiedlin
..

With a documentary on the pioneering all-female band premiering on Showtime, here’s a look back at a career pinnacle that turned sour



https://www.thewrap.com/how-the-go-gos-g...-magazine/

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#86
This is the best story ever. I needed it. I'm in such a place it made me tear up. Bruuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuce.

https://twitter.com/Steven_Hyden/status/...1303440385

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#87
Springsteen seems to be such an all-around class act that I can't help but forgive him for the fact that I don't actually like his music that much.
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#88
He meets a guy named SATANovsky a few years before the height of his commercial success? Oh Bruce, what did you do?
Just this guy, you know?
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