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AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR - Post-Release Thread
#71


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#72
Also, that one extended cameo definitely got an audible "Holy Shit" from me. Biggest surprise of the movie for me. I was, however...gravely disappointed with Dinklage's role, even with the amusing "twist" to it (which I strongly suspect was what convinced him to take the role), he was REALLY phoning it in.
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#73
Forgot to say, I really adored how the martial art fights were done (a constant in the Russo Marvel movies really). They really do have an exceptional eye for choreography and staging for that particular type of action.
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#74
Spoilers






I went in expecting spectacle, quips, and characters I've become attached to interact with each other, and I got all of that and maybe some more. That said, the ending is a little iffy. I don't have a problem with ending on a cliffhanger, but half of the cast disappearing doesn't mean anything when its a safe bet, and then some, that they will be brought back to life in the next movie. Knowing about the source material is why the none of the deaths effected me. Peter was the exception. It was his pleading to Tony that got to me.

If the next movie handles everyone coming back to life well, then I may look at the ending of this movie in a more favorable light. Maybe Steve or Tony, or both sacrifice themselves to bring everyone back.

Somewhat questionable ending aside, this movie is a blast to watch. The entire cast plays well off each other. I laughed quite a few times. The epic battle in Wakanda is top notch.My favorite part of it was Bucky picking up Rocket and spinning around. The audience I watched with applauded quite a few times; probably more than they had too. I did join in for Cap's first appearance.

Brolin was great as Thanos. His motivation made sense, in a crazy megalomaniac way. His fatherly love for Gamora actually gave him depth. Beating up The Hulk was a great way to show just how much of a threat he was.

A little moment that I liked was Thor telling Rocket about he how he was going to kill Thanos. Underneath the bravado was someone still not over the loss of his entire family. It was a good character moment.

I liked Peter Dinklage's character; as well as finding out what happened to The Red Skull.

As for the post credits scene, it got me excited for Captain Marvel. Jackson saying mother then disappearing was an obvious joke, but it still made me smile. Speaking of easy jokes, I was glad that there where no Sherlock references with Stark and Strange.

My guess on why Banner couldn't Hulk out is because the Hulk is afraid to come out after getting his ass kicked by Thanos.

Lastly if I had to pick a favorite quip it would be: "I am Groot." "I am Steve Rodgers."
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is that I have lost my way. The good news is that I'm way ahead of schedule.
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#75
If you’re going to enjoy comic books or comic book movies pretty much at all, you have to learn to turn off the cynicism in the moment and just accept the experience. Stuff getting undone is just part of the package, but what they did they executed beautifully.
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#76
Did notice the conspicuous absence of the big trailer money shot. Kept waiting for Banner to finally Hulk out so it could happen.
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#77
Yeah that weirded me out too. Not that it would've changed the narrative or anything but that it was such a prevalent part of the advertising.

Makes me wonder how many post production shenanigans went on here.
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#78
(04-26-2018, 11:14 PM)chaz Wrote: Spoilers






I went in expecting spectacle, quips, and characters I've become attached to interact with each other, and I got all of that and maybe some more. That said, the ending is a little iffy. I don't have a problem with ending on a cliffhanger, but half of the cast disappearing doesn't mean anything when its a safe bet, and then some, that they will be brought back to life in the next movie. Knowing about the source material is why the none of the deaths effected me. Peter was the exception. It was his pleading to Tony that got to me.

See, those moments work for me too because I'm looking at it from the character's perspective.  Yes, as a viewer that's read a comic or two in his time, I know these deaths aren't going to be final (except maybe one or two), but in that moment, in this story, Peter and Tony don't know that.  Steve didn't know that when Bucky disappeared in front of him after only just getting him back.  Okoye didn't know that when her King just up and vanished, etc.
I know as a viewer there's a line in there where your suspension of disbelief bumps up against what you know to be true . . . but that doesn't make the moment the characters find themselves in and their performances relating to it any less.
Not a hard man to track. Leaves dead men wherever he goes.
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#79
(04-25-2018, 12:18 AM)the nz natural Wrote: More importantly . . . was that the same actor playing that character?  You know which one

No, I don't know which one, and now it's going to annoy me until people stop pussyfooting around and talk about the movie we all went to see.
"Looking at the Trump administration, I'm starting to think I was too hard on the characters in Prometheus."  --  MrBananaGrabber
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#80
I fucking loved it.

More soon. It wasn't perfect but I thought it was great.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

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#81
(04-26-2018, 11:16 PM)superlaser Wrote: If you’re going to enjoy comic books or comic book movies pretty much at all, you have to learn to turn off the cynicism in the moment and just accept the experience. Stuff getting undone is just part of the package, but what they did they executed beautifully.

You know this is the turn your brain off comment, right?

Also, this is one of the primary reasons why I don’t enjoy comic books.
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#82
I respectfully disagree. "Turn off your cynicism" and "turn off your brain" are far from the same thing.

On the contrary, this movie challenges the audience to keep up. And those reviews where the critics dismissed the action scenes as "mere spectacle" were written by technical illiterates who couldn't see the labor that went into delivering some of those scenes from the concept stage to the cinema screen.
"Looking at the Trump administration, I'm starting to think I was too hard on the characters in Prometheus."  --  MrBananaGrabber
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#83
(04-27-2018, 12:54 AM)Reasor Wrote: On the contrary, this movie challenges the audience to keep up. And those reviews where the critics dismissed the action scenes as "mere spectacle" were written by technical illiterates who couldn't see the labor that went into delivering some of those scenes from the concept stage to the cinema screen.

By this measure nothing is pure spectacle. Everything you see in a movie is hard. Your least favorite film ever? A bitch to make, with people pouring their hearts and souls into it.
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#84
(04-27-2018, 12:40 AM)Reasor Wrote:
(04-25-2018, 12:18 AM)the nz natural Wrote: More importantly . . . was that the same actor playing that character?  You know which one

No, I don't know which one, and now it's going to annoy me until people stop pussyfooting around and talk about the movie we all went to see.

You and I both know I'm talking about Red Skull.  We also both know you're not that dumb and all of this aggression just seems like a deliberate ploy to get someone to call you a cunt.  Which I'm happy to do but it doesn't help anyone get anywhere.

I'm talking about Red Skull.  Keep up, ya dumb cunt.
Not a hard man to track. Leaves dead men wherever he goes.
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#85
(04-27-2018, 12:47 AM)The Dark Shape Wrote:
(04-26-2018, 11:16 PM)superlaser Wrote: If you’re going to enjoy comic books or comic book movies pretty much at all, you have to learn to turn off the cynicism in the moment and just accept the experience. Stuff getting undone is just part of the package, but what they did they executed beautifully.

You know this is the turn your brain off comment, right?

Also, this is one of the primary reasons why I don’t enjoy comic books.

It’s not a ‘turn off your brain’ thing, it’s a suspension of disbelief thing. Some people can buy the moment even knowing all the reasons it won’t stick, and others just don’t. To really get into the comic booky stuff, you have to be able to do that. It’s not a judgement thing; feeling or not feeling that way doesn’t make anyone better, worse, smarter or dumber. It’s just differences in how people things, and clearly I’m right about not being able to tune out the ‘it’ll all get undone’ voice in the moment affects enjoyment of the film.
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#86
So.... that was a lot of stuff. Of the two people I saw it with, one described as "Second Act: The Movie" and the other as "a two-hour season of television," both of which are entirely accurate.

But among my many, many question is this: Why give THAT role to Carrie Coon?

And I guess "Avengers 4: Let's Save Everyone Who Still Has A Contract" is too long for a title.
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#87
Just got back from this. It’s a bit to digest.

I will say that Drax had two lines that made me laugh for minutes.

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#88
Loved it. The pairing of Rocket and Thor was fantastic. Also, this movie was hard as FUCK on the Guardians. They took the biggest beating by far.
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#89
I will say: the post-credits scene has me frickin' AMPED for Captain Marvel to finally make her debut.
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#90
Finally got around to seeing this tonight with my kids. Lot to unpack.

Let's get started.

I've been kind of down on the MCU-Filmverse for a while now. While I absolutely loved Thor: Ragnarok, I loved it for its outright rejection of much of increasingly stale trappings of its predecessors and for embracing comedy and a radically different tone.

I look at the MCU as a pre and post Avengers Assemble world. The first few films, be it the great Iron Man, or the even better Captain America, or to a lesser extent Thor, there was a sense of real stakes. The villains made sense. Everyone acted fairly consistently with their characterizations. Arcs MEANT something ... they didn't build and then fizzle out entirely as the directors/writers shied away from the very narrative that the film was devoting itself to (I'm looking at you, Civil War, Winter Soldier, and several others). And, most importantly, tone was consistent.

After Avengers Assemble, IMHO the cracks have grown increasingly wide in terms of the presentation of pretty much all of the concepts discussed in the preceding paragraph. I don't want to re-review old movies, but one-dimensional villains, villains with no understandable motives, inconsistent drama/conflict between characters that never leads to any type of meaningful pay-off ... it's been all over the place. And, what may be even worse, I feel like many of the films rushed through major conflicts and bled future narratives dry simply so we can get a "neat" resolution at the end (Black Panther, IMHO, being the biggest offender).

Then there are the special effects. ILM's best days seem to be done. I don't think it's any accident that almost all of Infinity War was NOT given to ILM, and instead farmed out to other FX houses.

So I did not come into Infinity War with high hopes. In fact, I was kind of dreading sitting through it. I expected another round of manufactured-drama and faux tension with maybe a few losses, but it will all be telegraphed and formulaic.

And instead, I came out thinking the film was a triumph.

From the opening scenes, holy shit. I haven't felt that immediately engaged and actually WORRIED about events on-screen in an MCU film in a loooooong time. Visceral, powerful, surprising ... I was hooked. And then the film just took me on a roller coaster. The juggling job that the Russo Bros did with all of these characters and overlapping narratives, balancing humor (there isn't as much of it as I thought there would be) with, frankly, horror ... it was really excellent.

Thor/Hemsworth was great, Drax continues to steal the show (an angel mated with a pirate ... line of the year?) ... Cap's return was incredibly well received, I'm not sure about Bettany as the damsel who continuously needs to be saved, but Elizabeth Olsen (and her plots) did a fantastic job.

Not sure Black Widow would survive going toe to toe with any of the henchmen for more than a few seconds, but whatever. Gotta have some plot-required power shrink/creep, right?

And then there is Thanos himself, who surely will take his place in the pantheon of great genre antagonists. A tragedy involving his home planet has, quite obviously, driven him insane. But, it's a tragedy we can relate to (and perhaps see the handwriting on our own walls). If you watch him carefully, he almost never does anything more than he feels he must to accomplish his mission. It's an insane, homicidal mission, but there's a lot more Ozymandias to him than there is [INSERT GENERIC WORLD-KILLING MONSTER HERE]. He would prefer to let the 50/50 hands of fate choose who dies. Thanos defeats, he incapacitates, but he seems to kill only when he [delusion-ally] feels he must. I was dreading another fake feeling battle scene but these felt real, with real physics, real deaths, real action. The battle in Wakanda, compared to Black Panther, is basically the major leagues versus rookie ball in terms of special effects work.

Thanos's scene with Gamora and then the finale where he DOES sit back and watch the sun rise ... I'm amazed Marvel actually gave us that. If anything, it makes Thanos somehow not only feel even more bizarrely unhinged, but also somehow relate-able. From a certain point of view, this movie is a chronicle of Thanos's triumph against overwhelming odds. The final scenes gave me the same vibe as the final pages of Watchmen.

For a film series like this to work, there has to be some risks. The heroes must fail, at least once in a while. You must feel that characters you care about are in real peril, or quickly the immersion breaks. Infinity War, I believe, was a triumphant return to the earlier days of the MCU, when you felt like the events you were seeing mattered in terms of an uncertain outcome. I'll give you one example: the Avengers are in Wakanda and they are going to re-program Vision's brain to remove the gem. It is a major focal point. Thanks to pretty much every prior MCU film, you just assume it's going to work. Because these jury-rigged solutions ALWAYS work in the MCU. And what happens? They fail. They fail and people die. Horribly. And the heroes do everything they can to recover from that failure, and then they fail again.

The references to past films, also brilliant. I like that Rhodes explicitly says that he paid for his mistakes in Civil War, and they show him with electronic legs. Frankly, correcting a major error in that film. The film's running time is just chock full of moments like that, and yet none of it overstays its welcome.

But, perhaps, the best praise I can give the film is this: for the first time since the era of Captain America Prime-through-Avengers Assemble, I'm really engaged in finding out what happens with these characters next.

*Red Skull!!!!!

**You know the Empire Strikes Back comparisons in terms of the ending are coming. You know it, don't you?
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#91
Up until Homecoming, I ragged a lot on Marvel stuff post-Winter Soldier. I've disliked the other Avengers movies.

I fucking loved this. It's their Wrath of Khan.

Josh Brolin gives one of the best performances of his career as Thanos. Like a Highlander villain written by Hemingway.
"PREDATOR 2 feels like it was penned by convicts as part of a correctional facility's creative writing program, and that's what I love about it." - Moltisanti
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#92
(04-27-2018, 02:47 AM)Overlord Wrote: Thanos's scene with Gamora and then the finale where he DOES sit back and watch the sun rise ... I'm amazed Marvel actually gave us that.  If anything, it makes Thanos somehow not only feel even more bizarrely unhinged, but also somehow relate-able.  From a certain point of view, this movie is a chronicle of Thanos's triumph against overwhelming odds.  The final scenes gave me the same vibe as the final pages of Watchmen. 

The way that Thanos' quest is given a beginning and an end does a lot to create the feeling of a complete movie, despite it being part one of two.

If I were a parent, I'd be thanking God for the scene where Thanos rewinds time to undo the Vision's first death, just so I could talk down my traumatized kids using the given example of how the heroes will be brought back.  Sure, there should be stakes, and there are stakes as far as the characters know, but it's a family film and the ending is one kick in the balls after another.  Having the characters die off one at a time instead of all at once made the shock over who lives and who dies drag itself out.

I won't be surprised if Ant-Man and the Wasp ends with characters dying as the timeline of events catches up.  It'll just be a question of who.
"Looking at the Trump administration, I'm starting to think I was too hard on the characters in Prometheus."  --  MrBananaGrabber
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#93
(04-27-2018, 01:18 AM)superlaser Wrote:
(04-27-2018, 12:47 AM)The Dark Shape Wrote:
(04-26-2018, 11:16 PM)superlaser Wrote: If you’re going to enjoy comic books or comic book movies pretty much at all, you have to learn to turn off the cynicism in the moment and just accept the experience. Stuff getting undone is just part of the package, but what they did they executed beautifully.

You know this is the turn your brain off comment, right?

Also, this is one of the primary reasons why I don’t enjoy comic books.

It’s not a ‘turn off your brain’ thing, it’s a suspension of disbelief thing. Some people can buy the moment even knowing all the reasons it won’t stick, and others just don’t. To really get into the comic booky stuff, you have to be able to do that. It’s not a judgement thing; feeling or not feeling that way doesn’t make anyone better, worse, smarter or dumber. It’s just differences in how people things, and clearly I’m right about not being able to tune out the ‘it’ll all get undone’ voice in the moment affects enjoyment of the film.

Except you totally are framing it in a "ya gotta turn off your brain" a la Bayformers.

More importantly, Comic book movies don't get that pass because actual comic books have proven to be well-written, and actual thoughtful. And my argument against the Marvel films has always been they're too over reliant on star power (like, I like Thor: Ragnorak but holy shit is that movie just 2 hours of Chris Hemsworth mugging it up for the camera) than actual character development.  These movies assume my empathy for Captain America--just because he's Captain America and played by Chris Evans.

To Marvel Studio's credit, they have been getting better; I liked both Homecoming and Black Panther because the film put in the extra effort of making both Spider-man and Black Panther into fully-formed characters without being dependent on prior films.
 I think all Marvel films are okay. This is my design.

Except for Thor 2: the literal worst.
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#94
not too shabby
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#95
WHAT DOES THAT EVEN MEAN?!!
 I think all Marvel films are okay. This is my design.

Except for Thor 2: the literal worst.
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#96
it means what it means!

I liked it! I think the Russos/Markus/McFeely are really great at making this type of movie. These unnatural, unwieldy, contrived-to-the-core, blockbusters.
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#97
Saw this last night, and as a spectate it's superb. As a whole film, it's very good, and as ever there's a few wrong beats. But so much good stuff.

Did anyone else think Wakanda's defences seemed a little weak for a nation that presumably has planned for an invasion for foreign forces for centuries? Where was the tech shown in the BP movie?

Most worrying thing about this film is that from now on, all the Alt-right online trolls are going to be quoting Thanos lines ad nauseam.
"Los Gringos Locos will be avenged!""Two horrible kids who deserve to be cast in Powder 2" - Nick Nunziata
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#98
I know that some people don't like RAGNAROK due to how flip and light it was about everything.

But considering how INFINITY WAR starts, I feel like that lightness really works out in terms of the contrast between the movies.  

HEY, EVERYTHING WILL BE OK.

WHOOPS.  NO IT WON'T.


Also... after CIVIL WAR, I suggested that I may have reached my limit when it came to these team-up movies, because regardless of how well they were put together... I could feel the movie straining to work all these characters into the story

so I figured, Infinity War would have to strain even harder with even more characters to juggle

but I think the REALLY barebones plot actually worked to INFINITY WAR's favor when it came to my subjective issue with CIVIL WAR.

MY THEORY is that it's because CIVIL WAR was really trying to have all these characters in a relatively mysterious plot that was also trying to say something about SERIOUS ISSUES as characters were conflicted about very personal things.  And having to juggle all these others characters out of obligation is a strain on that.

But INFINITY WAR's advantage is that its very basic GALACTIC WARLORD plot is VERY amenable to giving ALL of the heroes the same essential goal and pairing them off in fun ways.

Marvel basically gave me the mega-scale live-action Dragon Ball Z movie that Hollywood utterly failed to give me the last time (not that I expected it to be any good to begin with hahahah).  That's pretty cool.  And to go along with the big-basic-comic-booky tone, I really don't mind at all that the status quo will return as long as the excitement and drama works in the moment, which INFINITY WAR did for me.  That's how I read Dragon Ball as a kid.  I knew things would return to normal happily, but it was great drama to see the heroes fight through hell to wish their friends back.

I also thought that Brolin and Saldana were doing some really great work for what I thought was the heart of the movie.  In terms of giving a sense of nuance/pathos to a GALACTIC WARLORD OBSESSED WITH DESTROYING HALF THE UNIVERSE, I found it quite compelling in that space-opera-fantasy way.

Strange/Stark was a GREAT pairing as was Thor/Rocket Rabbit.

Loved seeing Red Skull FINALLY come back in a really fun and mysterious way.  I did let out a "HA!" when I realized who it was.  I figured it wasn't Weaving this time even though the character was clearly CG.  Would've been nice to hear his voice as the character again, but the replacement they got to do it was good.

Also, I got a good laugh in the moment where Stark was trying to stop Quill from going apeshit while struggling to take the gauntlet off of Thanos!

"WE ALMOST HAVE IT OFF!!!!!!!  NOOOOOOO!!!!"


And about the post-credit scene?  I kinda wished the message Fury was trying to send was meant for .... COULSON.  I would've laughed heartily.

(04-25-2018, 03:16 AM)the nz natural Wrote: I will say there was another moment in here that demonstrated just how tone deaf modern audiences are and that was Quill pulling the trigger/bubbles.  At least half my audience laughed their asses off at it - it was Logan beating up the truck with the shovel all over again.  People really don't understand what they're watching most of the time.

I would disagree with that and suggest that both moments (INFINITY and LOGAN) are definitely meant to elicit some laughs in the audience.

They're not tone deaf.  They're responding the way I the directors wanted them to.  (especially that shot of wide shot of Logan impotently beating up on the truck with the shovel.  it would not have been shot like that if it wasn't meant to elicit some laughter)

Thanos really likes bubbles.  It's kinda cute!
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#99
I guess to my sort-of credit the bubbles moment laughter was more of an "Oh man that's fucked up" kind of thing. Props to Zoe Saldana in that scene though, that look she gives to Peter afterwards is a perfect blend of adoration and anguish. And I really should have seen Gamora's fate coming when they were resolving the romantic subplot in a movie not titled "Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 3."

And as Reasor notes, the big trailer "money shot" wasn't in it, not even in a form with Hulk composited out/swapped with the Hulkbuster. I have a feeling that shot was made for the trailer and never really intended for the movie, but I guess it COULD have been intended to have that entire crew charging Thanos en-masse (it looks like it's in the more forested terrain of the final showdown vs. the savannah of the clash of armies). And as I think on it without that shot this movie is actually devoid of any of the big "splash page" full-team moments, but makes up for it in big "hero moments" for individual characters or smaller groups. Honestly with the exception of the Vision (who spends most of the film incapacitated in some form or another) EVERYONE seems like they took a level in badass prior to this film. Wanda maybe most of all.

Not seeing a lot of commentary on Dr. Strange, who definitely plays a huge part, and I felt was really one of the MVPs overall.

Also I really enjoyed the Maw. He was a fun, powerful henchman-type character that I felt was perhaps gone a bit too soon, especially as his cohorts had little-to-no personality compared to him. Hell, he felt like a character that could have been the main villain of another movie.

I know the Red Skull wasn't Weaving but they faked it well.

I guess Korg, Miek, and Valkyrie were with the other half of the Asgardians/Sakaarans that Thanos apparently didn't kill.
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(04-27-2018, 06:18 AM)jmacq1 Wrote: I guess Korg, Miek, and Valkyrie were with the other half of the Asgardians/Sakaarans that Thanos apparently didn't kill.

was Thanos applying his KILL-HALF MO in that scene?  I was never quite sure about that.  Because if so, where did they all go?  The ship is gone.
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(04-27-2018, 06:20 AM)Nooj Wrote:
(04-27-2018, 06:18 AM)jmacq1 Wrote: I guess Korg, Miek, and Valkyrie were with the other half of the Asgardians/Sakaarans that Thanos apparently didn't kill.

was Thanos applying his KILL-HALF MO in that scene?  I was never quite sure about that.  Because if so, where did they all go?  The ship is gone.

Well, Thor specifically says to the Guardians later that Thanos "killed half of my people" so it seems so.  There was the Grandmaster's ship still in the mix, I suppose, or maybe Thanos gave them one to let them escape.  Or Heimdall Bifrosted them somewhere before he got injured.

Given the way things were set up I'd imagine if Valkyrie at the very least were meant to be dead they'd have shown it.  Korg I could see them skipping.
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Saw it last night. It was solid enough but with a few rough patches.

Dinklage was brilliant and unexpected as was the hooded guy who turns up half-way. But that moment with Starlord, that cheap plot contrivance. Woof, that stunk. However the mashup of Thor and the Guardians early on was pure gold - more of that please.

Had no idea about the way it ended or that there’s going to be another next year.

However, I know that whenever there’s a time-travel/time-manipulation device in any movie, well whoever dies will be coming back in act 3. I mean that’s just movies. So when they all started getting flaky I was waiting for the big turn-around and ohhoho Tony Stark’s done something clever to reverse it all. But nope. That was it. Fuck.

The deaths were pretty creepy in their randomness, however the Peter Parker death was a standout and hit me proper. Tom Holland sold that last 5 seconds. Shit that was tough and that performance, despite the billions of dollars of effects we’d just sat through was probably the highlight of the movie.

And here’s a thing, I think Thanos was a fucking great villain. I can’t get behind his wiping out a half of the universe’s population at random due to overcrowding and finite resource, but I also kind of can. When he was monologuing he came across quite measured, and I was thinking he kind of had a point. And another thing, when have we ever seen a villain victorious? Truly victorious. I mean, he won. The villain fucking won. And what did he do? He didn’t sit in a huge throne and reign fire and death over everyone because he could and he’s eeeeeeevil. He just sat outside his hut and enjoyed the sunshine and peace and quiet and quietly smiled to himself. That’s a great fucking villain they’ve created ther, simply because you can relate to him.
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I like the Heimdall suggestion!

(04-27-2018, 06:29 AM)Stale Elvis Wrote: however the Peter Parker death was a standout and hit me proper. Tom Holland sold that last 5 seconds. Shit that was tough and that performance, despite the billions of dollars of effects we’d just sat through was probably the highlight of the movie.

And here’s a thing, I think Thanos was a fucking great villain. I can’t get behind his wiping out a half of the universe’s population at random due to overcrowding and finite resource, but I also kind of can.  When he was monologuing he came across quite measured, and I was thinking he kind of had a point. And another thing, when have we ever seen a villain victorious? Truly victorious. I mean, he won. The villain fucking won. And what did he do? He didn’t sit in a huge throne and reign fire and death over everyone because he could and he’s eeeeeeevil. He just sat outside his hut and enjoyed the sunshine and peace and quiet and quietly smiled to himself. That’s a great fucking villain they’ve created ther, simply because you can relate to him.

I don't necessarily relate to him, but they successfully managed to make his motivations compelling in a way that bucked the usual GALACTIC WARLORD character in these kinds of stories.

They also managed to make him supremely threatening while at the same time not making him come across too ridiculously powerful throughout.  He bests the Hulk in a one on one, but the sequences of multiple heroes taking him on were really really well done in terms of making sure everyone played up their fun idiosyncracies while keeping the action/objectives/reveals really clear.

And yeah, Holland is really amazing at selling Peter's despair and fear when he's at his lowest.  Of course, that's when the ashy-fade-out goes the slowest!  Hahahaha.

About that contrivance?  I wonder how many people will come out of this movie cursing Quill's name???
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Yeah someone behind me in the theater barked out a GOD DAMMIT at that, but it really was perfectly in character for Quill.

Also poor, poor Rocket.  He literally lost everybody (well except maybe new pal Thor).  Steve lost both his besties too.  

Will be curious about the reaction to axing (however temporarily) nearly all their people of color and all but the “first girl” of the Avengers (since I’d be really surprised to see Okoye or Shuri joining the Avengers full time).

Also that sequence of folks fading away was really well done.  Dissonantly serene which just packed in the despair, and a couple good swerves (like T’Challa and Okoye where you assume it’s going to be her and then suddenly he’s gone).
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For a guy whose father killed his mother and who then had to kill that father, and who then watched his adoptive father die, Quill's reaction to losing yet another person he loved didn't seem like a contrivance to me.
My karmic debt must be huge.

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My blog: An Embarrassment of Rich's
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