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Sony’s Spider-verse: the Next Dark Universe?
#36
(06-27-2018, 08:39 PM)bradito Wrote: I honestly think that's how 98% of the folks around here entertain themselves. They hate every poster, every trailer, every movie. But they really get a kick out of reminding you how much they hate them.

No idea if you count me as part of the 98% but I'll assume you do....

The light answer is that snark is fun and criticizing is easier than articulating what you like. Sometimes there's a schoolyard joy in seeing who can come up with the most creative way to put a film down.

Weightier response: Sturgeon's 90/10 rule applies to film as well as it does to books, music, TV, and so on. Most films aren't good. Many are outright terrible. Given the amount of talent, money, and cinematic/box office history available, there's something tragically hilarious that so many films turn out to be bad.

So many posters and trailers are made with little creativity or originality. Floating heads! BWAAAAAM! Humorous line following the title! Etc. Etc.

Let's take Mortal Engines as an example. It's a great premise for a story (film or book). I would love for the film to be solidly good or even great, a story with characters, plot, and visuals that resonate and appeal to more than just a YA audience. I'd feel a twinge of nerd victory if Christian Rivers, whom I remember from the LOTR EE discs BTS stuff, were to score a home run on his first directorial outing. But the trailers aren't good. The dialogue seems clunky, simple, and very tropey. The visuals are neat but aren't really offering anything new or overly amazing (subjective, I know) and I think audiences have become very used to films that are CGI-heavy (meaning it takes a lot to distinguish them). None of the characters pop. PLUS, rightly or wrongly, it seems to be solidly within the recent genre of YA dystopia/post-apocalyptic stories, most of which are themselves pretty derivative. Given how only the Hunger Games films have done anything to distinguish themselves from the pack (box-office-wise; apparently the story itself is also derivative or owes a lot to other films and stories), and how most of these attempts at YA SF franchises have resulted in films that are OK at best, I don't think skepticism and a predisposition towards being critical of Mortal Engines is unwarranted.

Yes, I realize the studios exist primarily to turn a profit. That's fine, by itself. That doesn't obligate me (or anyone) to accept or encourage pervasively safe, middle of the road storytelling from them. 

Having said all that: I'm with you on finding the habit of shitposting in threads about films you don't like annoying and unproductive. It's one thing to have an honest, ongoing dialogue about a film, even if you don't like it. It's another to just cap all over someone's enthusiasm. I'm always saddened when longtime members like Dickson are essentially chased from a post-release thread by nerd stench and unrelenting negativity.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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#37
Ever notice that the snark and criticism applies to every movie on here though? Not just one set of films (which deserve it for many reasons) and if I got upset about that I wouldn't post on any boards whatsoever. At the end of the day they're just movies and not worth taking a bullet for.

Back on topic though, that VENOM trailer was awful.
Originally Posted by ImmortanNick 

Saw Batman v Superman.
Now I know what it's like to see Nickelback in concert.

That's my review.
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#38
I am a defender of Spiderman III, warts and all. I did not follow Venom's turrible late 90s run, but in my head cannon, Venom getting kicked out of Peter Parker and into his doppelganger, Eddie Brock has a nice symmetry. It is why I liked Topher Grace as Brock. Venom as the Punisher...well, I am not so much into that. Eddie Brock or Venom built like a Rob Liefield character? Not into that at all. I like Tom Hardy (except for Star Trek Nemesis...), but hard hitting reporter/champion of the people Eddie Brock? That just feels wrong.
"Wilford Brimley can't be bothered to accept praise. He doesn't act because he thinks people will enjoy his work. He acts because it's his goddamned job." --Will Harris, AV Club
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#39
Brad leaves for 5 weeks like a Dad that “went out for cigarettes “ and comes back criticizing the color of the rug.


But, he’s my Dad, and I still love him.
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#40
So that putative film Silver and Black about Silver Sable and Black Cat? Well, now it's Silver AND Black... in that instead of having one movie with both characters, they've decided to do a separate film about each one.

https://deadline.com/2018/08/silver-and-...202443207/
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#41
So, if I'm keeping track, this brings us up to four (Black Cat, Silver Sable, Morbius, Kraven). Does this mean Sony's feeling good about Venom?
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#42
(06-29-2018, 10:27 PM)call me roy Wrote: Brad leaves for 5 weeks like a Dad that “went out for cigarettes “ and comes back criticizing the color of the rug.


But, he’s my Dad, and I still love him.

I have a large adult son.
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#43
(08-09-2018, 02:55 PM)Pither Wrote: So, if I'm keeping track, this brings us up to four (Black Cat, Silver Sable, Morbius, Kraven). Does this mean Sony's feeling good about Venom?

If Venom was actually made for 40-50 million, I don't see how they can't feel great right about now.
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#44
Just give it up Sony, it's not happening.

Not that they won't keep trying and failing.
Originally Posted by ImmortanNick 

Saw Batman v Superman.
Now I know what it's like to see Nickelback in concert.

That's my review.
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#45
Assuming Sony has the same "you have to keep making movies in order to hold onto the rights" deal that other studios had with Marvel, each of these announced titles can probably be thought of as a separate roll of the dice that one of them will actually make it out of pre-production and preserve Sony's grip on the whole portfolio.
"Looking at the Trump administration, I'm starting to think I was too hard on the characters in Prometheus."  --  MrBananaGrabber
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#46
Assuming "Spider-Verse" makes money-- and I think it ought to, because it looks fantastic-- I don't see why the hell Sony doesn't just aim to make *their* cinematic universe an animated one:

Using all the characters they own, including Spider-Man, interconnectedly as a distinct alternative to the MCU, rather than rolling the dice on live action versions of characters almost nobody's heard of that, at best, will come off (especially if MCU Spidey can't show up) as a low-rent MCU. There are a lot more possibilities in animation, generally. Cast big celebrities in all the voice roles. Shit, have Tom Hardy do a different silly voice for all the roles.

What they're doing just seems like flailing. Teaming up Black Cat and Silver Sable, by the way, at least held some intrigue for me. I could see that as a sort-of unique team-up of female characters who otherwise could be at odds. So, there that goes.
Our sanitariums are full of men who think they're Napoleon... Or God.
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#47
Because there’s a general audience stigma/box office handicap that says animated films are ‘lesser’. It’s as simple as that.
Superlaser speaks for me from now on.

-Bart
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#48
Even if any of these long lamented, un-released films turned out far better than everyone seems to expect, there's a great many of you that, somehow, I'd think you'd just keep right on hating on it anyway..
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#49
But Fraid!  Sturgeon’s 90/10 rule, so eloquently referenced by MM above, is th opposite for you. You like 90% of movies you see!  No one can compete with those numbers.
If you're happy, you're not paying attention.

Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny: 
Glad that you guys worked that out amongst yourselves.

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#50
I think it's more like, I like 90% of the movies that I watch, there are many genres that I don't bother with almost completely. If it ain't action, adventure, comic-book, disaster, fantasy, horror/slasher, sci-fi, superhero or western then I probably have not and will not ever watch it. There's the odd one here or there that thrills me in some way either through a performance or aesthetic qualities of some sort. Something like Mississippi Burning for example. Because a Gene Hackman performance has the same effect on my brain as a good action scene or FX. I guess I've just remained very uncynical. I go into every movie READY to love it. So...to hate something that I'm looking forward to, it had to have shit the bed HARD (see: Independunce Day 2 and Suicide Squad)..
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#51
(08-10-2018, 08:00 AM)superlaser Wrote: Because there’s a general audience stigma/box office handicap that says animated films are ‘lesser’. It’s as simple as that.

If it were such a handicap, the studios would stay away from animation altogether, which is clearly not the case.

I'd say that live-action carries more "prestige" and is taken more seriously-- but prestige can't be what they're going for by strip-mining all this IP. They're chasing that cinematic univese grail because they think it's a moneymaker. Animation seems like an elegant way to do that without coming off like an ersatz MCU-- look at how badly that's been going for other studios.

But what do I know? Tbh, it's more that it's something *I'd* like to see done, creatively. 

I guess we'll see how Venom and Spider-Verse do relative to each other, and if that changes the equation any.

(08-10-2018, 08:13 AM)fraid uh noman Wrote: Even if any of these long lamented, un-released films turned out far better than everyone seems to expect, there's a great many of you that, somehow, I'd think you'd just keep right on hating on it anyway..

Give my regards to Shazam!, would you?
Our sanitariums are full of men who think they're Napoleon... Or God.
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#52
Even I think Shazam looks like Sha-it. I'd love to be proven wrong..
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#53
I see... But if you're not, it's because it's genuinely bad. Everybody else is just hating for hate's sake.
Our sanitariums are full of men who think they're Napoleon... Or God.
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#54
No...I like a whole lot of bad movies and know and admit that they're bad. I'm just simply saying that I don't understand going into so many movies with the knives already out and ready to pounce..

My perspective is a tad skewed though. I like so many movies that so many people hating so many movies may seem to me like hating for hating's sake. And that makes me wrong..
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#55
The whole damn premise of this thread is whether what Sony's doing seems like a good idea, considering they failed at it a few years ago-- when they were actually making Spider-Man movies. I'm sorry if it distresses you that people think the Venom movie looks bad. Just consider the hurt feelings of all the poor folks looking forward to Shazam, is all I'm saying.
Our sanitariums are full of men who think they're Napoleon... Or God.
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#56
I'm sorry if I've bothered you. I WAS off topic somewhat. I said I was wrong...which, I believe means I agreed with you. Nothing about any of this distresses me. I was just talkin..
*holds up hands* *backs out*

For the record...while I do hold out hope for liking this lone Venom movie....a Sony Spider-verse sounds really bad. This Venom movie shoulda fully been in the MCU..
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