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VELVET BUZZSAW Discussion
#1
A horror-satire with that cast from the director that brought you NIGHTCRAWLER? 


Sure. 





That looks WILD.
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#2
Looks absolutely bonkers!

I'm totally in, because I think NIGHTCRAWLER is basically a masterpiece, but I can easily envision a scenario where this movie ends up being deeply silly.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#3
Looks ridiculous.
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#4
An 80's Stuart Gordon horror movie from the director of Nightcrawler with Jake Gyllenhaal as Jeffrey Combs? Holy fucking shit. I can't be the only one who got that vibe plus a little In the Mouth of Madness thrown in.

This could be worse than The Predator and I'd still marry it.
"PREDATOR 2 feels like it was penned by convicts as part of a correctional facility's creative writing program, and that's what I love about it." - Moltisanti
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#5
I got some Nocturnal Animals vibes but more fun, less dreadful.
the empire never ended
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#6
Gives new meaning to Art Horror!
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#7
Another trailer showing too much.

God life is hard.
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#8
That's giving me heavy 70s/80s British mystery show vibes, like The Tales of the Unexpected or the sort of funny book strips like The Collector. Which is a good thing, by the way.
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#9
After the very REAL feeling human horror of Nightcrawler connected so well with me, this looks a little too... Crappy teen horror flick.
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#10
Despite the fact that literally no one in that cast is a teenager?
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#11
I am particularly curious as to how one goes from Nightcrawler to this. Gyllenhaal appears to be channeling Nicolas Cage, which is neither a good or bad thing, at this point. Okja argues bad.

My hope is that this is simply too bizarre to make a big marketing push on. Hence the spoilers, almost immediate release date, etc. But I'm certainly going to watch the hell out of it.
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#12
(01-11-2019, 04:44 AM)boone daniels Wrote: Despite the fact that literally no one in that cast is a teenager?

Yes. This doesn't look like a dime a dozen supernatural flick that gets lobbed out for teenagers on Friday nights to you? It's another Ouija with SLIGHTLY more interesting dressings.
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#13
Either this is a case of a lost 80s/90s Clive Barker script getting adapted, or were in for something like The Neon Demon.
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#14
Reviews are starting to trickle in, and it's sounding promising. Apparently very funny, sharp, and gory.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#15
Watching this now and it just seems like a giant mess. The trailer kind of makes Velvet Buzzsaw look like some Night Gallery episode, but the movie does this even more so. This feels like it was meant to be a pilot for some new anthology series that got expanded into a film. It isn't until like the 50 minute mark (somewhere around the middle of the movie) that it feels like it gets going, and around an hour and 26 minutes in there's a scene that if it was a show feels like it would be the end.

The whole thing is just weird, it seems to be the director trying his hand at some Italian Argento shit and just doing it badly. All the kills are framed wrong so they have none of the beautiful grotesqueness they seem to be aiming for. There's a kill at one point in the movie where a hand comes out of the darkness like in the original Suspiria, but it has none of the atmosphere and strangeness of that Suspiria version.

It's also badly put together. The movie sets up Gyllenhaal's character as if he as a mystery to solve, the mystery of whole this painter actually is...like of like how Suspiria has Suzy trying to uncover who Helena Markos is and what exactly the deal is with that dance school. The thing is not only does the movie do nothing with this, but it tells you all about him before it can. I guess as a joke the movie gives you an actual detective character too who we also don't see uncovering anything. And not seeing that stuff would be all well and good if the movie had other stuff going one, or was some big exercise in style where mood, atmosphere, and the Argento style set pieces kills carried it; but it isn't that.

There is a funny running gag with Natalia Dyer's character, and there's some funny moments here and there, but outside of that there isn't really much else.

There's also this weird thing that happens where for a moment (well a little longer than that, a few scenes) when Gyllenhaal is getting his eyes checked the whole look of the movie changes into something better looking.

I'd say probably just watch Murder Party (which may still be on Netflix) instead of this if you haven't seen that already. The subject matter is much the same (outside of haunted painting) and one of the big kills is even the same.
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#16
Are you using your phone in a cinema?
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#17
It's a Netflix movie, so it dropped on Netflix today.
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#18
Was he watching Netflix on his phone in the cinema?
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#19
haha this movie is so weird
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#20
Bailed about an hour in. The art world satire stuff was mildly watchable, although not particularly compelling. The two horror set pieces were laughable.

Maybe I'll finish it later. I dunno.
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#21
Okay, I decided to finish it and, boy, what a corntastic piece of crap!
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#22
So, not exactly Nightcrawler 2.0?
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#23
Lol, Nightcrawler actually had a structure.
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#24
nah. This is really fun. Velvet Buzzsaw is clearly a love-letter to Brian De Palma's sense of horror: just being utterly trashy with its tongue firmly planted in its cheek. Buzzsaw isn't really taking itself that seriously so I took more pleasure in its takedown of the monetizing of art than the actual horror aspects of it.

Also, Jake Gyllenhall looks like he's having the time of his life here.
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#25
That's great in concept, but the execution here felt like a first draft pushed into production. Just a messy slog through to get through. The plot points felt like they kept coming in at the wrong time, it's completely devoid of stakes and tension (strange, because Nightcrawler has to be one of the tensest movies this decade), its theme felt completely one-note (the art world is smug and fueled by greed...I GET IT ALREADY!). Lastly, you could completely cut Malkovich's character out of the movie and it literally wouldn't have made a difference.
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#26
We tried watching it last night. I lasted... maybe a half-hour 'till it bored me into falling asleep. That could have been the wine talking but I doubt it.

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#27
I enjoyed it. It's a little bit of an overreach, but it mostly worked for me due to audacity and that killer cast. Plus, the final scene/kill is a hoot!
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#28
(02-02-2019, 03:12 PM)ratty Wrote: I enjoyed it.  It's a little bit of an overreach, but it mostly worked for me due to audacity and that killer cast.  Plus, the final scene/kill is a hoot!

Pretty much how I felt.
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#29
I thought this was pretty bad and barely a horror movie!
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#30
Quote:Lastly, you could completely cut Malkovich's character out of the movie and it literally wouldn't have made a difference.

SPOILERS

I think the fact that the Malkovich character (who ends up making art for himself) survives along with the Daveed Diggs character (who refuses to sell out) is pretty central to the movie.

This was excellent. Hilarious dark satire/morality play, with a superb cast, fun gore, and plenty of striking images. I do not believe the intention was to make a genuinely frightening film. I liked how some of the smaller roles were cast too- Pat Healy, Steven Williams, grocery store creep from Cobra, mega asshole brother from Ingrid Goes West. I hope Gyllenhaal & Gilroy keep the weirdo characters coming.

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#31
I thought this was pretty amusing. Had an arch, mean-spirited kind of EC horror comics vibe I liked a bunch. Great cast too.
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#32
(02-02-2019, 10:17 PM)Adam_72 Wrote:
Quote:Lastly, you could completely cut Malkovich's character out of the movie and it literally wouldn't have made a difference.


I think the fact that the Malkovich character (who ends up making art for himself) survives along with the Daveed Diggs character (who refuses to sell out) is pretty central to the movie.

That goes back to the one-note theme. The critic and the "money people" get killed off while the "true artists" survive. It's fine for a goofy horror movie, I guess, but I still think there could have been a better way to plug Malkovich more into the main narrative. He almost felt like he was in a completely different movie than everyone else.
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#33
(02-02-2019, 07:45 PM)atomtastic Wrote: I thought this was pretty bad and barely a horror movie!

(02-02-2019, 10:58 PM)slim Wrote: I thought this was pretty amusing. Had an arch, mean-spirited kind of EC horror comics vibe I liked a bunch. Great cast too.

Saw it. The allegory is noble, but the problem with the movie is its tone. It's too glib to be fun like a horror movie and too overreaching in successfully mastering its message about the divide between art and money. It plays like a Tales from the Crypt episode that got abandoned because it wasn't gratuitous enough.

I hate even saying that I disliked it because Nightcrawler is one of my favorite movies this decade. Roman J. Israel, Esq. was a letdown for me as well, but that at least had a compelling Denzel performance. Here, Gyllenhaal and Russo have so much potential in their characters (as do the rest of the cast), but they don't pop. Same goes for Toni Collette; I'm shocked at how she went from the command performance she gives in Hereditary to something this thankless.

I still have to see Roma - I'm hoping I can catch the 70mm screening at the Egyptian in a couple of weeks - but there has legitimately been only one Netflix movie I've watched and enjoyed (The Night Comes for Us).
"PREDATOR 2 feels like it was penned by convicts as part of a correctional facility's creative writing program, and that's what I love about it." - Moltisanti
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#34
Netflix movies (or at least movies they acquired) really have taken a step up recently, though. Not just Roma and Night Comes For Us but The Other Side of the Wind, Private Life, Buster Scruggs, Apostle, Happy as Lazzaro... they killed it this past Fall. Released half of my Top Ten.

And this year's slate is looking great, too, with High Flying Bird this Friday and another Soderbergh later this year and the Scorsese. There is definitely a shift happening and with the year-end success that Roma is having, Netflix is quickly becoming legitimized in the eyes of some of our finest filmmakers as an outlet for passion projects and other things that mainstream Hollywood is not willing to take a chance on.
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#35
What a truly bizarre film this is, though that’s not fully a bad thing.

This is no less savage an indictment of a particular field than writer/director Gilroy’s NIGHTCRAWLER, though it’s far more willing to be a bit goofy... arguably at the expense of truly involving us in the drama. It’s really a movie with two fairly distinct components: the supernatural horror yarn and the scathing satire. It’s a very uneasy mixture, primarily because the horror stuff never reaches the point of being truly effective or unsettling; it’s played straight (which is kind of surprising given the rest of the movie), but the scenarios feel quite conventional, strangely arbitrary, and ungoverned by any sort of defined rules. Things just happen. The big death sequences seem to happen for no apparent reason and with no motivation other than to slowly build up a body count. Part of me thinks it must be trying to be intentionally trope-y with its genre material as part of its overall commentary inclinations but that’s just a hunch. In any case, the horror doesn’t work nearly as well as the satire.

In terms of the cast, Jake Gyllenhaal is an absolute delight as the central figure of this tale, and he really makes the preposterous, faux-intellectual musings of his character sing in ways that are often very funny.

On the level that it's a skewering of the ridiculous pretentiousness of the modern art world and the very opportunistic people who - in this movie’s universe, anyway - inhabit it, it's an entertaining watch. But as an overall piece, it doesn't really cohere, or at least in as satisfying a way as I would have hoped.

It's truly idiosyncratic, though, and I can appreciate that.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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