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Post-Apocalypse Now or It's the End of the World as We Know It
#1
So, I was watching THE DOMESTICS the other night. If it had been fleshed out another 10-20 minutes, it could've been the real deal Holyfield. As is, still pretty good. A bit of classic RED DAWN, a bit THE WARRIORS, a bit MAD MAX, with somber tone of THE ROAD. Budget restraints perhaps hindered scope, and made climax feel too "Walking Dead"-ish, but was still pulled off more astutely than THE PURGE movies... It had the same vibe of the best part "The Stand", where you get a real sense of America just after collapse.

I was thinking again about the state of the world, and, cliché as it is, how these type of films don't feel as much like far off fantasy as they did even at height of Cold War nuclear paranoia and dread.

I know any discussion of where the genre is at now is going to be dominated by FURY ROAD, so be it, but I tend to be moved more by the smaller dystopian dramas like THE ROVER or YOUNG ONES.

I was a very big fan of THE BAD BATCH.

We've talked about this before elsewhere, so I know I may be the only one who goes back to THE BOOK OF ELI more than FURY ROAD, but alas that's me.

Just thinking on recent efforts, I really need to revisit SNOWPIERCER. because despite all the critical praise, I thought the allegory was kind of ludicrous.

I'll die on the hill defending 70's-mid-80's heyday of genre. Like nothing has ever come close to visceral thrills and scorched earth power of THE ROAD WARRIOR. Or delightful weirdness of say A BOY AND HIS DOG or DEAD END DRIVE-IN. Or NIGHT OF THE COMET. Or my favorite end of the world movie: MIRACLE MILE.

Definitive millennium film of this genre: I'd go with CHILDREN OF MEN. Not sure if I've seen it since the theatre, but emotional punch is still vivid.

The Best Near Misses: I AM LEGEND (imagine it without shitty cgi!) -doesn't stick the landing, but build up and mood setting rivals the awesome Chuck Heston version - and WORLD WAR Z

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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#2
Revisited NIGHT OF THE COMET a few years ago. I had fond memories of it but, IMNSHO, it doesn't really hold up.

BOOK OF ELI: I appreciate its ambition and that it has more on its mind than just action or visuals. I really dig that it's ultimately a movie about the value of preservation of knowledge and ideas. It's hobbled by the horribly miscast Kunis, who simply can't hold the screen next to such a stellar cast. For me, too, the movie seems to deflate somewhat after Eli leaves the town.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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#3
hoo-boy... I did NOT enjoy THE BAD BATCH

I dig BOOK OF ELI though
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#4
Waterworld is a flawed but massively entertaining film. At the time, it was the most expensive movie ever made and that was due soley to where it was filmed. These days, you could probably do the same film on a TV budget and an indoor pool with chromakey walls. The fact that it was shot on the open sea is the kind of batshit thing you'll never see again. As for the movie itself, it's like a proto-Avatar in its worldbuilding and ambition. Not all of it holds together, but I appreciate the ambition of it.
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#5
Of 90's era Costner's post-apocalypse diptych, I prefer The Postman.

Zardoz is a particular favorite of the genre.
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#6
There's an interesting one called LAST NIGHT (1998) from Canada that I liked, with an early role for Sandra Oh. Also Sarah Polley and David Cronenberg.
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#7
I like Young Ones and The Rover a lot.

I’d add Dredd and The Matrix to my list as well.

As for the post apocalypse in media, my favourite story and the way it was presented was in The Last Of Us.

If you want bleak hopelessness you can’t go wrong with Threads.

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#8
(06-23-2019, 08:07 PM)engineer Wrote: There's an interesting one called LAST NIGHT (1998) from Canada that I liked, with an early role for Sandra Oh.  Also Sarah Polley and David Cronenberg.

Last Night is a really fantastic film, and unlike anything else in the pre-apoc genre. Shoutout to Harpers Island fan fave Callum Keith Rennie who upon learning that the world is going to end does the only sensible thing and tries to fuck anything that moves.
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#9
THE POSTMAN is a lot of fun.

Not a lot of fun - TESTAMENT.

Given that it was some kind of cataclysm that lead to the collapse of North America, could we say that THE HUNGER GAMES is post-apoc?

I'm of the opinion that post-apocalyptic works actually are more effective in fiction/prose than they are in film, because you can achieve the kind of scope in books that nobody's been able to really get across in film thus far. By scope, I mean the ability to explore a period when the events before the apocalypse have passed from living memory, and a new society has been created.
home taping is killing music
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#10
THE POSTMAN is self-indulgent as all hell, but Will Patton is great.

The Matthew Fox/Jeffrey Donovan film EXTINCTION is a fantastic take on a post-apocalyptic zombie wasteland.

And I also love Ray Liotta's NO ESCAPE which, while not exactly post-apocalyptic, deserves to be mentioned because it's awesome.
I might have been born yesterday sir, but I stayed up all night!
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#11
(06-23-2019, 03:03 PM)Fat Elvis Wrote: The Best Near Misses: I AM LEGEND (imagine it without shitty cgi!) -doesn't stick the landing, but build up and mood setting rivals the awesome Chuck Heston version - and WORLD WAR Z

The first adaptation, The Last Man on Earth, is underappreciated. It's limited by its budget, but it hews closer to Matheson's story, and features a good Vincent Price performance and some eerie moments that likely influenced Night of the Living Dead. Speaking of which, Romero's movies definitely deserve a mention here.
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#12
I got shit for it on the boards, but I love LAND OF THE DEAD.

Super Underseen/ Underappreciated: CARRIERS

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#13
"Zombies, man. They creep me out."

LOTD has its flaws but Hopper isn't one of them.
Mangy Wrote:TCM 2 is like sentient cocaine.
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#14
I wanted to love LotD like I do the original trilogy.
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#15
My favorite trope of post-apocalyptic movies is seeing pop culture transmuted into folklore. I'm thinking of the "Come and Get Your Love" number in THE POSTMAN and the Star Wars as theater in REIGN OF FIRE.

More of that, please.
home taping is killing music
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#16
I really want to revisit REIGN OF FIRE.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#17
(06-24-2019, 10:28 AM)Evi Wrote: THE POSTMAN is self-indulgent as all hell, but Will Patton is great.

The Matthew Fox/Jeffrey Donovan film EXTINCTION is a fantastic take on a post-apocalyptic zombie wasteland.

And I also love Ray Liotta's NO ESCAPE which, while not exactly post-apocalyptic, deserves to be mentioned because it's awesome.


The best part of The Postman is that, for all intents and purposes, Tom Petty shows up in the film playing....Tom Petty.
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#18
I know you. You're... famous.
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#19
(06-24-2019, 07:38 PM)Fat Elvis Wrote: I got shit for it on the boards, but I love LAND OF THE DEAD

LAND is so good. I was kind of sour on it initially, but it’s really grown on me over the past decade. My biggest gripe is that it’s too short - I love the world Romero builds and I wish the movie took a bit more time to explore it.

It’s interesting to watch LAND back to back with DAY, which meanders plot-wise, really luxuriating in the trials and tribulations of a cast of mostly miserable characters, like a hangout movie in hell. LAND actually has characters I like and want to spend time with, but Romero keeps everything moving along at such a brisk pace.
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#20
(06-24-2019, 08:52 PM)Fat Elvis Wrote: I really want to revisit REIGN OF FIRE.

Ehhhhh.

McConaughey is fun for his scenery and cigar chewing. The dragon(s) are well rendered. But it's dreary without being compelling, and I don't think we're ever all that invested in the humans.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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#21
(06-24-2019, 10:35 PM)atomtastic Wrote: I know you. You're... famous.

*tom petty smirk and laugh*

"I was."
home taping is killing music
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#22
(06-24-2019, 10:18 AM)boone daniels Wrote: I'm of the opinion that post-apocalyptic works actually are more effective in fiction/prose than they are in film, because you can achieve the kind of scope in books that nobody's been able to really get across in film thus far. By scope, I mean the ability to explore a period when the events before the apocalypse have passed from living memory, and a new society has been created.

I’m inclined to agree with that. I think Hillcoat did an admirable job adapting The Road, but film as a medium had a hard time conveying certain aspects of McCarthy’s novel that came across pretty easily and naturally in that medium. Mainly, time itself. The passage of time was unclear in the movie, whereas in the book, there were always allusions to interesting that made it integral to the story. “We had one day of food left, the next day we ate our last food, the day after that we had no food, the day after that we had no food again until we found some scraps that afternoon,” and so on. Hard to get across on screen.
Originally posted by Schwartz on Cool as Ice ("When a girl has a heart of stone, there's only one way to melt it. Just add Ice."):
"It's not just a mixed metaphor, or that the stone is one that is melting...but the ice is actually making it melt. (kisses fingers) Magnifique."
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#23
I have always been a fan of Night of the Comet. I like lets make the end of the world look like fun vibe of the movie. That said the scene when Samantha and Regina are being held captive by the zombie mall employees is a good tense scene. Its the first half of my personal Christmas double feature. The second half is Better Off Dead. The line,"You where born with an asshole Doris, you don't need Chuck," cracks me up every time.
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is I've lost my way. The good news is I'm way ahead of schedule!
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